Skip to main content

Full text of "Edison Microfilm Reel 186"

See other formats


I  II  I  I  'I  'I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I 

10  20  30  40  50  60  70 

MILLIMETERS 


Ct  £dlfcoru  1?ip£**> 


A  SELECTIVE  MICROFILM  EDITION 

PART  IV 
(1899-1910) 


Thomas  E.  Jeffrey 
Lisa  Gitelman 
Gregory  Jankunis 
David  W.  Hutchings 
Leslie  Fields 


Theresa  M.  Collins 
Gregory  Field 
Aldo  E.  Salerno 
Karen  A.  Detig 
Lorie  Stock 


Robert  Rosenberg 
Director  and  Editor 


Sponsors 

Rutgers,  The  State  University  Of  New  Jersey 
National  Park  Service,  Edison  National  Historic  Site 
New  Jersey  Historical  Commission 
Smithsonian  Institution 


University  Publications  of  America 
Bethesda,  MD 
1999 


Edison  signature  used  with  permission  of  MoGraw-Edlson  Company 


Thomas  A.  Edison  Papers 
at 

Rutgers,  The  State  University 
endorsed  by 

National  Historical  Publications  and  Records  Commission 
18  June  1981 

Copyright  ©  1999  by  Rutgers,  The  State  University  •  ■  • 

All  rights  reserved.  No  part  of  this  publication  including  any  portion  of  the  guide  and  index  or  of 
the  microfilm  may  be  reproduced,  stored  hi  a  retrieval  system,  or  transmitted  hi  any  form  by  any 
means — graphic,  electronic,  mechanical,  or  chemical,  hicludhigphotocopyhig,  recordingor  taphig, 
or  information  storage  and  retrieval  systems— without  written  permission  of  Rutgers,  The  State 
University,  New  Brunswick,  New  Jersey. 

The  original  documents  hi  this  edition  are  from  the  archives  at  the  Edison  National  Historic  Site 
at  West  Orange,  New  Jersey. 

ISBN  0-89093-703-6 


THOMAS  A.  EDISON  PAPERS 


Robert  A.  Rosenberg 
Director  and  Editor 

Thomas  E.  Jeffrey 
Associate  Director  and  Coeditor 

Paul  B.  Israel 

Managing  Editor,  Book  Edition 
Helen  Endick 

Assistant  Director  for  Administration 


Associate  Editors 
Theresa  M.  Collins 
Lisa  Gitelman 
Keith  A.  Nier 

Research  Associates 
Gregory  Jankunis 
Lorie  Stock 


Assistant  Editors 
Louis  Cariat 
Aido  E.  Salerno 


Secretary 
Grace  Kurkowski 


Student  Assistants 

Amy  Cohen  Jessica  Rosenberg 

Bethany  Jankunis  Stacey  Saeig 

Laura  Konrad  Wojtek  Szymkowiak 

Vishal  Nayak  Matthew  Wosniak 


BOARD  OF  SPONSORS 


Rutgers,  The  State  University  of  New  National  Park  Service 
Jersey  John  Maounis 

Francis  L.  Lawrence  Maryanne  Gerbauckas 

Joseph  J.  Seneca  Roger  Durham 

Richard  F.  Foley  George  Tselos 

David  M.  Oshinsky  Smithsonian  Institution 

New  Jersey  Historical  Commission  Bernard  Finn 

Howard  L.  Green  Arthur  P.  Molella 


EDITORIAL  ADVISORY  BOARD 

James  Brittahi,  Georgia  Institute  of  Technology 
R.  Frank  Colson,  University  of  Southampton 
Louis  Galambos,  Johns  Hopkins  University 
Susan  Hockey,  University  of  Alberta 
Thomas  Parke  Hughes,  University  of  Pennsylvania 
Peter  Robinson,  Oxford  University 

Philip  Scranton,  Georgia  Institute  of  Technology/Hagiey  Museum  and  Library 
Merritt  Roe  Smith,  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology 


FINANCIAL  CONTRIBUTORS 


PRIVATE  FOUNDATIONS 
The  Alfred  P.  Sloan  Foundation 
Charles  Edison  Fund 
The  Hyde  and  Watson  Foundation 
National  Trust  for  the  Humanities 
Geraldine  R.  Dodge  Foundation 


PUBLIC  FOUNDATIONS 
National  Science  Foundation 
National  Endowment  for  the 
Humanities 

National  Historical  Publications  and 
Records  Commission 


PRIVATE  CORPORATIONS  AND  INDIVIDUALS 


Alabama  Power  Company 

Anonymous 

AT&T 

Atlantic  Electric 

Association  of  Edison  Illuminating 
Companies 

Batteile  Memorial  Institute 
The  Boston  Edison  Foundation 
Cabot  Corporation  Foundation,  Inc. 
Carolina  Power  &  Light  Company 
Consolidated  Edison  Company  of  New 
York,  Inc. 

Consumers  Power  Company 
Cooper  Industries 
Corning  Incorporated 
Duke  Power  Company 
Entergy  Corporation  (Middle  South 
Electric  System) 

Exxon  Corporation 

Florida  Power  &  Light  Company 

General  Electric  Foundation 

Gould  Inc.  Foundation 

Gulf  States  Utilities  Company 

David  and  Nina  Heitz 

Hess  Foundation,  Inc. 

Idaho  Power  Company 


IMO  Industries 

International  Brotherhood  of  Electrical 
Workers 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stanley  H.  Katz 
Matsushita  Electric  Industrial  Co.,  Ltd. 
Midwest  Resources,  Inc. 

Minnesota  Power 
New  Jersey  Bell 
New  York  State  Electric  &  Gas 
Corporation 

North  American  Philips  Corporation 
Philadelphia  Electric  Company 
Philips  Lighting  B.V. 

Public  Service  Electric  and  Gas  Company 

RCA  Corporation 

Robert  Bosch  GmbH 

Rochester  Gas  and  Electric  Corporation 

San  Diego  Gas  and  Electric 

Savannah  Electric  and  Power  Company 

Schering-Plough  Foundation 

Texas  Utilities  Company 

Thomas  &  Betts  Corporation 

Thomson  Grand  Public 

Transamerica  Delavol  Inc. 

Westinghouse  Foundation 
Wisconsin  Public  Service  Corporation 


A  Note  on  the  Sources 

The  pages  which  have  been 
filmed  are  the  best  copies 
available.  Every  technical 
effort  possible  has  been 
made  to  ensure  legibility. 


PUBLICATION  AND  MICROFILM 
COPYING  RESTRICTIONS 


Reel  duplication  of  the  whole  or  of 
any  part  of  this  film  is  prohibited. 
In  lieu  of  transcripts,  however, 
enlarged  photocopies  of  selected 
items  contained  on  these  reels 
may  be  made  in  order  to  facilitate 
research. 


Patent  Application  Book,  PN-09-01-21 


This  small  looseleaf  binder,  which  was  compiled  by  or  for  Frank  D. 
Lewis  of  the  Legal  Department,  contains  information  about  patent 
applications.  The  applicants  include  Edison,  Jonas  W.  Aylsworth,  Frank  L. 
Dyer,  Miller  Reese  Hutchison,  Alexander  N.  Pierman,  and  other  employees, 
as  well  as  outside  parties  under  obligation  to  Edison  or  to  one  of  his 
companies.  The  applications,  which  cover  the  period  January  1 909- 
November  1912,  are  grouped  according  to  the  following  categories: 
phonograph  machines,  recorders  and  reproducers,  records,  moving  pictures, 
storage  battery,  cement,  electrical,  numbering  machines,  primary  battery, 
compositions,  and  miscellaneous.  Each  entry  provides  the  name  of  the 
applicant,  application  date,  serial  and  folio  numbers,  and  a  brief  summary  of 
the  specification.  Some  of  the  entries  also  include  a  drawing  or  an  indication 
that  the  patent  was  assigned  to  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Co.,  Edison 
Storage  Battery  Co.,  New  Jersey  Patent  Co.,  or  Thomas  A.  Edison,  Inc.  The 
pages  are  unnumbered.  Approximately  400  pages  have  been  used. 


flolio  -460 - f  ilea— Marnh-tl-fi-  -  -i-gno  -  j 

■f-f-i—H- 1  -by-j-F-;.  -D.  j-Iewia'-M-U 

. V  :  •  -S erial_N.o..j_483.,42^._iT] 

.L _ !  Con'oeals a  Horn-  Phonogratih]  i 


f  oj^aaij^dn! 


i- 

T"_ 

j... 

L 

"t 

1"‘ 

! 

: 

! 

a 

& 

I 

II 
i  : 

: 

! 

i 

4 

4 

I! 

..jb 

'r 

Eolio-518... 

P  j'  '  ■ 

Machine -fo 
ter-reoprd 
eiijg.ipushe 
eproduoer . 

-..filed  jJuly  22;  . 

.  .SerialUo.!  5109, 

..  Fran  c  D.|Dyer_j_ 

:iarg5  and  email 
,  -the  -  small]- rjeoo 
iaok  ..to..  ;erigage. . 

L9C 

3< 

' 

d 

d 

lie 

9 

at 

1 

‘  j  -  ■ 
j  : 

. 

1; 

la  re 

--  4-1- 4- 

olio  519 

.!.  ! 

j.  . 

.  . .  Muo;  ii 

e.  .aijtd  sma 

-  .  file'd  JJx^ly  82  i  1909 
Serial!  KoJ  509,040 
Prank  I..  Dyer' 

ie  adaptod  to  play  i 
11  diajne,ter.,:reo6rds.  . 

LLf  III..  J  i  i 

! 

j 

i 

; 

! 

..i 

j 

v 

1 

,!| 

| 

: 

: 

; 

'/ 

/, 

_ 

\ 

:.u 

.. 

-j- 

-  ; 

.!.... 

-L. 

, 

£ 

- 

4 

. . 

t 

.  .  j 

I  i 

(> 

V 

\Y 

Y 

J  . 

-  4- 

j 

1 

1: 

- 

II 

> — .. 
(ri- 

t 

- 

|| 

-jr 

i 

-  ~r 

5E 

. 

;4 

_ 

--■! 

\\ 

\ 

. 

Ik 

III 

V 

V 

g 

55 

sgs 

111 

\ 

1 

\ 

4 

\ 

K 

i 

i 

/ 

/ 

In 

\ 

■ 

SB 

yy 

| 

a 

“j 

5  j; 

.... 

_ 

4 

ri 

r 

■ 

l 

1 

hr 

4 

/ 

SI 

r 

j 

/ 

/ 

t 

r~ 

i 

' 

ZJ 

_ .! 

_ j  j  _ 

j 

_[ 

J 

n 

! _ j 

j... 

~j 

[_ 

L 

I 

- 

_ 

-X- 

- 

— - 

-  - 1 

— 

- 

>(  - 

4- 

- 

J- 

tx 

]Z 

I]Z 

_ 

y 

=T 

iZl.l  ...... !  "  *£££:  !" 

•  r  ■ 

. 

ii 

■ 

■1 

: 

::|  y:ii:;::JZ::vZfZZ 

;  i 
i 

n 

Polio 

•1  1 

J 

26 

- 

"i 

ilea  Augusl 
ofiallNp;| 

E 

rr 

■7 

I  • 

190' 

78 

' 

Polio  573  -  filedi  Peb/ '3.t  I9l0 

1  "1"- -  -  r  '  Serial  Ho.  '541  ,'763 

j  H  i  ■  . . Aylsmjoi|tli 

.... 

1 

zj  xzztj:;  i:  rzi  z.Liz±[zz:r 

|  .  [  !  Phonograph  reoord  turn- 

1 

Prion 

°g 

ra 

pi 

Piresid 

a" 

M 

oa 

9j  !  tarilie_  adapt ed_  to  hold  dds.o  jreb- 

“ 

;; 

: 

- 

= 

= 

Z 

■^-z^z-zz^-z&rz 

-  - 1 .  -  yi.  2CL  3/T(  yZ  ^  *xc  /T- 

11U  LM  M  M  n  i.-i  1  l  7  HI 

■■"BBBBBEBBBB^ISIS""""** 

z 

■■HniiiimiMHHnB 

BB 

■■■■■■■BBBBBBb3bBBBBK 

... 

j 

bbbbbBbbbbbbbbBbbbbBb 

z 

iHbhbBiBbBhhhhhbhbhhbb 

”Z 

■'BBBBBBBBBBBBbBBBBBBBB 

■■ 

■liiBBBBiBlilBBBSiaii 

■■ 

{bbbBbbbBbBbbbi 

!■ 

mm 

...  uxi .......  -  FT  nTTTTTI 

ii 

B 

LizttxuJxt  ml  r  nirtTii 

m 

■■ 

"'n 

■■ 

iBiIhbmhuhhni? 

j 

!■  KSEEBBi"1™*"® 

a 

i 

-£ 

1 

1 

z 

Z 

J 

1 

x 

X 

— 

z|z 

_ 

z 

_ 

z 

MliliBSBBilBBiiiiiBgaall 

■Polio  ;  619  r  filed  iugJ  ia,  11910 

■  i"  *"  j  !  !  iil  iyier  |  j  -j  j 
'  SerialjFo;  577;7.75" 

!  j  '  j  jA^gnct.  Go|."  j ' 

I  :  :  Di'so;  SiJoiiihe;  With  the  jh'orri 
aono'ealbd  in'  oabiheti,  jthe'  par-' 

tition  having  ' the'’  turntdb'le  arid . 

spring  factor's  "secured  (thereto  i 
adapted;  to  jbW  : pull edj "out  like  'a 
drav/er  to  receive  the  ireo'ord'.  !  I 


Polio  643 

rij 

e 

I 

•i 

J 

i 

)0 

Li 

N 

b. 

to 

C 

7 

58 

5 

191 

i; 

r 

10 

"T 

rn 

■■ 

B. 

Sei 

■i' 

737 

al 

lei 

ip 

lac 

h: 

Lh< 

ri 

7i 

5h 

mo 

I 

it 

~ 

i 

i 

1 z 

■ 

.  .. 

7-" 

— - 

polio 

it 

651 

filed! Oot 
Pi  ii .  i  Dye 
Serial”  No 

,0910 
588  jpL' 

— 

-i 

'oil 

i 

>70 

— !f  ik  ejd-  No  v  J  •  -1 8 1  - 1 
■  P.  -E.  Traphagen 

910 

L- 

ASgnc 

: 

J-P. 

W..T.1 

1 

T! 

|  i  ! 

-1- . 

• 

— 

T" 

-r-R- 

- 

4 . 4 

lorn  : 

oncealei_iiorn|.p 

honogr.aph. 

;; 

having  -knife-  (iaieraj 

novej- 

- 

:::: 

U1 

~ 

”  ■ 

5v 

: 

::J 

4 

z 

Sc: 

— 

T_zt 

" 

: 

\- 

z 

2 

\ 

8fl 

|=; 

pb 

l 

I 

%z 

jz 

£ 

l 

1 

= 

zd: 

£=3=St 

H 

■i 

u 

:: 

Tc 

of 

:E: 

T.  - 

| 

z 

= 

l 

L.  _ 

■■■1 

r4-4 

_LL 

95! 

999 

95! 

■■■ 

pF 

-H- 

■■■ 

- 

- 

-E 

-U 

= 

=LL 

-4- 

jy= 

33 

i- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

_ 

4--P 

_ 

up 

_ 

Pbl 

ran 

to 

io 

na 

_ 

'  ; 

.  .j. 

69? 

ne 

vd 

e 

■" 

S£ 

0£ 

fi 

U 

e 

s 

j 

red 

Hi- 

rial 

nd. 

Ti¬ 
ll  on 
0  |  b 

Pe 
Pi 
•N 
•  H 

OS 

>. 

er 

0. 

.J 

ra 

at 

1 

na 

6 

.P 

. 

Ph 

ta 

39 

Jl 

,c 

Do 

- 

en 

ad 

i  "  ’ 

L  '. 

'911 

_ 

. I~h 

w- 

p 

oli< 

70C 

: 

■  •fi 

.8 

A 

•i 

' 

1 

ll 

;o 

10 

i’e 

Ed 

N 

' 

I'd 

b. 

°° 

l 

in 

i 

an 

6 

30 

r 

7, 

09 

re 

,0 

ao 

00 

91 

9S 

hi 

rd 

1" 

na 

s". 

; 

.  !• 

z~ 

Bl 

oh 

Si 

de 

ir 

8E 

o; 

- 

;■ 

ha 

vi 

ng 

rr 

* 

i 

ej 

al 

r-d 

>e 

il 

!o 

F 

J 

2, 

... 

- 

... 

" 

.... 

: 

... 

! 

£ 

z 

T- 

> 

.. 

t- 

” 

. . : 

: 

" 

:  ~J 

" 

- 

- 

- 

" 

3 

M 

2Z 

_ 

- 

/ 

/ 

-v: 

/ 

% 

Z 

... 

A 

J 

i~" 

/ 

'v 

y1 

j 

Z 

Q 

— i 

j 

L_ 

Z 

'L. 

O, 

Zj 

j 

J 

- 

: . i 

u 

-_j 

P 

I 

zi 

— 

- 

- 

- 

_ 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

__ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

ZL 

y 

3 

z 

3 

.= 

- 

3 

= 

z 

— 

z 

- 

z 

I 

bt 

J7 

ffolio  -701. -•  filed-  Feb.  jl?,  :1911  ■ 

"! . rn  T  T  H:|-| 


al--Ho.-j609  J-l( 


ing  horn  --  improvement  on -folio ,  .  .  , 
UW  -  -  having -lift- -lever- at  I-  |  I 
bottom  of-hornj-ahd|-v,ertioal-  shaft  -  — 


i  of_ho]  •nj.sup;  lorft . _ _ _ 

:±ttf±l±tpz: 


-I  -  4 -  4-  i  --  ..Serial.  No..  610.,'G3i  j 


- 1- — 

Design  of  -  mouth  piebe  for  — 
-  speaking- tube lob- business -mb-  - 

--chine.-  ■  - . | . ; -  - - I _ 

- — : 


i±=i+EEr±ET: 


ini: 


■ 

r 

~ 

” 

•f 

r: 

f 

.. 

r 

•e 

■ 

1 1  ^ 

... 

> 

)i 

io 

5 

00 

i] 

Lee 

i 

ia 

•o 

i, 

190 

9  ' 

1 

V 

Vi 

.0 

5 

30 

“fin 

t 

- 

Ll 

9 

5.9 

_ 

“ 

■£ 

hi 

Lb 

ei 

irU 

Q 

sd 

II 

3. 

* 

Car 

"J’.'P 

480 

ter, 
•  Co . 
,958 

- 

- 

- 

■ 

■ 

er 

is 

b\ 

1 

11 

a] 

i 

6 

.... 

.7 

3 

36 

■ 

- 

f 

m 

ha 

0° 

R 

r 

pe 

■f 

i 

ro 

fit 

st 

e 

dr 

te 

tl 

: 

he 

r 

~ec 

fc 

03 

a 

"TT”' 

ti(70 ;  rain 
3  having 

•; 

uto 

;aj? 

arid 

pade 

.. 

... 

1 

B 

3V 

sp 

sr 

:o 

lu 

30 

r 

,i 

«, 

w: 

!. 

vel 

8 

y 

.u 

B 

” 

a 

9 

or 

r 

kin 

Df 

r 

30 

or 

a. 

'.]  . 

- 

....; 

. 

.... 

.. 

- 

: 

I 

1 

fa 

-■ 

~ 

— 

: 

: 

x 

5 

X 

- 

- 

-S 

- 

: 

- 

- 

l" 

■ 

... 

c 

r. 

z 

i 

1 

f 

¥ 

0 

. 

c 

: 

.... 

... 

... 

... 

V 

f 

!  1 

Z 

. 

... 

... 

’T: 

1 

i 

” 

- 

.. 

L. 

I 

X 

... 

I 

— 

ry 

V 

( 

s 

) 

. 

j 

r... 

h 

j 

£ 

- 

rr 

... 

- 

£ 

£ 

£ 

£ 

£ 

5 

£ 

£ 

£ 

£ 

- 

£ 

i 

£ 

A 

- 

J 

= 

= 

f 

= 

= 

= 

.... 

1= 

- 

- 

- 

- 

= 

- 

= 

= 

7 

M 

:: 

- 

7 

k 

i  ! 

- 

i  ' 

F 

Dl 

«. 

5 

43 

ile'( 

il 

0 

2 

3, 

190 

9 

i-r 

P 

Dl 

0 

.. 

5 

45 

f 

il 

■ 

7 

ed 

.. 

oli. 

: 

.2 

1 

30 

9 

5 

ei 

is 

A 

11 

:a 

.s 

5 

n 

25 

,063 

}7 

7 

er 

ia 

A 

i 

No. ;  525 
aisonj 

3 

33 

-E 

a 

t 

id 

tie 

He 

G 

pr 

nd 

en 

Da 

ul 

tr 

no 

at 

e 

ei 

i: 

of 

1 

S 

ai 

me 

eI 

iT 

V' 

is 

m 

da 

l 

mi 

10 

it 

5r 

3r 

fr 

om 

- 

. 

■H 

.. 

ep 

rc 

ai 

0  ( 

; 

- 

.. 

.. 

• 

p 

" 

' 

“ 

• 

... 

. 

- 

.... 

! 

r 

1 

z. 

~ 

" 

7 

! 

_ 

\ 

4?/ 

t/O/9 

w. 

d 

z 

__ 

„ 

r— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

J 

, 

. 

i- 

/ 

/ 

-• 

... 

... 

' 

... 

- 

.. .: 

... 

7 

. 

7 

" 

“ 

— 

— 

x 

££ 

=3 

~ 

— 

' 

... 

—4 

j 

Z 

J. 

T 

— 

.  _ 

— 

"<e: 

§ 

E? 

X 

.... 

•  — 

7 

- 

X 

■ 

-  ■’ 

i 

7 

•E 

% 

_ 

!' 

.... 

■ 

~ 

■  i 

> 

r  ' 

““ 

i 

.... 

... 

•-”j 

... : 

hr 

- 

•- 

— 

- 

... 

n~ 

— 

— ! 

*  i* 

— 

.... 

— 

" 

. 

— 

— 

— i 

— 

“ 

— 

■“! 

—  f 

— 

— : 

” 

■— 

|“ 

— 

... 

.... 

- 

.... 

. 

. ■ 

” 

- 

“ 

— 

- 

- ; 

— 

- 

.... 

h 

; 

~  i 

i*.- 

' 

-•! 

— 

-■ 

— 

- 

r 

1 

_ 

__ 

7“ 

E 

E 

= 

t 

5 

U1 

Jr 

: 

7 

7 

7 

7 

: 

• 

- 

7 

L. 

P 

p 

7 

J 

Ser: 

a: 

■: 

0 

56 

56 

1 

'  1 

o: 

i 

50 

Fi 

Le 

a 

June 

191 

:: 

ne 

Pi 

lX 

"'1P 

ans 

lea 

* 

TO 

rr 

aograp 
dlyisi 
r.  \  13, 

A.  ;Edison- 

. 

:  i  J  ;  1 

h  determini 
orial  applTo' 
1903;  • 

If 

.6 

. 

• 

l 

' 

: 

; 

'  ' 

■ 

R 

GC 

rde 

Se 

r. 

r. 

ri 

A 

al 

*: 

ITo. 

Edla 

:.i 

66 

:: 

7 

,( 

)6 

3 

i  . 
!... 

A 

•  nt 

.L 

!  J 

■  ! 

' 

Fo 

le 

00 

tc 

__ 

- 

' 

p.th . 

of 

.  0 

ut 

.. 

_ 

... 

\  - 

- 

- 

.. 

... 

... 

; 

" 

- 

7 

. 

.... 

1- 

— 

" 

' 

.... 

... 

- 

- 

- 

- 

T! 

j? 

_ 

~ 

s§5 

J 

/f: 

v& 

~ 

’>u 

... 

: 

... 

f 

‘ 

... 

:: 

- 

... 

.... 

L 

... 

.. 

... 

... 

“p 

d 

t 

- 

" 

. 

.. 

E 

I 

... 

:  ■ 

; 

... 

__ 

... 

: 

... 

... 

1:: 

- 

... 

... 

... 

.... 

.... 

... 

... 

- 

... 

E 

E 

.... 

~ 

... 

... 

L 

~~ 

E 

... 

| . 

E 

■  1 

□ 

7 

~~ 

j 

s 

7 

= 

- 

- 

~ 

...: 

7 

A 

: 

......; 

.... 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

=u 

E 

E 

XI 

I 

I 

I 

7 

Poll 

0 

69 

5- 

:± 

•  •• 

Fbb 

Gal 

No 

-N. 

L 

- 

J. 

2, 

60 

P. 

■1 

C 

91 

99 

0. 

L 

3 

. 

P 

1 

0 

6 

98 

- 

fi 

J. 

3o 

is 

le 

d" 

Pe 

He 

b 

Li 

.0 

a 

8 

' 

fii 
A.  1 
Ser 
Asgx 

d 

\ 

La 

d 

T 

. 

.7 

id 

0 

1 

6 

: 

: 

idiS 

;ylu 

: 

i  h 

tand 

B-le 

..; . 

al 

d. 

0 

■T' 

epro 

ar.d 

vers 

duoe 

T0OC 

on 

r 

rc 

ii 

f 

s 

d 

3r 

h 

A] 

av 

an 

mb 

in 

le 

ii- 

it 

ol 

th 

.. 

3 

: 

... 

8? 

R 

a 

30 

ih 

>r 

le 

fo 

bo 

si 

» 

SE 

h. 

s. 

; 

. 

... 

r 

pressed 

; 

■ 

C 

' 

. 

b 

— 

" 

~ 

_ 

— 

~ 

~~ 

.. 

.. 

. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

.... 

- 

== 

zc. 

zzz 

E3 

3 

S3 

L= 

£ 

s 

§ 

F 

_ 

.. 

... 

_ 

.... 

~ 

~ 

... 

..... 

- 

- 

— 

“ 

“ 

- 

... 

E 

E 

55 

- 

-- 

- 

- 

i ... 

- 

.... 

i 

" 

;;; 

■ 

~~ 

“ 

; 

~ 

“ 

E 

:: 

- 

.... 

~~ 

“ 

~~ 

| 

“ 

E 

“ 

~ 

“ 

““ 

“ 

L_ 

~~ 

~ 

“ 

~ 

“ 

___ 

__ 

~ 

,r 

E 

~~ 

~ 

Ii 

~~ 

__ 

“ 

” 

ji 

1 

~ 

_ 

__ 

Jt= 

— 

— 

= 

= 

— 

— 

4- 

4- 

- 

= 

I 

- 

— 

_ 

-2 

7; 

3 

z 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

... 

_ 

_ 

__ 

_ 

„ 

/ 

Folio  730  ;-]  filed  April1  5,  -1911  • 
-  "i Serial -No  ••1619,002-: 

j  •;  ;  A1.  Fi  Gall  M-  -I  : 

■  ;  :  :ABgnd  T va'.E.  ;  Ino;  ; 


|  !  ■  Reproducer  for  |diso  [machine  ■ 
b'dnterinfe-  device  j  for  •  reproducer;  - 
with'  ball  'aiiaNooket  jo'int:.  1  t  "  '  ' 


'  ffi&SEftSli  ?n 

i . :  ■ -T/.'-H.)  Miller  j  -)-  ■  - 

-j  ■  jAsgnd!-  T  AJeL,.  Ino.  - 


Reproducer] for  disc  jreoords 


with!  sound;  modifier.] 


:  : 

! 

; '  i 

Poll 

o  4 

81 

- 

i: 

y 

ei 

i 

! 

ed 

J.: 

la! 

.prii 
V.jAyl 
-No.  49 

& 

29 

aw 

3. 

re 

hi 

It 

Le 

so 

.  19 
orth 
054 

oord 

09 

8 

la 

rl 

1 

r- 

no 

> 

8- 

£- 

h 

P 

F 

ol 

io 

4 

82 

nd 

t 

-E 

er 

ii 

y 

01 

33 

Leo 

Jv 

ia] 

■if 

Ma 

W. 

;N 

r_ 

A 

ri 

4 

1 

)W 

)3 

309 

orth 

,416 

3- 

1- 

- 

6 

t 

u 

0 

t 

f 

"a 

■  i 

f  ma 

io  ,'i 

Sail 
a  th 
ial 

liioti 

i's'si 

iffi 

armf 

rodu 

ft.ejr 

Pr 

ter 

oon 

y'-a 

e|  b 
vao 
the 
on 
pkt 

!e 

ojts 

iez 

ooe 

a 

oti 

aim 

08 

& 

”1 

tna 

■■ 

M 

10 

10 

sn 

w 

m 

ii 

( 

8t 

th 

a-i 

oi 

it 

an 

Do 

38 

8" 

til 

at 

-lot 

.! 

st 

i'l" 

■jot 

5[-E 

mat 

ere 

,o.t.i 

oi 

xl 

S 

o: 

.£ 

xt 

ar 

t> 

t 

ol 

ic 

ir 

ng 

a 

ii 

■  i 

a' 

e 

e( 

i 

n 

-£ 

no 

.z 

l 

10 

la 

.8 

0 

;t 

0 

n 

h 

Ld 

lb 

Co 

Lt 

;r 

B 

1 

c 

In 

.a 

!“ 

SS 

IS 

5 

w 

in 

i 

.1 

fch 

io 

0 

as 

a.. 

ra 

P 

a 

yi 

a 

a 

Co 

ri 

oi 

in 

8 

na 

rm 

ou 

au 

ae 

ar 

a] 

8 

old 

r 

e  p 
aae 
aeb 
non 

na 

roc 

ini 

ya« 

-pi 

a 

u 

a 

10 

.3 

36 

w 

t 

in 

; 

.0 

>1 

a 

ftp 

r/h 

>0 

qu 

o. 

’0 

n- 

iv 

le 

sr 

a 

a 

PS 

sm 

p 

nt 

la 

pa 

? 

e 

8 

a 

b 

1 

a 

■ 

rd 

10 

Lb 

.n 

in 

in 

1 

i.a 

sa 

ot 

8  0 

he 

n 

8 

p 

DX 

.n 

>a 

id 

$ 

it 

le 

s 

r_o 

“f 

*: 

p- 

P 

Ij 

: 

: 

I 

: 

: 

_ 

-E 

= 

= 

= 

— 

- 

— 

i— 

_ 

- 

— 

—4 

a  Ldi 

"TH 

h'g 

e  a 

suo 

bOTJ 

i 

01 

si 

a 

b 

10 

_ 

18 

u 

iis 

u 

_ 

or 

l _ 

H 

- 

~ 

~ 

n 

r 

“ 

— 

— 

~ 

“ 

-- 

-- 

- 

m 

a 

ti 

I 

L 

_ 

1( 

DOdS 
3W  £ 

fS 

usi 

eta 

gia 

IS 

■i 

Lk 

3- 

I  S: 

K 

)S 
.  0 

h~ 

ta 

&S 

[j 

“  “i 

no 

fl 

.  8] 

iell 

ao, 

6 1 

C 

L] 

:: 

I 

L| 

T 

I 

j. 

!“ 

J 

s 

7] 

K) 

r 

1 1 

V. 

i 

J 

L.l 

\ 

r 

7” 

I-. 

r 

_ | 

.  i 

L 

L 

-I 

j 

j 

-  4 

-- 

— 

— 

— 

- 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

_ 

- 

JL 

_ 

U 

— 

- 

_ 

III 

=1 

is 

5B 

me 

- 

f 

/ 

12 

05 

. 

- 

- 

. 

'i. 

Po 

iio 

53 

0_ 

- 

f 

Lied 

J 

un 

, 

19 

13 

n 

5 

P.8 

f 

il 

er 

• 

ed 

ia 

W. 

t 

BY 

t, 

l 

DO 

- 

- 

J 

s 

ir 

" 

Ik 

" 

ylsworts 

Loj.--;501-; 

83i6' 

... 

- 

- 

: 

- 

s 

1. 

J 

No 

* 

5] 

701 

L6, 

-tl 

3 

D9 

oe 

S£ 

01 

in 

im 

IP 

DO 

paratu 

S 

for 

" 

- 

M 

st 

Re 

CO 

a 

... 

... 

" 

... 

- 

T. 

vapo 

oomp 

1 

T' 

r: 

re 

z: 

at 

nE 

tE 

me 

n 

f 

a 

Ill 

M 

5"' 

m 

Z 

ta 

le 

n 

si 

by 

ra 

" 

b3 

e 

. 

’ 

■■ 

■ 

T 

.  j.. 

° 

... 

' 

... 

... 

- 

■  ■ 

- 

- 

“ 

■ 

- 

: 

- 

- 

... 

- 

... 

... 

- 

... 

~ 

- 

- 

-! 

I- 

: 

- 

| 

7 

- 

- 

-■ 

... 

h 

I 

■' 

- 

- 

... 

- 

... 

: 

::: 

: 

J 

" 

. 

- 

- 

- 

:: 

- 

L 

U 

j 

. 

_ 

c 

i  \ 

: . i 

:Z 

i 

”1 

_ 

1 

si t 

- 

I; 

:: 

H 

rd 

~ 

= 

z- 

j 

Z. 

:: 

1 

dr 

E 

= 

y 

y 

= 

E 

= 

= 

= 

y 

E 

y 

j 

= 

7 

-n. 


-  Folio -610:--fiTea  'July  ;16, ' 1910 . 

T"  "TJ . I .  •  Serial  Uor  :572',287  r 

-f  ■  - 1 . . . -  -W Hv  ■  -Mi-lller  -  ■ . -i . - 


616  -  filed  Aug.  6,  1910 

|  . Serial- ITo;  575,981  ~ 

I - 4.ylEiw^r-tjh-|&-|Aikenj-- - 


: _ I  ;  ]  folding  records  -  blowing  a  . 

[  ;  stroam  of  air  through'  the  rotat-  . 

"|  ling-jmolds'  whioh;  hav;e  reoeived’  a - 

-  •  oharge  o f-  material-toLc'o oil-  tlie-f - 

; . same.  •  i~  - -| — f ^ | — ( — j — — i Ll-| { i _ 


:  :  rl  -I  .  ; . ~ 

i - l.WA)| - L-kC. _ X _ 


i '  i  I  ’l^roifess!  of'  mord'irig'fdTsdnre'd^ - 

1  '  ords ; ‘v/hioh  consists  in ‘mixing - 

p"j"'to^etlier|-a{"fus|i-ble'-“phenolio-|-oonl - 

-•  densation  produo.t  ,-  an- inert  -fill _ 

j—  l-er4--and_a-hard!enirig^lagent.l_aon-, _ 

!•— I  '-^jjiatipgLthe:  ingredients.  _to  _J_ 

: _ ! ..  .  a  blank,  iformirigjaj  surf  a  e 

)  layer  pomp'risilng  admixture- of  “1  : 

[  I  pHen|dlao-JondeMSatl6nJ“protr" 

f  |  '  au6tj-and]-a -hardendlng-ageniT  ap-  ~H 
--plying  j-the]-same-|t  o'-the-su-rf  aoe-ofj— 
f — j — — the  Jlank.j-and! -pres  sing. Lthe.Lblank  _ 

|— • — thus  formed.  jin.d_.auitable,|  matrix _ 

.  :  with !  app  1  i o  at  ijon  of  jheat  suffiq]- 
' L  ientl  to  pauie  JhjF|  ingredients  ’to 

rr  '  reaot -ana-EardWr H-Ttti - 


golio  617!-: 


filed  iAug..  1.6;, .. 
Serial. .No:.  '5.75 

Ilio.ehi 

C ondensit e :  reo ord 


iProbess  Of  forming,  rebords 
mixing!,  together  a  .fusible 


,  ,  .  in! prpduot land  a  hard 
'condensation  iproduot  'in  a 
i„A^a4i4.j  and  -molding,  the 


- jo  lent  heat  until-  plastio1.  j  fh® 

molding,;  heatingj-ho '  cause  I0'' 1  ' 
-hardening  react ion i-oo oli 
removing!  from  -mold. . 


HRRjlie 

powdered 


iPolit 


icord; 
igalj  raach: 

\J  ' 


wH1 


filed  .August:  26/10 
J.  ;\Yi_:Aylswor.th.  .  .. 

Serial. Ho..  ,579,130  ; 
Aggnd  Convene ^te  Co. 

i  MetioeL  ;of  Molding  Records  and|  I 
;  Other;  Objects1.  ;  r  - 

j  •  iHplding  Urtioles  jor  -  records , 

|  •  which1  oohslsts  :ih  ^forming  '  a  i  -j-; 

boating- of;-  a  -final-  hard  phenolic  • 

;  condensation  produot  ,;  whioh;is ■ 

:  infusible  but- somewhat  jplastio- :  • 

;  when  heate|d;  upon  the;  surface ;  of  r 
i  a  blank  mold-,- pressing  jan  •artioie- 
j  to'  bej  coated  into  -contact  with  ‘  ! 

|  the  j  coating  jih  the  mold  with  ap- ' 
i  piioapion -;of  heat  to  'cause  the  !'  j' 

opating  to:  firnily  adhehetto  }t>--‘ - 

!"  artiolpi  j'rpitoVing-  itTtep boated 
;  Orjtiold  ,i  and  “pfeSsihg:  thO'  same 


;  bau  s  ej 


'olio I  632 


filled  £ 


•pt,|  19' , 
lbeer  . 
o.  1582., 


1910 

615 


Folio  638  -  filed  Sept;  |29,-  1910 

-•  ■  '  “  t .  A.-  Ik  Petit  ■  -  . 

— ‘ \  Serial  No.- 584,458  -  - 

. r- . Asgn&.;N.|j.p.j_do.  , 

;  ... — - 

. Reoordl'anflj  pro:09BE  -of*  making- 

•  same; -  paper:  cylinder  -  shellao  - 

.  :  !■_ 


Fo 

1: 

0 

6 

>3 

- 

i 

r 

fii 

J.. 
Ser 
lie 
'Ey  - 

c;o. 

ov 

yi 

No 

s 

O'. 

ST 

tc 

4 

01 

5? 

nc 

0 

2 

0 

.1 

3! 

: 

•• 

... 

- 

p 

ol 

io 

6‘ 

■ 

- 

C 

Ci 

7. 

30 

A 

3. 

’• 

La 

V/ 

ri 

i! 

r 

\ 

No 

V. 

4 

4 

191C 

n; 

,60C 

B.'-C 

eJs 

...!.... 

; 

P. 

0 

B 

lr 

T 

■. 

C 

■!  - 

onae 

X 

Ayls 
al;  No. 
uses,  i 
-Ojo 

ff. 

er 

3. 

A 

se 

-c 

tl 

0 

.1 

-] 

0- 

a  1 

90 

N. 

.... 

rr 

56 

0 

- 

- 

... 

... 

.... 

lie 

ite 

r 

“ 

Li 

vi  si 

on 

c 

f 

ess 

of 

li 

0“ 

61 

62 

ai 

2 

ng 

- 

j 

01 

ia 

en 

Bi 

te 

- 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

... 

j- 

- 

(] 

f 

Po 

- 

... 

- 

■ 

h? 

■ 

- 

.... 

- 

___ 

l  s 

r 

“ 

~ 

r“ 

i 

“ 

L 

- 

I 

“ 

i 

“ 

“ 

“ 

” 

i 

| 

_ 

p 

.... 

i__ 

“ 

“ 

~ 

ir 

4 

L 

_ 

.... 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

= 

— 

- 

— 

__ 

/ 

1 


■  :  ;  ;  ;  ■  :  ;  i  ; 

golioi  824  -  filed  Fob!  16,!  1912' 
:  |  .  .  ;Ser.ial;Xo.  678;, 040.  i 

.  -i. . j.  ;  .  .  ,  Prank  L.l  Dyer 
•  :Asgnd  P.IaIe!.  ,  irio  .r  i 


: .  j 

i.'  !. 

ij 

fill 

i ; 

■  : 

1 1- 

I 

: 

’olio 

70 

T 

! 

"35 

y  if 
7] 
son 

nun 

,  '  1'9 
0,15 

bfi: 

.r; 

12  i 
) 

z. 

J. 

:lli. 

'1 

li 

z 

Pr 

00 

i 

J 

o-89 

ooea 

rds. 

Divi 

-Z; 

it: 

0-~ 

oj 

sior 

i-f-i 

B. 

:J-. 
■A  a 

T  ! 

? 

; 

1 

Z! 

led  Se 
N.  i-7-lS 
•V/.-Aj 
grid  -  T 

aking 

f  Poll 

z  i  :jz 

pi.; 

,094 

lavvc 

AiB-. 

phon 

0‘  49 

ZZ 

T ; 

•912- 

ph  ; 

...  .; 

■: 

I 

8 

-Z 

.j... 

..!.  i 

: 

' 

■S 

( 

D 

■  S 

0 

Pe 

r 

r 

or 

M 

I-- 

£ 

°r 

i 

A 

l 

ii'iro 

Ifiai 

with 

' 

■ 

“ 

i 

"j 

ZI 

i- 

rt 

,!I 

ce 

3) 

1 

ru 

rs 

__ 

\<s 

- 

:  ; 

•J- 

: 

V 

.  . 

z: 

z 

T  ...! 

- 

- 

: 

: 

. 

: 

: 

.1; 

: 

;z 

ZZ 

~i 

.... 

X|__ 

!  : 

.. 

I. 

i 

Jz 

... 

_ 

z 

z 

z 

z 

ZZ 

_ 

ZZ 

_ 

_ 

- 

-L-L. 

_ 

_ 

ZI 

Z_j 

__ 

ZZI 

Z 

ZZI 

I  ZZ 

- 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

.... 

— 

— 

- ■ 

1 

1 

~ 

r 

-1 

J 

J 

A.. 

... 

k 

J 

J 

i 

I 

z 

z 

z 

ztz 

I 

_ 

1 

_ 

± 

JZ 

j 

~ 

z 

- 

__ 

XJ 

tTW 

-  -  I 

-L.L 

•Folio  902  -  filoa  Ootober  26,  1912; 
•  -  :  -  •  .  Serial  ITq., 727, 829! 

57.,'  ,;a.  Baison 


■Folio  .905.  -.  filea  IIov.  ;9,  1912  . 

.  ....  Serial  Jfo..  i730,'343  ' 
T.  A.  Eaison  •  ' 


Polio  906 


filoa  Hovembor  20  *  1912 
Soria!  Ho.  732,410 
Thomas  A.  Eaison  ■ 


Method  of  making  Bub  master  ; 
diso  blanks  and  reoordB,  including 
the  means  for  making  a  vaouum  ana 


Pnl  -1  J  737 


filed  (April  20,  1911: 
Tv  !C  i  Orebriel  1  ;  i  •  ; 
Serial  Ho;.  i622;,401 
Asgnd  TJAI.B.  \  Ino' 


lamp!  plural 


golio  774  filed  iAug.  il7,i  .19X1.:. 
■  :  •  •  ;  :  ;  Serial-  No.  .644,682  .  . 

. .  A:.  ;L>  -Saltzman  : 

.  •  A'sgnfl  T.A..B. -Ino-.  . 


■  •  ;  Chain  drive- take-up: for 
motion  piotnre :maphino3. ;  • 


. . 

:  '! 

EE 

r 

:  : 

1 

.0 

E 

E 

1 

:E 

Ur 

i 

Apr 

.Eid, 

..  ;689 

E 

i  ! 

1912 

”i” 

.1 

.!. 

7: 

.  n 

6 

. 

Polio  867. 

filed: jun 

e 

>r  • 

T  7 .3 

7|»f 

9 

12 

Pc 

file 

d 

81 

■e 

.  Ser 

ial  lie 
C..:.Gxe 
nd:  I..A 

I..:.;.. 

produi 
,by  -oi 

Ids 

s 

1 

i 

eri 

3i 

10 

IS 

; 

59 

: 

: 

. .  Hetho 

.  :  moving-  pio 
.  .  jeotion.  • 

.  A8g 

6fi 

bures 

. 

i 

t 

4 

lg  -S 
Loal 

ino. . 

mall.  . 
pro-. 

/*> 

EE 

1 

M 

l: 

i 

3 

u. 

ne 

r 

1; 

- 

. 

•  "  ;  T*  ■  . 

:.r 

- 

77 

■ 

E 

j  L  T-.— j . 

- 

E 

- 

■■ 

,j_j 

_ 

... 

_ 

■■ 

■ 

- 

... 

- 

... 

- 

- 

. 

... 

... 

- 

E 

‘  1 — i — 1 — t — t — !  ’  'T- 

- r* 

- 

- 

H— 

— 

— 

— 1 L 

1 

7 

— 

7 

H 

~ 

~ 

7 

~ 

ij 

Ti 

$ 

Tl 

-Hh 

4--| — j'  -  r  ■ 

l  r 

frf.  .. .. 

.U„  ..... 

-j- 

- 

- 

L- 

-t|- 

E 

e: 

-E 

- 

- 

- 

E 

E 

E 

E 

: 

E 

E 

E 

E 

I 

E 

E 

... 

E 

I 

rrjirL^j: 

4- 

i- 

E 

I 

E 

IT 

E 

E 

e: 

: 

§ 

7 

7- 

- 

1 

7 

7 

- 

1 

:: 

7 

1 

1 

I 

1 

1 

E 

1 

1 

E 

E 

E 

E 

T 

:=: 

77 

£ 

; 

- 

“ 

it 

= 

= 

1 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

I 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

: 

_ 

: 

f 

Folio  903  -"filed  0ot.:  28,  1912 
'  -  Serial'  Ho.  728,370 

:  I.  A.  Edison  -■ 


.■  Colored  pioture  projection 
apparatus*  (Divisional  appln . 
see  folio  "  )  • 


Folio  904  filed  iOot.  20,  1912; 

. :  ■  Serial  Ho;  728,393 

.  \  R.  Hutohison. 

Asgnd  T.;A.;E/,  Ino. 


: Acetylene;  Burner  safoty  valve 

for  Home  P.K.  . 

.  iMeana: for:  cutting  off  the  gas 
from ! tank  when  gas  is  turned  off 
at  burner. 


p.-!  A.  Edison 

Storage;  Battery  Eleotrode 
,  ...»  ori  less-  ofi  bismuth  oxide  ad< 
ed  to  nickel  hydroxide,  or  15$ 

•  -of  imetallip  -bismuth-;added-rto -  > 
L_nidhel  i.hydroxide:..  ;  !  i _ 


r  m 


n 


!  Storage 
burrs  from 
ar:e' 


.  grinding  the 
.lid!  strips  which-' 


batter; 

install! . ,  _ _ . 

r  pockets.'  ' 


I'Jiily'  1“,T: 
Serial  Ho.  £69 
’•Edison  ••!• 


t 


!  Folio  743  i-| 


i 


file  i 

t..  !aI 

Seri i 


.  .  i  ;Prooess  ;of 
•lioj  copper  from  . 
metals i associated 
which  consists  j:  ' 
associated  meta! 
jtion  -of  animonr 
jtaining  a ‘redubij 


ing' 


to  the 


separating  . 
other,1  metal: 

jtrierewith 
•  |treatiri| ' 
with  la| ; 
sulphate 
file  jhaioid 
heating,1  and  isupplyin 


mixtu: 


...  mi; 

..  ‘Edison; 

,ai  So..  .626,298 


-  filed1  Hay  18,  ‘  1911 
Soria-l  : IT o . ■  62!7,‘995 
A.1  Edison  !  •  ; ■  • 


;  Separating- oopp'er  from  metallic: 
‘niolj-el  associated:  therewith,  ■ 

:  which 'consists  in' treating ‘the;  •  • 

1  associated Imotals1  with  a  solution- 
'  o:f ; copper;  sulphate  'containing  :  -  1 
;  c,upric  ohloride;  arid' simultaneous - 
;  l:y; stirring,'  heatjiiig'  and  Supply-  : 
i  brt  oxygeh  hontc-iihi'ng  has' to  ; 
the  mixture.;  '  1  1  ‘  v  ■  •  1  • 


'  J-! 


L  759-  r...f iled  ..June :  SI.,  19.11  . 
....  Serial  ITo.;  634,428.  . 
.  II. ;  Hut ohi:s on.  : 

:  Asgnd.E;.  S.3.:  Co.  1 


•  Safety.. devices  for :  storage  :  ... 
•'+er-ies  -  tp-.-prevont-explosione ,  ■ 


■io  762  -..filed.  July.  6>'.  lgii  : 

•  Serial.  Ho.  637,177  . 

•  I.I.R.  -Hutohison . : 

•  •  Asgnd  E.-S.3-.  ;Co.-  • 


'  •  'Method-  of • charging  storage  •  • 
batteries  ,•  v/hic-h  rconsists  in--  . 

dividing -the  battery:  in-  three  • 

groups,-  connecting- two  of -the  -  . 

groups  in  sorie's,-  charging- to  -  - 

one-half  -oapaoity,-  then1  ■  donned  t- . -• 

ing  -one-  of  -  said:  group  and -the--  :  ■  i 
third  -  group  :in-  series  :and  charg-  ":  ; 
ing  ‘\in til  the  i  said*  groups  are1  — 
'*ull*y  charged ;  and  half  -  charged"  ;  ;  : 
respectively, ; and  then  Wnnebt-rLH 
ing  -the:  two  half  Tcharged  grouper"-' 
in:  series  and  !  fully"  ‘ohargihg:  the  ' 
'same,  1  •;  • ;  r  j- j 


i  '  ffolid  771  ■  filed  ;  July  -29  ,-'1911 
i  :  :  ;  Serial- IToV  :  641 ,326 

:  .  ;  ‘  :  :  JV  !'V/i.  lAyl-swortli :  :  - 

"  ■  ;  ;  i'li'oahde  j "t'o  ';E  VST.TT.  P<j  7 


An  instilatingj  (compound  con-'' 
..  Gaining  an. oxidation  product  of 
i  iqhlprinated.;  naphthalene.  ■  ' 


golio  ;  785  r  ifilpd,’.  Sei?t’Vj2B,!'  1911  V 
■ ;  .Serio.'l.lTp.;  .65.1  J 69.7  ■  ' 

rr  :  •  •  •- i  Kv-R.;  .Hutqhisjojj.  i.'i  ■  T 


RTR 


•Cliarsine-  storage;  b'att.'i 
'-the  -currant! 

'  r 


rn: 


.or.ies  i__L 

'  lero-  ! 

Ir1' 


m 


/,} 


w 
& 


\ 


filed  March 
Serial  No.  61 
H.;  E.  Hut o hi: 
Asgiid  E.’S.B'. 


.  .  .Pressure,  indicating.  and  con-  ' 
trolling  means  fori  storage:  bat¬ 
teries  (improvement  .on  Polio  797)’ 

.  Switoh  in  charging. circuit!  adapted 
to. be;released  when  batteries  are 
fully ; charged. 


19 


;  filed  j)eo:.  '22 ,!  19i. 
j Serial  if  o'.  '667j,366 
;A.  jBdisoh;  '!  i  ' 


!.  ptoralge  bctte;ry. 

■  Ao.iijvd  material:  fo*  storage 
.  tory  electrode  iconoisting  of  , 
:  mixture  of  finely  divided  non! 
pyrophoric,  iron  and  jmeroury.1 


v- 


1 


Eoli'o  ! 801  r  iiled  Oct.  21',  l&ll' 
'  1  ...  ;  Serial jir'o.  655,902 

.  Edison  .  .  . 


Cement  Kiln.: 


.  ..  !  The  ;use;  of.  an! oil  burner  .  . 
and  spreader,  for  pulverized  . 
fuel,  i  i  _ 

j-  •  •!  Using. the  oil  i burner- as: 
in.  auxiliary,  to !  neat,  up  kiln.  .  . 

35%!  ajnthraoit'e -and  ■ 

fuel  will  ignite: 


!  so. that: the  . 
:  65%  hituminoi 
■  more!  readily!, 


■Polio  .805.  -  filed.  3eo..  1,  lOlli 

. Thomas  !A.  Edison!  i 

■  :  •  Serial  ilo..  663,399:. 

aiv.  of  folio- 34 ■ 


Car:  sikip  hoist. 


•M-h-f-i 


!.  1  ■.  IQ 


;il 


■Folio  021  ■  -•  f ilG'd  ■  Jan .  30 ,  1912 
"  '  ' Serial  No. • 674,274 • 
. 1 '  A!.  'Edison  :  •  •  • 


Concrete'  furniture  -  making' 
chairs,  etc.  in  'sections'  of 
'demerit '  reinforced  -  with' piping.  ' 


•T 

; 

!P 

: 

oil 

ol 

4£ 

;;;rr 

--1  nn 

Ser 

in 

otifiei 
varyir 
per  lo'c 

t 

I 

5d  Oo 
l.  Ea 

r 

!• 

t. 

is 

3. 

- 

;■ 

w 

30 

7 

on 

5 

‘i 

35 

o'. 

1 

at 

L9 

,7 

;h 

dt 

p 

58 

io 

n 

-i  • 

!  j. 

f ! 

Eolic 

5 

it 

;r 

Ci 

d. 

3e 

ap 

le 

C 

ri 

** 

on 

h- 

a  o 

.  D 

a*' 

ii 

Ln- 

ot. 

ura 

i,o. 

N._J 

lU 

ore 

nd 

Si 

6 

8“ 

a 

-t 

- 

0 

)U 

ii 

..  i 

M 

1 

0 

san 

eng 

f-a 

sif 

th- 

ie 

19: 

: 

Lai 

a 

S 

ro 

N 

Co 

it' 

nee 

. 

■ 

a 

heo 

phoi 

... 

it 

10 

,3 

Cc 

hi 

» 

t- 

; 

... 

... 

~ 

! 

nf 

3.1 

\ 

n 

ro 

Lt 

ag 

and 

°3 

ol 

6£ 

t 

.. 

L 

...j 

__ 

r 

l 

1- 

.... 

... 

... . 

..... 

... 

... 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

L 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

__ 

... 

__ 

_ 

__ 

.... 

- 

:: 

.... 

■■  • 

- 

- 

- 

~ 

- 

— 

5| 

- 

- 

& 

’S- 

s 

t'JkCl 

- 

- 

. 

- 

— 

~x 

r 

c 

i 

wv 

"1 

i 

~s 

- 

- 

S 

r~ 

Vs 

v 

~ 

J 

r 

~~ 

j 

■ 

- 

- 

— 

— 

- 

.... 

- 

i 

..... 

I 

- 

- 

.... 

_ 

_ 

i 

i 

£ 

I 

= 

— 

— 

_ 

i 

-L- 

z 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

J, 

7 

'  Polio:  829  '-  'filed  Ileiroh'  21',  1912 


Voltage  regulation  for' h'ou. 
lighting; system  froni  battery. ; 


Polio  '051  -  filed'  :£ardh:  22;  1912  ' 
.  ;  ;  !  ;  I  :  Serial  ;ir'o.'  68‘5;542  '  i 

;  i  ;  !  ;  ;  j  f A.!  Midoh  '  "'  i  '  "i 


■  stora'ge  battery  wagin'  (sbcorid; 
.  tfonstruotldn;). :  • .  I  j  '  lv'i  ’ 


1 


1  Cohtkot  adapted  to  'd'isi 
“  heat  *-> 


■in  rectifiers said; 


being '  oonib-shaped'. 

mj:  j 


T;  A.r  Edison  : 

Piled  June  13‘,  1912 
Serial  :JTo.;  703, >368  ■ 


■  i  - ; 


Bipatje'i 


Tj";  i. 


-|-L 

:  ■  | 

■■  |  -  r  ■ 

:[;[ 

■  i-j- 

■  !'  LLj 

- 

!::FF; 

\.si 

I±j~ 

-  ri~: 

:;rr| 

: 

__j_L 

.  j'V'j 

±;:|: 

tfolio  876  r  filed  July  Sj,'19l2' 
.  .  .  i  .  ;  :  .Serial!  No.  712,591  . 

.Thomas; A... Ediispn!  ; 


■  Starting  ideviae .  for  automobiles. 
Compound  lnol;or  generator.  !  Using  ; 
the  -series. winding;  for  motor  and  .  . 
the -shunt  winding  for . generator L  . 
Splitting  the. battery • so  :that !  ; 
while,  one  half  is  being,  discharged . 
the -other  half  will  :be  charged  from 
the  -generator-.  :  i  ;  !  ■  ■  \  ■  • 


+ 


I : 

44 

> 

1 

...: 

r' 

4'1 

. 

- 

Fo 

ll 

0 

6 

7 

_ 

fdi 

9a 

p 

eb 

16 

,1 

93 

1 

;  :p 

oli'o  ‘6 

34 

filed  Sept. r I 
Serial' No ;  58 
lud son'  &'  Elina 
/Vsgha'  Ea'ison 

,  1910 
2,608  ; 

:fg.Oo; 

4 

A 

S 

A 

4* 

3gn& 

8 

1 

altz 

No. 

E.K. 

ma 

6S 

n 

7 

0. 

7/ 

5 

■  -  i 

.  ! 

;  . 

;  : 

■ :  \  * 

Primary  'battery 
uoe;a  {portion  j  adapt  e 

vi  th ; 
a  -to  ; 

vear  ; 

.4 

prii 

a: 

T 

Je 

b 

1! 

be 

siisp 

ry. 

erisi 

' 

01 

-- 

nro.ugi 

Lty 

!  4 
j  ! 

’0 

•nnwfl 

•; 

1 

•  :X 

' 

■  ■  \u 
.  :  ! 
i 

j'  4 

: 

: 

f 

r 

4. 

. 

- 

. 

■ 

4 

- 

_ 

. 

... 

... 

... 

■ 

: 

:  J 

S-L 

““*r 

- 

... 

i-j 

*7- 

i 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

44 

. 

.4 

f 

f 

: 

" 

- 

44 

44 

4] 

- 

- 

- 

- 

... 

- 

... 

- 

. ;. 

.... 

/ 

j- 

-  i-- 

-r-f 

— 

— 

| 

• 

■ 

± 

I 

•  ; " 

... 

I 

‘  , 

7 

ST\ 

! 

| 

:  4- 

V 

- 

1 

4 

- 

' 

i 

- 

- 

1 

3 

1 

- 

- 

:: 

1 

I 

I 

:: 

44 

: 

I 

I 

- 

“ 

I 

- 

- 

: 

- 

- 

— 

— 

- 

~T 

- 

- 

- 

X 

- 

- 

J- 

-j 

- 

- 

- 

- 

-- 

__ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

. 

!  j 

[ 

J 

LX 

if 

'± 

: 

1 

........ 

7 

7 

7 

1 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 

- 

- 

= 

: 

: 

... 

:j: 

4- 

1 

t 

- 

1 

:: 

I 

I 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

: 

.::tt 

i . 

x: 

_ 

_ 

r  1 

_ 

L 

L 

X 

I 

X 

3 

41 

14;; 

- 

!... 

_ 

_ 

__ 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

= 

= 

- 

X 

7 

•  polio:  889  ’filed  Aug;  -31 1*  1912;  : 
■  :  ~  •  S'.  >TT'i"  717i 994  ;  :  1  ; 

V7.  E;  Holland  ;  •  ;  :  ■ 
. iAngna  T.'AiE.  i  Ino ;  •  • 


Primary  battery  -  muljtipl'S  pl^tje 
!  (Division  'of  Polio!  559  );  ;  ! 


mm 

m 


% 


•Aug-.  26,-  1910' 
Aylsv/ortH  • 

!  Ho;  1579,129  ; 


i  MetHo'd  :of  ■Kolding  'Object's  ’  I  ;  : 
Haying  Hefraotory  Surfaoe  layer.’  ] 


i  MetHod  lof  'molding  -articles' ,  ' 
whioHi  oprisis'ts  'in  'forming" a  j  :  i  :  ' 
transparent  doating  lof  a  : filial  ! 
Hard  pH'eridlio  i  obriderisat'idni  pro -I  • 
duot'  upon  the  'surface;  of  ja;  mold;,  J_  ■ 
ippiyin'g  iai  design .  or^ploti' 

jhereip:,  ;forming.jr  - "* -•* 

'bathing  of!  a  fina: 


. . .  j  ondbrisati  on' pro. duo  tj  jdpbp  _gaid.  J 
.es.ign ,i .dnd  pressing,  with .. appli 
ration  ;of  jiela.t .  |tii. a*$ioae_ jboi ,tie.i. . i  .! 


. .  .  . an. 

. ..  irfap  ejd_.i  iptp_io.pii' 
roatriz_tHus  .boat  a  i 


ploture_ 

I-,  proi'eptiye 
il;  Hard!  phenol-1  .. 


•Etiole.tP. 

(tapt.;_w'ithutHe_. 


'  1 


T 

T 

1 

i  j 

!■  i- 

r  - 

' 

T 

” 

■■■ 

. 

... 

.... 

... 

... 

\ 

r 

j 

i  4 

•j . 

1  ii 

! 

1 

"!  ,1 

Pol 

K 

1 

324 

- 

filed 

j.  ;v.r. 

|a 

[A 

..  |... 

I 

1C 

....j... 

... 

uf  •  I .2 

/Is  wo 

6; 

rth 

19 

0] 

io 

-  f 

ile 

d 

or 

k. 

i 

n 

T 

1 1 

i 

.. 

Jl. 

J: 

risv 

03 

•tl 

1 

...j. 

° 

!° 

m 

- 

...jt 

Be 

Th 

om 

ix 

us 

le 

lie 

ea 

ea 

nS 

license 
lino..  & .. 

3. 

to" 

S.B 

tTa 

.;C 

E 

!>. 

: 

-■ 

-- 

- 

-S 

-E> 

iila 

o|on 

M." 

TI 

see 

Go 

-  t< 

-  ar 

d 

E 

s 

c 

-B 

rG 

"  1 

ar 

f!0 

s 

pc 

in 

ib 

■e 

ti 

ri 

;e 

c 

i 

r 

P 

S 

1 

f 

n 

S! 

01 

ig| 
nip 
ro,c 
Lt'i 
SX 
P 
3  on 

ri 

5  i 
a 
ide 

Qo 

S 

ps 

on 

3P 

ne 

ta 

in 

nti 

nd 

nsi 

np|c 
3  an 
3.jc 

J 

10,1 

ini 

die 

■ea 

3  a 
pe 

iti 

sii 

I’i 

iob 

ff 

ire 

PS 

sir 

oti 

>0 

rmi 

on 

:.o 

or 

0 

it 

si 

ha 

ed 

on 

Id 

tt 

pr 

ni 

>r 

i. 

:d 

P 

P 

in 

)d 

and 

ng. 

sis 

fre 

and 

eni 

rop 

g  a 
uot 

i  ... 

Ti 

.1 

ili 

io: 

;e. 

“P 

0 

!- 

h 

.... 

! 

]"  ■ 

.... 

~ 

Pr 

a  jb 
ts 
e  Ip 
a 

“Sr 

ort 

era 

iou 

lia 

-to 

DC 

3a 

in 

is 

ne 

as 

L0 

tu 

31 

rd 

e 

6E 

I" 

fc] 

er 

rc 

y-i 

er 

n£ 

s 

. 

t 

u 

9.; 

X 

fi 

'0 

-f 

3r 

ns 

31 

D'fi 

Dr 

at 

_b 

ill 

QS 

le 

n- 

er 

7- 

ati 
"an 
lS*8 
3  or 

% 

tji'o 

i?ai 

a  ? 

oon 

fill 

S3 

Si 

lpOE 

ii 

i 

Dn 

- 

-C 

“1 

4 

-l 

1 

lb] 
f  o'< 
is-i 
ano 
-vu! 

e 

VC 

Oj 

01 

h£ 

tr 

f: 

DOT 

m 

L. 

ir 

-ii 

•e 

in 

z 

a" 

.- 

id 

5& 

g 

en 

in 

)0 

1 

- 

-r. 

ib 

;  5  n 

h 

-ii 

, 

I 

- 

- 

- 

- 

z. 

-- 

n 

11 

:i 

- 

- 

- 

- 

I 

- 

~ 

- 

- 

-■ 

-- 

■ 

-| 

-■ 

■  ■  ■! 

— 

“ 

~ 

___ 

! 

“ 

— 

“ 

“ 

J 

. 

I 

I 

r. 

:: 

- 

... . 

;ii 

Ii 

r 

: 

: 

' 

I 

■f, 

— 

□ 

. 

illl 

"■ 

:  j 

-'-I 

II 

i 

" 

i  ii 

ii 

-i . 

I 

III 

□ 

J 

t 

b 

Lt 

t 

— 

__ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

Z[ 

4_ 

Z\: 

I[... 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

__ 

7 

Folio  662  -  filed  Nov.  4,  1910 
i  “J.i  W.  lAylswortlf 
:  Serial]  No. :  590,601  I 
•  licenses. ioiNiPi . Co. 

.  .L.E.M.i .Co,',  iarid'BlSiBi 
. Ob,  :  . ; 

Plastio  composition  and  method  • 
-of-making  the  -same.-j— •Rubber-oom-;- 
.pounded,  with1  phenolic,  ioondensation 
.  product.:  !  ;  I  '!  ■  jj  j  |  [_ ! 


a 


. 

Folic 

; 

9 

L 

-■ 

fi 

Pi 

30 

le 

A 

ri 

" 

L 

il 

Ja 

n. 

ox 

6 

... 

7 

04 

Ou 

-n 

or 

-] 

ha 

ap 

ph 

5 

2 

- 

h- 

ou 

1 

S' 

oom 

•tha 

-sub 

po 

le 

st 

- 

Edis 

No. 

- 

ai 

d 

0€ 

II 

01 

ia 

-] 

1ST 

cec 

il 

ll 

e 

e 

it 

;r 

if 

a 

.... 

•h 

bh 

%  pomp 
ihloiro 
-an-am 

r 

r 

... 

L_ 

r 

z 

f' 

!.l 

i_... 

rr 

i- 

... 

_ 

.... 

_ 

Z 

_ 

__ 

__ 

_ 

_ 

__ 

z 

z 

z 

~~ 

1 

Polio'  706  -  filed  Maroh  10',  1911 ' 

- -  1  Serial  Ho.  613,576  ' 

'  '  '  '  'J '.XI.  AylBworth ' 

||  License  |to  |T ; A. E. ,  | 

|  -Ino|. 


-i  filed  iliarjoti.  8 ;  19? 
!  serial  iro;,. !  6'p.g ,  i" 

J[.  iff;.  ;Ayls worth, 
Assn.ed  I.jA.Ej.  1  1 


||  j  Condensite.. 

.  Method  of  molding  hollow  ;  . 
objects. .  .  Usirig  |a.  oore  of.  fusible . 
material: and  me.lt ing  out. the  same  ; 
after;  the  object .  is  ;formed.  ! 


od  .of. .molding. ; 

baoking  :of  hard  .plai 
and:  two  thin 


of  j  oondeiisite 


hard  v/heri  obld.: 
fabiiio  -between  each  -surfai 
land  fa-brio 


soft  ..wliei 


-t  Gr¬ 
and 


i 


1 


Tlirc 

ioi'df 


fori  _ab  ids'  and  ohem: 


;  :;e 

j'j. 


a-??. 

Serial, 
lioensei 
Edison’ 
Edison 
and  Ed: 
tyorks . 


u 

Mar oh  2 
Miller! 
No. | 


.,.6111,823. 
to  N.E.j  C> 
Mfg.  Co.  ,  !  . 

'St or'.;  Bat; V  pel 
.sonl  Phonograj 


Eoiio  853  -  tiled!  liar  i  j 

f-" ;  :  serial.  Ho.;  699,109;  , 

.  Eliomas  ;A.  Edisqn;  . , 


. : Method  of!  .qono!entrating.;Ore,s. 
Separating,  the  conoentrat.es ,  I  raida.. 

.  lings, and  tailings  j  by,  a:  regulated, 
stream  of  water.  1  •  •  •  i  ••  ;  !  • 


iusmi 


) 

vs  ■ ! 


■ky 


DOCUMENT  FILE  SERIES 


The  Document  File  is  primarily  a  collection  of  incoming  letters  addressed 
to  Edison.  The  letters  frequently  contain  notations  by  Edison  or  his  secretaries 
indicating  the  nature  of  the  reply.  Drafts  and  copies  of  outgoing  letters  can  also 
be  found  in  this  file,  along  with  a  variety  of  other  documents,  such  as 
memoranda,  reports,  and  agreements. 

Most  of  the  items  in  this  collection  were  initially  part  of  Edison's  own 
correspondence  files,  which  were  maintained  by  his  secretaries  and  stored  in 
a  series  of  cardboard  "letter  boxes."  After  Edison's  death,  the  documents  were 
transferred  by  archivists  into  folders  and  reorganized  within  each  year 
according  to  subjects.  Other  items,  not  part  of  the  original  correspondence  files, 
were  subsequently  added  to  the  collection.  In  addition,  some  of  Edison's 
correspondence  was  removed  from  the  Document  File  and  transferred  by 
archivists  to  other  record  groups.  An  example  is  the  correspondence  relating 
to  Edison's  search  for  sources  of  nickel  for  his  alkaline  storage  battery.  Those 
letters  can  now  be  found  in  the  records  of  the  Mining  Exploration  Co.  of  New 
Jersey. 

The  Document  File  for  1 899-1 91 0  contains  a  substantially  larger  amount 
of  non-Edison  correspondence  than  for  earlier  years.  For  example,  there  are 
numerous  letters  addressed  to  William  E.  Gilmore,  who  served  until  1908  as 
president  of  the  National  Phonograph  Co.  and  the  Bates  Manufacturing  Co., 
as  vice  president  of  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Co.,  and  as  general  manager  of 
the  Edison  Phonograph  Works.  In  addition,  there  are  numerous  memoranda 
and  carbon  copies  of  Gilmore's  outgoing  correspondence.  During  the  1990s, 
most  of  the  correspondence  relating  to  the  National  Phonograph  Co.  was 
removed  from  the  Document  File  and  organized  by  archivists  into  a  separate 
record  group.  Nonetheless,  a  considerable  amount  of  Gilmore’s 
correspondence  remains  in  the  Document  File,  particularly  in  the  "Battery, 
Primary,"  "Edison  Manufacturing  Company,"  and  "Motion  Pictures"  folders! 
Similarly,  many  of  the  folders  for  1 908-1 91 0  contain  items  from  the  office  files 
of  Frank  L.  Dyer,  general  counsel  of  the  Legal  Department,  who  succeeded 
Gilmore  as  the  head  of  Edison’s  enterprises  in  August  1908.  In  addition,  there 
are  numerous  letters  to  and  from  Edison's  secretaries— John  F.  Randolph  and 
his  successor,  Harry  F.  Miller— and  other  company  and  laboratory  employees. 


Many  of  the  letters  for  1 899-1 91 0  relate  to  the  technical  and  commercial 
development  of  phonographs,  motion  pictures,  and  storage  batteries.  There  are 
also  items  concerning  the  legal  and  financial  dealings  of  the  Edison 
companies,  particularly  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Co.  and  the  Edison 
Phonograph  Works.  Among  the  phonograph-related  items  are  descriptions  of 
the  Works,  memoranda  regarding  experimentation  and  model  changes,  and 
correspondence  involving  protracted  litigation  over  sales  rights.  The  material 
on  motion  pictures  includes  references  to  production  and  marketing,  copyright 
and  censorship  issues,  and  experimentation  with  colored  film  and  talking 
pictures.  The  battery-related  correspondence  pertains  to  the  technical 
development  and  the  domestic  and  foreign  exploitation  of  Edison's  alkaline 
storage  battery,  which  he  introduced  in  1901  and  continued  to  improve 
throughout  the  decade.  Included  are  items  regarding  possible  applications  of 
the  cells,  particularly  in  automobiles  and  other  electric  vehicles.  In  addition, 
there  are  letters  and  other  documents  concerning  the  New  Jersey  Patent  Co  ’ 
a  patent-holding  company  organized  in  1903;  the  increasing  centralization  of 
Edison’s  businesses  under  the  administrative  aegis  of  the  Legal  Department 
and  the  Manufacturing  and  Executive  Committees;  and  the  formation  of 
business  associations  or  pools  with  the  Edison  Portland  Cement  Co 's 
competitors  and  with  motion  picture  producers  and  distributors. 

During  the  period  1899-1910  Edison  received  an  increasing  number  of 
unsolicited  letters  from  aspiring  inventors,  individuals  seeking  autographs  or 
charitable  contributions,  and  others  writing  in  response  to  published  accounts 
of  Edison's  inventions,  opinions,  or  experiences.  Edison  responded  to  some  of 
these  letters  with  marginal  notations,  in  which  he  expresses  his  views  on  topics 
such  as  religion  and  spiritualism,  hearing  impairment,  aviation  and  aerial 
navigation,  and  wireless  telegraphy.  Other  marginal  responses  indicate  his 
plans  for  a  poured  concrete  house  and  his  recollections  of  the  details  of  his 
early  years.  In  addition,  there  are  items  from  clubs  and  societies  to  which 
Edison  belonged  or  which  tried  to  interest  him  in  their  activities,  along  with 
letters  from  journalists,  entrepreneurs,  and  organizers  of  expositions  and  trade 
shows.  Edison  also  received  a  substantial  amount  of  correspondence  from  the 
general  public  as  a  result  of  his  solicitations  for  information  about  the  location 
of  gold  dry  placer  mines  (1901-1904)  and  inexpensive  supplies  of  cobalt  ore 
(1906-1907). 

There  are  also  some  letters  relating  to  Edison's  personal  finances  and 
family  affairs.  The  "Edison,  T.A.  -  Family"  folders  contain  numerous  letters 


about  the  personal  and  financial  difficulties  of  Edison's  sons,  Thomas  A. 
Edison,  Jr.,  and  William  Leslie  Edison,  as  well  as  the  interests  and  activities  of 
his  second  wife,  Mina  Miller  Edison,  and  other  members  of  his  immediate  and 
extended  family.  The  "Glenmont"  and  "Fort  Myers"  folders  contain  items 
pertaining  to  Edison’s  home  in  Llewellyn  Park  and  his  winter  home  in  Florida. 

The  items  in  the  Document  File  are  arranged  by  year  and  are  subdivided 
within  each  year  according  to  broad  subject  categories.  Many  of  those 
categories  relate  to  technologies  such  as  phonographs,  storage  batteries,  and 
motion  pictures.  Although  most  Edison  companies  are  categorized  as 
subentries  within  a  particular  technology,  a  few  companies  appear  as  main 
entries,  generally  because  their  activities  embraced  several  technologies  or 
because  they  remained  distinct  from  other  Edison  interests.  Examples  include 
the  Edison  Manufacturing  Co.  and  the  New  Jersey  Patent  Co.  Related  material 
regarding  the  business  of  Edison's  various  companies  can  be  found  in  the 
Company  Records  Series. 

Documents  that  deal  with  more  than  one  subject  or  that  do  not  fall  under 
any  of  the  technology  categories  are  filed  in  "Edison,  T.A.  -  General." 
Researchers  interested  in  a  particulartopic  should  always  consult  "Edison,  T.A. 
-  General"  and  the  various  other  "General"  folders  in  addition  to  more  specific 
subcategories  relating  to  their  interests. 

Letters  pertaining  to  various  Edison  technologies  can  also  be  found  in 
other  folders  throughout  the  Document  File.  For  example,  the  "Patents"  folders 
contain  correspondence  to  and  from  Edison's  patent  attorneys  and  agents.  A 
letter  concerning  the  assignment  of  a  particular  phonograph  patent  would  be 
found  in  the  "Patents"  folder  rather  than  a  "Phonograph"  folder.  Other  folders 
that  frequently  contain  technology-related  material  include  "Edison,  T.A.  - 
Articles,"  "Exhibitions,"  and  "West  Orange  Laboratory." 

Undated  documents  pose  an  especially  difficult  organizational  problem, 
since  the  archival  filing  system  for  the  Document  File  requires  the  attribution 
of  a  year  to  each  item  prior  to  its  placement  in  a  subject  folder.  Undated 
documents  selected  for  publication  appear  within  the  year  attributed  by  the 
archivists,  unless  there  is  compelling  evidence  that  the  attribution  is  erroneous. 

All  documents  that  received  a  substantive  response  from  Edison  have 
been  selected,  together  with  other  letters  that  contain  significant  information 


about  Edison,  his  laboratory  and  business  associates,  and  their  activities.  In 
cases  where  Edison  made  the  same  reply  to  numerous  correspondents,  or 
where  large  numbers  of  similar  documents  present  repetitive  information,  a 
representative  sample  has  been  selected  for  publication.  Dockets, 
endorsements,  and  other  secretarial  markings  appearing  on  the  backs  of 
letters  have  not  been  selected,  except  when  they  contain  important  information 
not  appearing  on  the  document  itself.  Enclosures  and  attachments  appear  after 
the  items  they  accompany. 

Incoming  correspondence  and  other  unbound  documents  can  also  be 
found  in  the  Company  Records  Series,  Legal  Series,  and  Special  Collections 
Series. 


DOCUMENT  FILE  SERIES 


1899 


1899.  Edison,  T.A.  -  General  (D-99-01) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  relating  to  a  variety  of  subjects.  Included  are  documents 
that  deal  with  more  than  one  subject  or  that  do  not  fall  under  the  main  subject  categories  in  the 
Document  File.  Among  the  items  for  1899  are  letters  from  longtime  Edison  associates,  Edward  H. 
Johnson  and  Sigmund  Bergmann. 

1899.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Clubs  and  Societies  (D-99-02) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  Edison's  membership 
and  activities  in  clubs  and  professional  societies. 

1899.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Employment  (D-99-03)  [not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  routine  correspondence  from  or  about  employees  and  former  or 
prospective  employees.  Most  of  the  items  are  requests  for  employment  at  the  West  Orange 
laboratory.  Also  included  is  an  enumerated  list  of  laboratory  employees. 

1899.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Family  (D-99-04) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  concerning  Edison's  family. 
Included  are  items  regarding  the  business  activities  of  William  Leslie  Edison  and  Thomas  A.  Edison, 


1899.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Financial  (D-99-05)  [not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  routine  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  Edison's 
personal  finances.  Included  are  items  pertaining  to  the  purchase  and  sale  of  bonds,  a  statement  of 
the  tax  due  on  the  estate  of  John  Kruesi,  and  routine  letters  from  J.P.  Morgan  &  Co.  concerning 
payment  of  the  monthly  stipend  provided  by  Edison  to  his  daughter,  Marion  Edison  Oeser. 

1899.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Unsolicited  Correspondence  - 
General  (D-99-06)  [not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  unsolicited  letters  to  Edison  regarding  personal  and  business  matters. 
Included  are  requests  for  advice  on  technical  matters  and  requests  for  Edison's  assistance  in 
improving  or  promoting  inventions.  Other  items  concern  requests  for  Edison's  investment  in,  or 
contribution  to,  various  financial  ventures.  No  record  of  a  significant  response  by  Edison  has  been 
found  for  any  of  these  items. 

1899.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Unsolicited  Correspondence  - 
Foreign  Language  (D-99-07)  [not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  foreign-language  letters  to  Edison  that  have  not  been  translated  into 
English.  Unsolicited  foreign-language  documents  accompanied  by  translations  or  English-language 
summaries  can  be  found  in  the  "Edison,  T.A.  -  Unsolicited  Correspondence  -  General"  folder. 

1899.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Visitors  (D-99-08)  [not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  letters  of  introduction  and  requests  to  visit  Edison  or  to  tour  his  West 
Orange  laboratory.  Substantive  letters  from  individuals  who  visited  the  laboratory  or  company  shops 
on  business  can  be  found  in  the  appropriate  subject  folders. 


1899.  Edison  Manufacturing  Company  (D-99-09) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  the  business  of  the 
Edison  Manufacturing  Co.  Included  are  items  pertaining  to  the  use  of  Edison's  signature  as  a 
registered  trademark  and  to  the  use  of  phonoplex  circuits  by  Western  Union.  Also  included  is  a 
statement  of  the  company's  assets  as  of  March  1, 1899,  submitted  by  William  E.  Gilmore,  general 
manager.  Other  items  in  the  Document  File  relating  to  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Co.  can  be  found 
in  D-99-15  (Motion  Pictures). 

1899.  Edison-Saunders  Compressed  Air  Company  (D-99-10) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  concerning  the  patents  possessed 
or  considered  for  purchase  by  the  Edison-Saunders  Compressed  Air  Co.  relating  to  the  development 
of  a  pneumatic  motor.  Included  is  a  letter  from  William  L.  Saunders  of  the  Ingersoll-Sergeant  Drill 
Co.  to  Walter  S.  Mallory  of  the  New  Jersey  and  Pennsylvania  Concentrating  Works  evaluating 
existing  patents.  Also  included  is  a  statement  of  company  accounts  for  the  period  1899-1904. 

1899.  Electric  Light  (D-99-11) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  electric  lighting  and 
power.  Included  are  items  attesting  to  Edison's  continued  relations  with  the  General  Electric  Co.  and 
the  Edison  Electric  Illuminating  Co.  of  New  York. 

1899.  Fort  Myers  (D-99-12) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  Edison's  home  and 
property  at  Fort  Myers,  Florida.  Included  are  items  pertaining  to  the  repair,  shingling,  and  painting 
of  the  house,  and  an  undated  memorandum  regarding  a  steamship  and  railroad  freight  route  to  Fort 
Myers. 


1899.  Glenmont  (D-99-13)  [not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  documents  relating  to  the  furnishing  and  maintenance  of  Glenmont, 
Edison's  home  in  Llewellyn  Park.  There  are  three  items  for  1899:  an  agreement  with  E.  H.  Harrison 
&  Bro.  of  Newark  for  plumbing  work;  a  memorandum  pertaining  to  the  payment  of  a  C.O.D.  bill;  and 
a  memorandum  regarding  coal  purchased  for  the  house  and  outbuildings. 

1899.  Mining  (D-99-14) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  mining  and  ore  milling. 
Many  of  the  letters  were  written  in  response  to  reports  of  Edison's  interest  in  developing  a  separation 
process  for  gold  ore.  Also  selected  is  a  2-page  advertisement  explaining  Edison's  "dry  placer 
process  for  the  separation  of  gold  from  gravel  without  the  use  of  water,"  a  process  experimentally 
developed  at  the  West  Orange  laboratory  and  tested  at  the  Ortiz  Mine  in  Dolores,  New  Mexico. 

1899.  Motion  Pictures  (D-99-15) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  the  production  and 
commercial  development  of  motion  picture  films.  Most  of  the  items  concern  the  Klondike  Exposition 
Co.,  which  was  organized  by  Edison  and  Thomas  Crahan  to  make  a  filming  expedition  to  the  Yukon 
in  order  to  produce  films  suitable  for  display  at  the  Paris  Exposition  of  1900.  Included  is 


correspondence  between  Crahan  and  William  E.  Gilmore,  general  manager  of  the  Edison 
Manufacturing  Co.  Related  material  can  be  found  in  D-99-17  (Phonograph  -  General). 

1899.  Patents  (D-99-1 6) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  foreign  and  domestic 
patent  applications,  patent  litigation,  and  other  patent  matters.  Most  of  the  material  consists  of  letters 
to  Edison  from  the  law  firm  of  Dyer,  Edmonds  &  Dyer  pertaining  to  phonograph  patents  and  patent 
infringements. 


1899.  Phonograph  -  General  (D-99-17) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  the  commercial  and 
technical  development  of  phonographs,  particularly  the  business  of  the  National  Phonograph  Co. 
Most  of  the  items  are  letters  to  William  E.  Gilmore,  president  of  the  National  Phonograph  Co.,  from 
Charles  E.  Stevens,  foreign  agent  for  that  company.  Gilmore  and  Stevens  were  organizing 
phonograph  sales  abroad  even  though  the  Edison  United  Phonograph  Co.  had  already  been 
established  to  exploit  the  phonograph  outside  the  United  States.  Also  included  are  several  items 
pertaining  to  the  domestic  phonograph  market  as  well  as  an  undated  memorandum  by  Edison 
discussing  financial  arrangements  to  be  made  with  Stevens.  Several  of  Stevens's  letters  relate  to 
motion  picture  as  well  as  phonograph  markets.  The  records  of  the  National  Phonograph  Co.  for  the 
period  1 900-191 1  were  removed  from  the  Document  File  and  organized  by  ENHS  staff  as  a  separate 
record  group.  A  finding  aid  is  available.  Selected  items  from  this  record  group  can  be  found  in  the 
Company  Records  Series. 

1899.  Phonograph  -  Edison  Phonograph  Works  (D-99-1 8) 

[not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  the  Edison  Phonograph 
Works.  Most  of  the  material  for  1899  consists  of  orders  placed  with  the  Works  by  the  Edison  United 
Phonograph  Co.,  along  with  checks  and  routine  correspondence  associated  with  such  orders. 

1899.  Phonograph  -  Edison  United  Phonograph  Company  (D-99-1 9) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  relating  to  the  business  of  the  Edison  United 
Phonograph  Co.  and  its  subsidiaries.  Included  are  items  concerning  the  company's  financial 
problems,  wrangling  among  its  board  members,  and  relations  between  it,  the  subsidiary  Edison-Bell 
Consolidated  Phonograph  Co.,  Ltd.,  and  the  Edison  Phonograph  Works.  Many  of  the  letters  are  by 
George  N.  Morison,  secretary  of  the  company,  and  are  addressed  to  Stephen  F.  Moriarty,  vice 
president.  There  is  also  correspondence  by  Moriarty  and  by  John  E.  Searles,  president  of  the  Edison 
United  Phonograph  Co.  At  the  end  of  the  folder  are  two  undated  communications  by  Edison  to 
Josiah  C.  Reiff  denouncing  Moriarty  as  "an  extremely  dangerous  adventurer"  who  "has  been  living 
on  the  Co  for  years." 


1899.  West  Orange  Laboratory  (D-99-20) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  the  operation  of  the 
West  Orange  laboratory.  Among  the  correspondents  are  Edison,  Walter  S.  Mallory,  and  John  F. 
Randolph.  Included  are  letters  from  insurance  carriers,  items  pertaining  to  real  estate,  and  several 
Edison  memoranda  regarding  materials  ordered  for  the  laboratory. 


1899.  Edison,  T.A.  -  General  (D-99-01) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  relating  to  a  variety  of  subjects. 
Included  are  documents  that  deal  with  more  than  one  subject  or  that  do  not 
fall  under  the  main  subject  categories  in  the  Document  File.  Among  the  items 
for  1899  are  letters  from  longtime  Edison  associates,  Edward  H.  Johnson 
and  Sigmund  Bergmann. 

All  of  the  documents  have  been  selected. 


THE 

YOUNG  HEN’S  CHRISTIAN  ASSOCIATION 
OF  THE  ORANGES. 

419  .Main  St. 


,  .Office  o!  the  General  Secretary. 


Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison, 

Llewellyn  Park,  Orange,  N.  J. 


January..  12,..  189.9...1 


Doar  Sir: 


Mr.  Richard  Colgate  sugges'ts  that  I  remind  you  that  you  made  to  him,  some  weeks 
ago,  your  pledge  of  $100  toward  the  current  expenses  of  the  Young  Men’s  Christian  Associa¬ 
tion  of  the  Oranges,  be'ihg"the' same  amount  you  heivo  contributed;  annually,  for  several 
years  past.  As  our ^Association  fiscal  year  onds  January  31st,  we  are  specially  desirous 
of  securing  payment  of  ^1:  piW^gpspon  .account  of  the  work  of  1.898  before  the  close  of  the 
present  month,  and  would  bo  under  great  obligations  if  we  could  have  your  remittance  at  as 
early  a  date  as  may  be  convenient. 

Thanking  you  in,, anticipation;  I  remain, 


[ENCLOSURE] 


If  entirely  agreeable  to  you, 

|  it  would  be  a  very  great  accommodatio:^ 
and  much  appreciated,  if  you  could  send 
your  check  for  the  $100.  which  you  re¬ 
cently  contributed  toward'  the  running 
expenses  of  the  Orange  Young  Men's 
Christian  Association  early  this  month. 

i: 

We  have  a  number  of  bills  to  meet  by 
j ;  the  15th,  and  if  your  check  could  ar- 
•  rive  on  or  before  that  date,  I  will  ap- 
j  predate  it.  I  wish  to  thank  you  fofc 
j  the  interest  which  you  have  always  tak- 
!  en  in  this  work  in  Orange,  and  I  hope 
:  that  some  day  I  may  have  the  pleasure 
of  showing  you-  through  the  building, 


[ENCLOSURE] 


and  explaining  more  fully  just  the 
line  of  work  which  we  are  carrying  out. 

1  am  also  much  interested  in  the 
problems  which  you  have  to  meet  to  se¬ 
cure  good  workmen  for  your  iron  plant, 
and  if  at  any  time  I  can  be  of  any 
assistance  along  this  line  I  will  be 
pleased  if  you  will  call  upon  me. 

Yours  very  truly, 

Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison. 

New  York,  Dec.  3,  1898. 


^  r — ' — ' 

£$.  S$iee£ 


.R.  BRECKON  &  09, 


JANUARY  28th. ,  ^//?  99] 

T.  A.  Edison  Esq, 

New  York.  U.S.A.- 

Dear  Sir, 

Your  Electric  nun. 

This  is  not  much  in  use-  scarcely 
at  all  in  this  country.  The  patent  has 
I  suppose  expired.  it  was  an  excellent 
instrument  for  duplicating  documents- 
nothing  better  -has-been  produced  up  to  j 
this  time.  The  great  difficulty  was  , 
in  the  battery.  In  Offices  few  persons  ; 
would  keep  that  in  good  order’.'  .Then  the] 
use  of  the  pen  would  fail  and  hostility 
to  it  was  raised. 

I  have  been  thinking  that  you  may  be 


able  to  invent  a  simple  method  for 
taking  electricity. from  street  wires- 

reducing  the  force  of  it  so  as  to 
suit  the  working  of  the  pen.  This  idea 
may.  have  had  your  consideration-  if  so 
I  shall  be  obliged  if  you  will  write 
to  me  to  say  what  may  be  expected  in 
that  line. 

You  will  no  doubt  recollect  my  name 
when  I  mention  that  I  bought  your  Patent 
for  the  Electric  pen.- 


Yours  faithfully. 


[ON  BACK  OF  PRECEDING  PAGE] 


1L _  b,  v»-b- 

^  fe  ^ 

U<-^_ P^-7e~—X  ^ 

i)  ■  s, 

Cp't^  ^  CJLj^.r 

O-'-'  ttd-'*  y  — — - -Vey 


)F  TRADE  OF  THE  CITY  OF  NEWARK, 
NEW  JERSEY. 

ROOMS:  764  BROAD  ST. 


Newark,  N.  peb.  80  th,  1899. 

Hr.  Ehojnaa  A.  Edison,  • 

West  Orange,  N.  J. 

My  dear  Hr.  Edison: — 

I  have  been  appointed  by  the  Newark  Board 'of  Trade  as 
chairman  of  a  committee  on  the  "Reclamation  of  the  Newark  Mead¬ 
ows,.  " 

.  '  I  enclosed  band  you  points  raised  by  -the  State  Engi- 
c*  Verm  eta  e.  Tbe  question  involved,  row  is  to  do  away 

with  tbe  malarial  influences,  from  Which  we  are  suffering  and:  tbe 
mosquito  pest,  and  open  tbe  Newark  Meadows  at  first  to  a ra-i cul¬ 
ture  and  gradually  to  commerce.  6 

.  ..  be  a  Sr0at  help  to -me  if  some  6f  onr  leading- 

tbei^ our -Board1  of  Trade,  even  if  they  6m  y  allowed 
tbeir  names  to  be  used,  recommending  suob  improvement. 

mile  I  know  that,  your -time  will'  not  permit-  you  to  be 

c.i  amation  of  tbe  meadows,  and  1  feel  sure  that  I  can  make  a  suc¬ 
cess  of  this  movement.  ‘  raaKe  a  suo 

w_  ‘  I.kn0^  t:bat  Wv.  are  deeply  interested  in  tbe  welfare  of 
Newark,  having  been  connected  with  it  for  years. 

+  >10  ^  C0n?itt9e  °^yMob  I  am  tbe  chairman  consists  of 

the  following  members:  Austin  McGregor, ’Henry  Merz  of  Heller-85 
Mers,  George  W.  Tichenor, ,A.  •  C.  Courterj  Colonels  E. - L.  Price, & 

C.  C.  Vermeule,  James  A.  Coe,  R.  C.  Jenkinson  .and  Senator  Ketch-  " 

.our  SST  iwn;  STS^d^t^rSn90'  Tt  if  ~ 

Sb^  t0  att9nd  the  raeetinS3'  bUt  that  *»»  —an  advisory63801^ 

111  oraor"fco  .our  name  connected  with  this  good -  - 

Thereat  ^  ^  bec0me  a  member- of  our  Board  ojf Trade 

pfease  olr  £°  P"  *  7011  ^raWy  ^  Ss* 

.  enclosed' card,  sign  same  and  then  return 


OF  TRAD?  OF  THE  CITY  OF  NEWARK, 
NEW  JERSEY. 

ROOMS:  764  BROAD  ST. 


it  to  me,  in  end  o  add  envelope*  •  . 

Thanking  you  beforehand,  I  remain,  -with  my  kindest  re¬ 


gards. 


Tours  sincerely. 


Chairman  of  Committee  on  Reclamation 
of  Meadows*. 

P.  S.-Please  return  Mr.  Vermeule's  address  to  me,  as 
this  is  the  only  copy  X  have  1  eft. 

Dictated. 


EHCLO  SDRS.  (  ADDRESS.  ) 


<Vm 


POPE  MANUFACTURING  COMPANY 

MOTOR  CARRIAGE  DEPARTMENT  j  , 

HARTFORD,  CONN.,  U.  S.  A.  7^' - - 

?ln 


Hr.  Thomas  A.  Edison 

East  Orange,  H.  J 

Dour  si; 


X.  Jr 


ETTER  NO.  431-HKI 
Fab. Slot  ,1809. 


u-o- 

/is  a  result  of  the  interview  betwoen  you  and  our  an d  Hr.  /Udon 

in  the  course  of  which  you  expressed  a  dosire 
which  to  experiment  with  your  battery,  wo  addressed  our, 
museums  and  factories  parts  enough  front  which 


irt  of  a  tricydo  with 
s  to  collecting  IT  on  our 
with  what  you  want.  By 
the  manufacture  of  a  few  new  parts  we  have  succeeded  in  accomplishing  this  and  take 
pleasure  in  sending  you  by  freight  prepaid  to  Efot  Orange  the  result,  which  please 
consider  at  your  disposal  for  your  experiments  front  which  we  shall  be  glad  to  hear 
when  you  ore  ready. 

Very  t-^speetfuy^r; 


Pope 


&  Co.,  MOTOR  CARRIAGE  DEPT-, 


"XL  *0 


i 


7 


Harold  p.  brown, 
electrical  engineer, 

120  AND  122  LIBERTY  STREET,  HEW  YORK. 


the  Edison-brown  Plastic  Rail  Bond, 

UNDER  PATENTS  OF  THOS.A.EDISOH  AND  HAROLD  P.  BROWN. 


,-ACTORY.  MONTCLAIR. N.J. 
cableaddress.'lorah.newyork:  ai  code  used. 

March  25th.,  1899. 

Mi.  Thoams  A.  Edison, 

Orange,  IT.  J. 

My  Dear  Mr.  Edison: - 

I  have  your  letter  of  the  18th.  inclosing  letter  and  di¬ 
agram  from  Mr.  V! .  H.  Talley  of  Waco,  Texas  for  which  accept  my 
thanks.  I  have  written  Mr.  Talley  fully  in  regard  to  the  matter. 
Very  truly 


yours. 


HPB/fcj 


^  POSTAL  TELEGRAPH-CABLE  COMPANY.'"  " 

Office  of  the  Electrical  Engineer. 

M.  oavis,  *'..T.  New  York,  March  25th,  1899. 


My  dear  Mr.  Edison: - 

I  have  just  seen  a  letter  from  the  Italian  Govern¬ 
ment  Officials  of  tho  Telegraph  in  Italy  in  v/hich  they  express  a  very 
great  desire  to  receive  an  autograph  letter  from  you  expressing  your 
views  upon' the  scientific  and  electrical  achievements  of  one  of  Italy's 
honored  sons,  Volta,  to  whose  memory  there  is  to  he  a  one-hundredth 
anniversary  of  the  invention  of  Volta's  pile,  in  May  next  in  Como. 

I  also  inclose  herewith  a  subscription  blank  for  such  an  amount  as 
you  feel  like  contributing  towards  the  wreath  that  is  to  be  placed  on 
the  base  of  Volta's  statue  during  the  centennial  celebration. 


Y/ith  my  very  best  regards, 


[ENCLOSURE] 


VOLTA  FUND  COMMITTEE. 


TO  THE  FRATERNITY  ; 

Owing  ! o  the  national  importance  of  the  Volta  Centennial  celebration  at  Como,  Italy  and  of  the 
large  fund  that  is  being  raised  in  the  United  States  I  have  addressed  to  three  well  known  gentlemen 
the  following  letter  which  I  trust  will  meet  your  approval.  These  gentlemen  have  kindly  consented  to 
act  as  a  committee  on  your  behalf. 


Very  respectfully, 

J.  B.  TALTAVALL. 


Mr.  Wm.  H.  Baker,  New  York,  March  13th,  1899. 

Mr.  Wm.  J.  Dealy, 

Mr.  John  Brant  : 


Dear  Sirs-A  short  time  ago  I  was  requested  by  a  few  leading  telegraphers  in  New  York  to 
lend  the  services  of  myself  and  the  “  Telegraph  Age”  to  aid  in  securinga  delegate  and  in  raising  funds 
to  meet  h,s  expenses  to  the  Exposition  at  Como,  Italy,  to  be  held  next  May,  at  which  time  and  place 
the  one  liundreth  anniversary  of  Volta’s  great  invention  of  the  Chemical  Battery  is  to  be  celebrated. 

The  time  being  too  limited  to  consult  the  prominent  members  of  the  fraternity  throughout  the 
United  States,  I  secured  the  consent  of  Mr.  Walter  O.  Burton  tb  act  as  the  delegate,  and  Mr.  F.  W 
Jones-consented  to  act  as  treasurer  of  the  fund. 

The  appeal  made  for  subscriptions  through  the  '•  Telegraph  Age  ”  is  meeting  with  a  very 
liberal  response,  so  that  there  is  a  cheerful  prospect  of  not  only  securing  an  amount  sufficient  for  Mr 
Burton’s  expenses,  but  also  a  very  creditable  amount  in  addition  to  be  donated  to  the  Italian  authorities 
Tor  defraying  the  expense  of  the  magniilcient  bronze  wrcatli  that  is  to  bo  attached  to  Volta’s  statue  in 
tlio  name  of  the  telegraphers  throughout  the  world. 

m  h  „  ,rUMs  Tn'IT"  With  Mr-  J°neS  we  are  b0th  very  dcsirous  to  have  you  act  as  a  committee 
m  behalf  cf  the  United  States  subscriber  to  the  fund,  for  the  purpose  of  passing  upon  all  questions  in 
reference  thereto,  and  in  framing,  and  deciding  upon,  all  such  arrangements  for  the  guidance  of  the 
delegate  as  the  committee  shall  deem  wise,  and  also  to  authorize  all  proper  drafts  upon  the  treasurer, 
Mr.  Jones  and  myself  will  be  pleased  lender  the  committee  every  possible  assistance.  ”  i 
An  early  answer  will, oblige. 

Yours  very  truly, 

J.  B.  TALTAVALL. 


[ENCLOSURE] 

[ON  BACK  OF  PRECEDING  PAGE] 


¥ 

Amount  Forward  '  2G1.50 

The  Ohonite  Co. Ltd. ,  H.Y.  5.00 

E.  F.  Phillips ,  Am. Floe.  Works, 

Providenoo,  K.i.  10.00 

Clarence  w.  Seamans,  H.Y.  10.00 

T.  P.  Wheeler,  St.  Louis,  Mo.  1.00 

Oeo.  F.  Fagan,  H.Y.  1.00 

v/m.  Marshall,  »  2.00 

J.  F.  Shorey,  "  2.00 

Western  Elec.  Co.,  H.Y.  50.00 

W.  0.  Logue,  Orange,  H.J.  2.00 

F.  0.  Halstead,  H.Y.  .50 

W.  A.  Harris,  How  Haven,  Conn.  2.00 


Total 


347.00 


[ENCLOSURE] 


THE 

TELEG  RAPH  AO£, 

253  BROADWAY#  £ 0  1 1  ^  I 

.  TALTAVALL,  Publisher.  1  ^  ^ ',/rVO  N^w 

wary  10,  .  j 


Extract  from  Telegraph  Age  of  January 


“  American  Telegraphers  to  Honor  Volta.” 

Walter  o.  burton  named  as  the  delegate. 

foot  of  MUly.  nl'°  l;ai8inf  f!lm1s  t0  P«vcliasa  a  bronze  crown  to  be  placed  at  the 

l  t''6 f0t  Volta  the  inventor  of  what  is  known  as  the  voltaic  pile.  The  monument  of 
L  omo  til1 18  °C  <f  in,  ‘J10  °lty  °f  Oomo’  Itn’y-  "’here  the  honored  physicist  was  born.  It 
is  proposed  to  lmve  a  grand  celobration  m  May,  1800,  at  Milan  and  Como,  Italy,  in  honor  of  the 
one  hundredth  anniversary  of  Volta’s  great  discovery.  The  bronze  ciwn  is  to  be  paid  for  y 
popular  subscriptions  of  telegraphers  of  the  world.  Mr.  G.  Spreafico,  the  president  of  The  corA 
fund0\nd3esi.atlOn’lJ]  l  nnf’  rt!lIy’  be  eM  to  have  American  operators  contribute  to  the 

fund,  and  he  desnes  a  delegate  from  the  United  States  to  be  present  and  participate  in  an  inter- 

statue  of  vXMwlT  f;JGCt  t°f  W],Idl  T’iU  be  tlle  <leP®Hing  of  the  bronze  crown  at  the  foot  of  the 
statue  on  olta,  which  lus  native  town  has  erected  to  the  celebrated  inventor.  The  movemeut  is 

BiSSn eS”1,h  AdmiUiStl'ati0U  118  WeU  03  hy  th°  teleeml>b  departments  of  other 

with  trnmfnnnT™?111  ‘h™0  .m0Ilths’  tl“e  in  which  fc°  make  all  preparations,  and  after  consultation 
no iminate  the  de' P?TT T V0  tole^afel's>  }*  was  concluded  that  the  editor  of  Telegraph  Age 
wTth^  iv  take V  tho?°lnoI"te““t>onal  Telegraph  Congress,  and  in  compliance  there- 
o^the  Western  Tnt  1  nT  W‘alte1'  °'  chief  operator  of  the  race  bureau, 

of  the  Western  Union  Telegraph  Company,  at  195  Broadway,  New  York.  Mr.  Burton  is  a 
thoroughly  representative  and  expert  American  telegrapher,  and  without  a  doubt  one  of  the  best 
if  not  tliG  leading  oi’atoi%  in  tlio  nrofp^sinn  lt,,  ,  > 

tingly  represent  the  American  telegraph  profession.  ^  emen  quallfied  to  fifc' 

somo^on'o^i^oarO^nTT^TT  to  1)0  raisetl  by  popular  subscription,  and  we  sincerely  hope 

some  one  in  each  of  the  telegraph  offices  throughout  the  country  will  at  once  assume  the  responsi¬ 
bility  of  raising  the  necessary  funds.  Five  hundred  dollars  will  be  required  to  defray  Mr  Bur¬ 
ton  s  expenses,  and  to  make  a  liberal  donation  to  the  fund  to  -purchase  the  hr  c  o  ill 

contributions  will  be  acknowledged  through  these  columns.  It  is  desired  to  ha  e  many  con 

tributes  ns .possible  in  order  that  the  fund  may  be  a  representative  one  7 

York  has  JdndlvL'  the folef'ical  enSinee1'  of  the  Postal  Telegraph-Cable  Company,  New 

S  i r  7  f  ;r  e  T  act  ”3  treasurer  of  tbe  to  defray  the  expenses  of  the  Amm-ican 
delegate.  Remittances  may  be  made  to  Mr.  F.  W.  Jones,  253  Broadway,  New  York  ” 


To  F.  W.  JONES,  Esq., 

253  Broadway.  Ne\ 
I  herewith  hand  you  $ _ 


ts  my  contribution  to  the  fund  to  defray 


the  expenses  of  a  delegate  to  the  Oomo,  Italy,  International  Telegraph  Congress. 
Yours  very  truly,  ■ 


PILLING  &  CRANE, 


March  27th.  1899. 

Thomas  A.  Edison.,  Esq.,  (Lab orator/)  j  \ 

Orange,  N.  J.  ' jrf 

Dear  sir:  *  (jj*' 

The  Standard  Connell sv ills  Coke  Company  has  sent  yon  a 
box  of  ooal  which  is  marked  .0099.  This  is  coal  from  a  section  of 
country  surrounding  the  Connellsville  district,  and  which  is 
comparatively  worthless  on  account  of  its  high  sulphur,  which 
renders  the  coke  objectionable.  It  is  said  that  if  any  means 
can  be  devised  of  separating  the  sulphur  from  this  coal,  it  would 
make  the  lands  worth  5300.,  to  $1000.,  per  acre,  and  it  is  now  ' 
selling  anywhere  from  $10.00  to  $50,00  per  acre.  ITe  could 
realize  for  you  an  enormous  profit,  if  the  coal  can  be  made 
comparatively  pure. 


Yours  very  truly, 


sS 


fat-  #-r^  .^r-ts— 

'ht*  3  '  <j?  ?Z<C££crix> 


[ENCLOSURE] 


My  dear  Mr.  Edison:- 

I  send  by  express,  prepaid,  a  couple  of  boxes  of  soap. 
One  is  made  from  tallow  and  the  other  from  cotton  seed  oil.  You  will 
notice  that  that  made  from  cotton  seed  oil  is  very  soft  as  compared  with 
the  other.  By  addins  silicate  or  soda  the  cotton  seed  oil  is  very  much 
hardened,  but  even  then  it  does  not  become  hard  enough  for  our  use.  If., 
in  your  experiments,  you  should  stumble  across  anything  which  would  harden 
this  soap  more  than  either  of  the  above  ingredients  do,  it  would  be  of 
value  to  us.  With  tallow,  more  rosin  can  be  used  in  soap  than  with  cotton 
seed  oil,  on  account  of  the  stronger  body  of  tallow.  It  would  not  be  of 
advantage  to  add  anything  to  the  cotton  seed  oil  which  in  itself  would 
detract  in  any  marked  degree  from  the  lathering  properties  of  the  soap. 

If  there  are  any  further  particulars  which  you  might  desire  to  know  in  re¬ 
gard  to  this,  I  will  be  happy  to  give  whatever  information  you  may  desire. 

Another  problem  which  we  have  not  yet  been  able  to  solve,  is  the 
bleaching  of  cotton  seed  oil  foots,  or  what  is  known  commonly  as  cotton 
seed  soap  stock.  It  contains  from  50  to  75/if  of  fatty  acid,  turns  black 
when  exposed  to  the  air,  and  when  made  into  soap,  it  is  dark  brown  in 
color.  What  we  want  to  do  is  in  some  way  to  bleach  this  up  to  a  bright 
yellow,  Fuller's  earth  does  this  to  a  certain  extent,  but  does  not  carry 
the  process  far  enough.  I  can  send  you  samples  of  this,  should  you  de¬ 
sire  them.  In  clarifying  cotton  see^c  oil,  which  is  treated  with  caustic 
lye,  these  fats  settle  to  the  bottom  in  the  form  of  a  semi-saponified 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Stock,  and  therefore  contain  all  the  colorins  matter-  and  sediment  found 
in  cotton  seed  oil.  There  are  many  problems  in  soap  making  which  have  as 
yet  remined  unsolved,  but  to  these  two,  just  at  present,  we  are  givinS 
the  greatest  attention. 


X  hope  that  in  carrying  on  your  other-  experiments  ; 
possibly  be  able  to  throw  an  "X  Ray'”  on  these  two  problems. 


Yours  very  truly, 

'OticL  yuMf 


Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison. 


ANS.  SEP  >309 


vc/sco,...  August . 13.il},, . 1899.,.. 

,UkB*C-  £XMt. 


Thomas  E.  Edison  Esq 


Dear  Sir:-, 

We  observe  that  you  are  Interesting  ..yourself  in  the 
manufacture  of  artificial  fuel,  and  we  take  the  liberty  of  saying  that 
a  Client  of  ours,  recently  deceased,  was  the  patentee  of  a  process  whioh 
may  possibly  be  useful  to  you,  or  interest  you' 

The  patentee  was  himself  a  man;of  much  inventive  genius;  but  was 
lacking  in  business  qualities  and  failejfr’to  turn  his  inventions  to  good 
pecuniary  account.  \  / 

His  widow  and  legal  representative,  is  desirous  of  realizing  on  his 
patents  and  has  requested  ns  to  submit  this  to  you. 

We  inclose  a  copy  of^eoifiwtionsr3KTare  informed  that  the  geyser- 
ite^, which  is  the  preferred  binderyCan  be  had  in  unlimited  quantities. 

We  should  be  glad  to  repeiyve  any  offer  or  suggestion  from  you. 

) 


Respectfully  yours. 


Qt/tmw/ Srf.  > 

vieytwf/  . 

'/S//  ■t3$r fifty/? vr/y*-. 


New  York, October  21st,  1899. 


THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  Esq: 

Orange,  New  Jersey. 
Near  sir. 


A  suggestion  that  the  Americans  who  have  enjoyed  the  splendid 
hospitality  of  Sir  Thomas  J.Lipton  on  the  ERIN  during  the  International 
Yacht  Races  should  present  to  him  a  Loving  Cup,  in  remembrance, has  met 
w'ith  prompt  and  cordial  approval.  It  is  believed  that  all  of  us  whose 
names  and  addresses  can  be  ascertained  will  be  glad  to  participate. 

Any  action  must  of  necessity  be  informal  and  quickly  taken.  The  un¬ 
dersigned  have  consented  to  serve  as  your  committee They  have  sub¬ 
scribed  ten  dollars  each  and  are  ready  to  increase  this  whatever  is  nec¬ 
essary.  If  you  think  best  to  contribute, kindly  enclose  any  remittance 
you  see  fit  to  the  order  of  Edward  A. Sumner,  as  treasurer,  141  Broad¬ 
way,  New  York.  And  please  send  the  names  and  addresses  of  any  other 
Americans  you  know  were  fellow  guests  with  us.  A  partial  list  has 
been  secured,  but  it  is  wished  that  every  one  be  reached  and  be  sent  a 
notice  of  when  and  where  we  can  secure  Sir  Thomas  and  surprise  him  with 
the  Cup. 

Very  sincerely  yours, 

Hon.  Levi  P. Morton, 

Hon.  Richard  Croker, 

Hon .Ferdinand  W.Peck, 

Hon.  Frederick  Fehfib^d, 

Sontt  Watson, 

Edward  A. Sumner, 

Col.  W .6 .H .Washington, 
Charles  Farley  Winch. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


This  CUP  is  from  the  American  cuests  on  the 
ERIN.  It  has  no  connection  with  any  other 


presentation. 


My’  dear  Mr.  Edison:"' 

-ju,  For  a  number  of  years  past  . 

•••;  you  have  very  generously  contributed/^^ 
§100.  toward  the  expenses'^  the  Orange^1 


||f'  yotmg^Jien"1  s'1  Christian  Association,  and 
§ ask  if  you  cannot  kindly  renew1  your 
^'T.'suDscTi^ibn""for^{7IT“year'’and  place 
your  name  in  the  subscription  book 
which  x  enclose?  Our  Association  to¬ 
day  has  a  membership  of  about  nine 
hundred,  among  which  are  a  number  of 
your  employes,  and  was  never  doing  as 
good  a  work  as  at  present.  Our  educa¬ 
tional  classes  in  the  evening  number 
about  one  hundred  and  fifty.  I  had 


1 

hoped  to  be  able  to  see  you  In  person 
but  have  been  unable  to  find  you  in, al¬ 
though  calling  several  times,  so  I 
trust  that  you  will  excuse  my  writing 
you.  Will  you  kindly  return  to  me  the 
enclosed  subscription  book,  as  it  is 
the  only  one  which  I  have  and  is  of 
great  value  to  me.  We  have  just  re- 
— -  — caived  a  subscription  of  $100.  each 
from  Mr.  Colby  and  his  brother  of  the 
Park,  and  they  will  add  their  names  to 
I  those  already  in  this  book. 

Thanking  you  for  the  interest  and 
|  the  support  which  you  have  always  given 
to  this  enterprise,  believe  me, 
j  Yours  very  truly,  i 

I  Mr.  Thomas  Edison. 


New  York,  November  17,  1899. 


Please  accept  my  thanks  for  your  kind  donation  of 


§100.  toward  the  expenses  of  the  Young  Hen's  Christian  Association  of  the  •  ‘A 
Oranges.  It  is  only  by  receiving  such  contributions  that  we  are  enabled  A. A. 
to  place  the  many  advantages  which  we  before  the  young  men*  and  I  V' 
felt  that  in  asking  this  of  you,  it  was  for  an  object  which  is  really 
doing  as  much  good  for  the  morals  and  the  uplifting  of  the  Orange  young 
men  as  any  other  institution  or  society  among  us.  If  entirely  convenient,  \ 
it  would  be  an  accommodation  if  we  could  receive  your  check  before  the 
10th  of  next  month. 


I  saw  your  automobile  in  the  Park  yesterday,  and  I  an  going  to 
ask  the  privilege  of  taking  a  ride  in  it  some  day,  as  I  think  seriously 
of  securing  some  sort  of  a  locomotor  for  my  own  use,  and  would  like  the 
benefit  of  your  experience.  Knowing  your  excessive  fondness  for  horses, 
I  can  appreciate  how  much  you  must  enjoy  this  new  vehicle/ 

Again  thanking  you  for  your  kindness,  believe  me,  as  ever, 


f  £.  . W 

Ber^mann- Elektromotoren-  und  Dynamo  -  Werke 

Aktiengesellschaft. 

Giro-Conto :  Reichsbitnk. 

Telegramm-Adresse:  FnJgura  Berlin 

Femsprtch'AMchltiise: 

Amt  II,  No.  2652  mid  2600. 

A.B.C.  Code  Used. 

.1363 

T  h  o  s  *  A,  Edison,  Esq, 


BERLIN  N, . I)ec.am.b.er....l8,. . j8'q 

Oudcnarder  Strasse  23)30  ^ 


Llevellyn  Park 
Orange  N.J. 

My  dear  Edison, 

For  some  time  passed  It  was  my  intention  of  writing 
to  you,  and  now,  as  the  year  is  drawing  to  a  close,  I  come  to  realise 
this  good  intention,  as  I  am  anxious  to  know,  how  you  are  getting 
along, 

I  had  planned  to  come  over  to  the  States  last  Fall,  hut  busi¬ 
ness  developments  have  taken  such  a  turn,  that  it  was  to  my  interest 
to  postpone  the  intended  trip. 

The  motor  and  dynamo  business,  I  am  happy  to  say,  is  develo¬ 
ping  nicely  in  Germany,  and  there  is  a  good  prospect  for  prosperity 
in  that  line  for  some  years  to  come. 

I  am  building  at  present  a  large  construction  hall,  connected 
with  our  present  dynamo  and  motor  Works,  for  building  large  type  dy-  . 
n amos . 

The  catalogues  which  I  am  sanding  you  under  separate  cover, 


Bergmann  -Elektromotoren-  und  Dynamo  -Werke  Aktiengesellschaft. 


2  (  Thos.  A.  Edison,  Esq .  ) 

will  prove  to  you  that  I  have  not  been  idie,  and  X  may  say  It  myself, 
that  I  have  been  working  pretty  hard  during  my  stay  hare,  hut  I  am 
glad  to  state,  with  much  success . 

As  we  have  no  such  undertow  competition  here  as  you  and  I  have 
often  experienced ,  while  in  business  together,  things  here  lie  in  more 
pleasant  ways  and  all  around,  I  am  very  satisfied,  that  X  have  trans¬ 
ferred  the  greater  part  of  my  labour  to  this  side  of  the  Ocean. 

How,  my  dear  Edison,  how  are  you  getting  along ?  I  hope,  you 
have  soon  reached  the  point,  that  you  have  only  pleasant  things  to 
report . 

Please  write  me  a  few  lines  and  let  me  know  whether  there  is 
anything  I  may  be  able  to  do  for  you  in  a  business  way  or  otherwise, 
as  you  know,  it  gives  me  great  pleasure  to  be  at  your  service. 

Are  you  still  intending  to  come  out  to  Europe  for  a  visit 
next  summer  with  your  family,  as  you  suggested,  you  would  do  ?  Myself 
and  all  you-  friends  here  would  take  good  care  of  you  and  your  family. 

X  would  look  forward  to  your  and  your  family’s  visit  as  to  a  great  ho¬ 
liday. 

Last  summer  we  called  at  Dresden,  and  Mrs.  Bergmann  and  my 
daughters  have  visited  your  daughter,  Mrs.  Oeser ;  X  much  regretted :of 


/ . . . “ .  ■  . . 

Bergmann -Elektromotoren-  und  Dynamo-  Werke  Aktiengesellschaft. 


3  (  Thos.  A.  Edison,  Esq.  ) 


not  being  able  to  call  myself,  as  Mrs.  Oeser  was  confined  to  bad  by 
sickness  at  the  time. 

T  know  you  are  still  working  hard  on  your  big  scheme,  and  it 
would  interest  me  to  learn,  if  you  are  also  worktng  on  something  new, 
which  I  could  perhaps  handle  for  you  here  in  Germany,  having  good  fi¬ 
nancial  connections  and  would  well  be  able  to  introduce  anything  new 
and  good. 

■  Your  patent  applications  con  the  Ore  Milling  System  in  Germany 
are  making  slow  but  good  progress .  Perhaps  you  know  from  personal  ex¬ 
perience,  that  the  German  Patent  Office  is  like  the  "Mills  of  the 
Gods".  They  grind  slowly  but  exceedingly  fine. 

I  hope  to  receive  news  from  you  at  an  early  date  and  wishing 
you,  Mrs.  Edison  and  your  family  a  very  happy,  prosperous  New  Year, 

I  remain 


[ON  BACK  OF  PRECEDING  PAGE] 


\ 


k  §?  m&w'  ^s-j*  ■’j 


\\\i^  ij^.\\TO\W-  MvW'X‘V’ 


- nac.emhjar_22nd.,  • 


Mr.  Thomas  A.  Sell  son, 

Orange j  !T.  J. 
My  dear  Sir:- 


are  exceedingly  obliged  for  youf  favor  of  the  p.lst, 
current  and  the  subject  to  which  you  refer  Its  shall  have  our  very  best 
attention. 

Again  thojikiijg  yon  for  balling  our  attention  to  this  matter, 


1899.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Clubs  and  Societies  (D-99-02) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to 
Edison's  membership  and  activities  in  clubs  and  professional  societies. 

All  of  the  documents  have  been  selected. 


West  Orange,  N.  J* 

My  dear  Mr.  Edison:  — •  .  • 

I  am  in  receipt  of  your  esteemed  favor  of  yesterday,  return¬ 
ing  Mr*  Venneul  e*  s  addressi  also'  enclosing  70 nr  signature  for  memberw 
sMp  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  and'  oheok  in  payment  of  annual  sub¬ 
scription  fee— $10.00,  'which  I /have  handed  over  to  the  Treasurer* 

My  thanks  to  yon.  / 

•  I  -would  very  much  like  you  to  be  present  at  our -next  Board 
meeting!  which  will  be  held  about  the  middle  of  the  month,  and  I  want 
to  have  the  pleasure  of  escorting  you,  as  a  new  member. 

With  my  kindest  regards  to  you>  I  remain'. 

Tours  truly. 


Dlotatec 


Electrical  World  and  Electrical  Engineer 


9  MURRAY  STREET,  NEW  YORK. 


(s/1^  L  ] 


"0¥^r  ^t^r-  is£0>^i£  >*>  ^  _c^<- 

<3^  $  <&&&.  *P+fr*~  ^  /-/.  r/ 

Cl^Or^C^.  .  6 

l'  SUC.«tW0HtD4£^i«,BWEER 


OFFICE  OF  THE 


Emm  ^efern  ^n*on  Telegraph  Company, 

Manager, 


Mr.  Thos.  A.  Edison, 

Orange,  : 


Dear  Sir:— 

+>,«  t2  “7  letter  stating  that  we/  had  reserved 

the.plaoe  of  honor  for  you  at  the  meeting  of  the  Old  Time  Tnlrtt*- 

you  will  find  it  convenient  and  agreeable  to  attend, 
f.orgi 

WOUll 


Yours  truly 


/////  ■///•///.  r.r,  <fe>  '"ty  //fry  oft/  <• 

r>/y/t n^bft/t  /.  e/w  / .^r;  &/:'// /y 


&/#£}*  7'*/m 


nmd|api3|md  ‘wans  iguanas 's  Si  -oN 

ajnjijsui  ujHUBJd  sjaSBUBjj  Pub  sjaagjo 


i824  1899 

Seventy-Fifth  Anniversary 
Franklin  Institute 

of  the  State  of  Pennsylvania  for  the  Promotion  of 
the  Mechanic  Arts 


October  2d,  3d,  4th,  5th,  6th  and  7th,  at 

in  the  Convention  Hnll  of  the 

National  Export  Exposition 

Philadelphia 


8  o’clock 


the  Officers 

anal  Export 

ident  of  the 
‘The  Prog- 

*.  Henry 
;raphy  and 


Wednesday,  October  4th,  8  p.  m. 
Mining  and  Metallurgical  Section 


Mr.  James  Christie,  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  President  of  the 
Section.  "Introductory  Address." 

Mr.  Chas.  Kirchhoff,  New  York.  "  Three-quarters  of  a 
Century's  Progress  in  Mining  and  Metallurgy.” 

Mr.  John  Fritz,  Bethlehem,  Pa.  “The  Development  of 
Iron  Manufacture  during  the  past  Seventy-five  Years. 

Finale  : — Stereopticon  Illustrations 


Thursday,  October  5th,  8  p. 


„av  Export  Bx 

PHILADELPHIA,  PA.  lfOfj 


oA^dmitA 


m  October  iad' to  ^th,  1899. 
ACCOUNT  SEVENTY-FIFTH  ANNIVERSARY  OF 
THE  FOUNDING  OF  THE  FRANKLIN  INSTITUTE 


75th  Anniversary  Franklin  Institute 

lunch  Garb 

Saturday,  October  7th,  10  P.  M. 


[ON  BACK  OF  PRECEDING  PAGE] 


E.  .1871. 

Not  Transferable. 


This  Complimentary  Card  is  good  for  admis¬ 
sion  at  any  Pass  Gate. 

The'  holder  will  please  deposit  his  personal  card 
with  gatekeeper  as  a  'basis- of  statistics. 

This  Card  must  be  shown  for  each  admittance. 


VOID  UNLESS  SIGNED  BY 


1899.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Family  (D-99-04) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  concerning 
Edison's  family.  Included  are  items  regarding  the  business  activities  of 
William  Leslie  Edison  and  Thomas  A.  Edison,  Jr. 

All  of  the  documents  have  been  selected. 


[ATTACHMENT] 


PHILIP  POND,  2d, 


Hr.  Thomas  A.  Edison, 


jfcw  3%rr  vet/,  *~/oom 


I  have  a  claim  against  William  L.  Edison  in  favor  of  0.  B.  Rice 
for  twenty  hours  tutoring  in  Physios  amounting  to  §50.00 
The  daites  are  as  follows: 

1898-January  30,  l  hour.  Av  „  f 

/A  V 

February  1,  a  »  ,  S  \f\  W 

■  .  /V  f  V , 


rf  /  // 

fV./  /  Vi 


March  3,  3 

“  4,  3 


^  /f'AV/ 

Kindly  remit  the  same  to  my  order  at  onoe  aM  thu\  oloseupVhe 


DMtated. 


[ATTACHMENT] 


^  bUy^v  wti^l 

n  i  <j  o  \  ^vcx^>JC  ^  "GCJjy\JL<4  ca-v^c^ 

.'t^-  WxJU^o  fl— *£?  :  ^  | 

w/  1! 


[FROM  F.  D.  PALMER] 

TA£>  S&wiiltj  -  j77 

THOS.  A.  EDISON,  Jli.,  Pit  ns.  WM.  HOLZER,  Vice- Pit  kh.  P.  D.  PALMER,  Sue.  AND  Tubas. 


The  Thomas  a.  Edison  Jr.  and  Wm,  Holzer 
Steel  and  iron  Process  Company, 

room  401.  35  and  37  Nassau  Street, 

new  York, _ .Maroh...l4th, . 1899. 

THOMAS  A.  EDISON  ESQ., 

Orange,  N.  J. 

Dear  sirs  — 

Prefatorily,  let  me  state  this  letter  is  written  chiefly 
because  of  the  interest  I  feel  in  your  son,  Thomas  A.  Edison,  Jr.  As  the 
above  heading  will  show,  I  am  connected  with  him  in  his  new  process  for 
treating  steel  and  iron.  The  process  is  a  secret  one,  and  is  now  only 
known  to  your  son.  I  have  been  informed  and  understand  that  you  are  con¬ 
versant  with  the  process,  and  I  now  desire  to  ask  you  the  direct  quest¬ 
ion,  :  TBhat  is  your  personal  opinion  of  the  practicability  of  the  process 
as  to  whether  it  will  toughen  steel  aB  claimed  for  it  by  the  inventor  ? 

I  truBt  you  will  pardon  this  obtrusion  on  account  of  it  really  being  in 
the  interest  of  your  son,  and  that  you  will  kindly  favor  me  with  an  early 
reply. 

I  enclose  you  a  copy  of  the  test  made  by  the  Bethlehem  Iron  Co. 
on  pieces  of  steel  already  treated  by  your  son’s  process. 

Very  truly  yours, 

Enc/. 


/  "W.  L.  EDISON.  L,  KAISSR,  M’o’i? 

/^Pftonosrapbs,  Records  ©  Supplies, 

IT  AN  MOTORS  OF  AI/O  IONDS, 

45  EAST  59th  STREET. 

c/ifew-  - JUNE.  27th.. . 1899. . / 

My  dear  John: 

Do  me  the  favor  by  sending  my  check  immediatlyas  I 
leave  for  Chautauqua  N.Y.  on  Saturday  the  1st. 

Thanking  you  in  advance  I  remain 

Very1 truly  yours 

WLE>;  CX/vVfc  <rv^ 


t:  -WA*. 

P.S.  .  .  • 

The  enclosed  bill  is  oorroct.  •  / 


- G.  M,  ROGERS 

ADDRESS  ATjTj  COMMUNIdATIONS  TO 

EDISON-ROGERS  CO. 

45  East  59th  Street. 

-XliUJCSaa. _ 

Thomas  A.  Edison, 

Orange,  h.j. 

Dear  Father: 

Rogers  and  myaelf  will  toe  over  to  see  $fou  on 
the  21 at  of  this  month  in  regards  to  the  manufacturing  of  our  machines. 
Enclosed, find  a  catalogue  i  recently  got  up  and  trust  you  win  read  it 
in  your  leasure  hours. 

I  have  a  groat  many  things  to  talk  to  you  about ,oonseming  your  talk  on 
Friday  last  with  Rogers  and  can  sot  myself  right  ia  many  things. 

your  devoted  son. 


? ®v\v»SL<_. 
SON - La. 


131  Liberty  Street. 
Cable  AtWreit,  "EDIRO”  N.  Y. 


W-vJ^SL 


[ENCLOSURE] 


•■•THE-;/ 

EDIS0N=  ROGERS 
COMPANY. 
EXHIBITION  ROOMS 

45  East;59 tin !St. V/' 

V  -  FACTORY^  V  ' 

■  131-  Liberty  Street.  ~ 

W.  L.  EDISON. 'New  York:  r 
G.  M.;ROQERS.  New  York.  ,' 


[ENCLOSURE] 


THE 

EDISON=ROGEJRS 
COMPANY. 
EXHIBITION  ROOMS 

45  East  59tli  St. 

FACTORY, 

131  Liberty  Street. 


W.  L.  EDISON.  New  York. 
G.  M.  ROGERS.  New  York. 
C.  M.  ROSE,  n’e’r. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


M9/E  are  manufacturing  and  putting  on 
VV  the  market  an  automatic  picture 
machine  called  the  PiioToscopk  which  is 
the  only  absolutely  perfect  automatic  mov¬ 
ing  picture  machine  ever  manufactured. 

This  machine  surpasses  all  other  inven¬ 
tions  of  a  similar  nature  made  for  thenuiuse- 
ment  of  the  general  public. 

This  machine  is  provided  with  a  push 
button  and  by  pressing  same,  the  machine  is 
lighted  up  by  electricity  and  one  exquisite 
and  beautifully  illuminated  picture  is  shown 

nickel,  a  couccnlcd  music  box  plays  delight¬ 
ful  music  during  the  operation  of  the  nta- 

This  is  positively  the  only  picture  ma¬ 
chine  which  combines  music  and  pictures. 

SOME  FACTS  REGARDING  MACHINE, 
i.  Case  of  polished  Oak. 

а.  Mounted  on  an  Oak  and  Iron  stand. 

3.  Money  Drawer  lias  special  lock. 

4.  Lighted  by  street  current  or  battery. 

5.  Hasan  automatic  recorder  for  each  nickel 

б.  Automatic  springs,  etc. 

7.  Size— 22"  high -17"  by  17"  base. 


Now  let  us  see  what  ndvnntngc  you  re¬ 
ceive  by  purchasing  these  machines. 

Each  machine  iu  a  good  location  would 
take  in  from  $1.00  to  $3.00  a  day,  now  sup- 
pose  it  took  in  only  50  c.  a  day  that  will  be 
$15.00  a  month  or  $180.00  a  year.  A  slip 
showing  this  table  for  machines  from  .one  to 
one  hundred  machines  mailed  on  application 


his  place  with  "  warm  ’’  views  can  pay  his 

Remember  that  these  machines  work 
while  you  sleep  and  while  you  are  resting  011 
Sunday,  they  are  working  overtime  and  pil¬ 
ing  up  double  receipts. 

These  machines  enn  be  made  to  operate 
both  by  nickel  and  penny  coins,  and  packed 
and  delivered  to  you  F.O.B.,  New  York  City 
railway  station.  ....  $S5.oo 

The  beautiful  colored  and  opalescent 
views  are  made  in  France,  and  can. only  lie 
ordered  through  us.  They  appear  absolutely 
lifelike  and  perfectly  stereoscopic  in  defuii- 


[ENCLOSURE] 


I  he  machines  tee  have  put  out  lmvc 
earned  for  their  fortunate  owners  from  five 
to  fifty  dollars  per  week  clear  profit  for  each 
machine ,  often  paying  for  themselves  com¬ 
pletely  within  a  week  or  ten  days  of  pur¬ 
chase,  During  the  course  of  a  year  the 

themselves  four  or  five  times  over. 


Naturally  the  individuals  owning  and 
running  these  machines  are  not  telling  much 
of  this  to  the  public,  for  fear  of  competition 
in  their  own  fields,  as  the  business  is  so  eas¬ 
ily  handled  by  auy  one  of  ordinary  intelli¬ 
gence  and  small  capital,  say  $200  to  $2,000. 
Our  machines  arc  patented. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


£■  fcn^  -  fe~A 
CASE  AND  LUDLOW, 


QL^i^jTTAV<rv^ej  ej-*yi  yf  l-w 

uj.  w^etu  1 

’  Ov  ^  {‘-C 

X- 


newyork,  Dec.  6,  1899. 

Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esc)., 

Edison  Labratory, 

Orange,  N.  J. 

Dear  Sir:- 

I  find  upon  negotiating  sale  to  Mr.  .Henry  Hallenbeok  of 

Montclair  of  a  certain  mortgage  given  by  you/in  1895  to  your  son 

William  L.  Edison  for  $4500.00  upon  certaiiy  property  located  in 

the  Townships  of  Bloomfield  and  Bellevill§/,  same  being  due  April 

1st,  1899,  that  there  was  no  bond  given  J&id  the  purchaser  stands 

upon  this  fact  in  declaring  the  purchases  off.  In  a  conference 

with  Mr.  Otiis  of  Ot.iis  &  Pressenger,  £ll  Broadway,  who  made  out 

this  mortgage  together  with  a  similar^  one  to  Thomas  A.  Edison, Jr., 

he  states  that  he  did  .not^  consider-  the  bond  essential,  i 

the  property  is  ample  security  for  yfeum  stated  in  the  mortgage. 

However,  in  as  much  as  the  purchaser  takes  the  position  that  he 

does,  I  have  taken  the  liberty  off  laying  the  matter  before  you  and 

request  that  you  give  us  a  collateral  bond  now,  so  that  the  pur- 

cljaser  cannot  be  released  froW'his  written  acceptance.  Of  course 

■it  is  a  mere  matter  of  fornyas  far  as  you  are  concerned,  though  of 

inesteemable  valud^toumy^cTrient . 

If this  is  .agreeable  to  you,  I  will  prepare  bond  and 

submit  the  same  together  with  the  mortgage  for  your  consideration 
and  acknowledgement. 


Vervtruly 


1899.  Edison  Manufacturing  Company  (D-99-09) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  the 
business  of  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Co.  Included  are  items  pertaining  to  the 
use  of  Edison's  signature  as  a  registered  trademark  and  to  the  use  of 
phonoplex  circuits  by  Western  Union.  Also  included  is  a  statement  of  the 
company's  assets  as  of  March  1,  1899,  submitted  by  William  E.  Gilmore, 
general  manager. 

More  than  90  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  The  items 
not  selected  consist  of  requests  for  information  regarding  phonoplex  circuits 
and  documents  that  duplicate  information  in  selected  material. 

Other  items  in  the  Document  File  relating  to  the  Edison  Manufacturing 
Co.  can  be  found  in  D-99-15  (Motion  Pictures). 


191] 


PLEASE  BRING  T 


TIOX  Ol>  ASSESSMENT: 
iturduy,  then.  JO  A.  M.  to  12  ft 

3  NOTICE  WITH  YOU. 


™  l)«nel)t  only  of  tho  parly  aaa 


. 

. ^2?.  . 

. . wfc  •  /V*3  ?  /brryztj 


Newark,  II.  J. 


Dear  Sirs: 


I  bog  to  submit  herewith  statement  of  this  Company  as  of 
March  1st,  and  desire  to  say  In  connection  therewith  that  this  is  not 
an  incorporated  Company,  being  owned  absolutely  by  Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison. 


Merchandise-,  finished  and  unfinished, 
Cash  and  Accounts  Receivable, 

Buildings  and  Machinery,  Tools,  Furni¬ 
ture  and  Fixtures,  etc., 

Total,  . 


Liabilities, 


Merchandise,  current  accounts, 
Net, 


§  37,040.84 
39,061.42 

30,070,33 

112,979.99 

20,240.13 
$  04,739.86. 


Yours  very  truly. 


ma/iw 


General  Manager, 


{WESTERN, -UNION  (TELEGRAPH  COL 
Western  .^DiyisioN., 


"  Chicago,-  August  18  • 


..Tho8;-  A:  Editor.,-  f5s.q . ,  • 


I  return  herewith  your  b  i  l  l  of  July  1  &'"*  1899’;- ■’'amount 


$112.50,  royalty  on  phonopli 


rcuits,  Cincinnati  to  Columbus, 


Cincinnati  to  Lexington  and.  Cincinnati  to  Springfield,  January  1, 
1899,  to  July  1,  1899.  1  also  attach  thereto  correspondence 

passing  between  Superintendent  Miller,  Cincinnati,  and  this  office. 
In  this  connection  1  beg  to  call  your  attention  to  my  letter  to 
you  June  27th.  reporting  discontinuance  of  phonoplex  circuit  be-, 
tween  Cincinnati  and  Columbus  at  the  close  of  the  year  1898.  As 
soon  as  our  wire  facilities  between  Cincinnati  and  Columbus  ax'd, 
between  Cincinnati  and  Springfield  again  become  inadequate,  we 
will  resume  operation  of  the  phonoplex  between  those  points  and 
you  will  be  promptly  notified. 

Under  the  circumstances,  wil 1  you  kindly  eliminate  from 
the  attached  bi/13,  the  li  rst  and  third  items  and  return  corrected 


h  i  l  l  to  me ,j^and\he  same  will  have  our  prompt  attent: 

j//  V  v“rjr83paotm?- 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Western  Union  Telegraph  Company,  ™6s' 


J.  0.  Barclay,  Esq., 

Electrician,  Chicago,  m 

Dear  Sir: 


0inoinna.tl,_...0...»...July...21s.t/99- _ 189 


Attached  see  bill  from  Thos.  A.  Edison  for  royalty  on  phono- 
Plex.  We.  have  ,riot  used  the- phbnoplex  sets  between’ Cincinnati  and  Ortlur*- 
.  bhs , or. between1  'Cincinnati  and  Springfield  tike  year.  The  Lexington  set 
lam  U06  every  day.  "Shkll  we  Pay  the  bin; under  above  circumstances. 


(ThiliiKy 


[ENCLOSURE] 


I.  N.  Miller,  July  21st.,  1899/ 


Forwards  bill  from  Thos..  A.  Edison  for  royalty  on  phonoplex 
circuits  Cincinnati,  0. ,  to  Columbus,  0.,  Cincinnati  to  Lexington 
and  Cincinnati  to  Springfield.  States  we  have. not  used  the 
phonoplex  sets  between  Cincinnati  and  Columbus  or  between  Cincin¬ 
nati  and  Springfield  this  year. 


Rospectfully  returned  to 

I.  N.  Miller, 


Esq.,  Sup e r in t ai dent. 


I  fail  to  find  any  notice  from  you  that  the  Columbus- 
Springfield  phonoplex  circuit  was  discontinued  January  1st.  ,0n 
what  date  were  we  notified?  !  The  notice  that  you  had  discontinued 
the  use  of  the  use  of  the  Columbus- Cincinnati  circuit  Jan-  1st..  ' 
was  not  received  until  a  short  time  ago  -  too  late  to  notify  the  - 
Edison  people  before  sending  out  tteir  semi-anmal  statement. 

Please  advise  me  promptly  when  you  discontinue  the  use  of  any, 
of  the  -  phoriopl  ex  circuits  so  1  can  keep  our  accounts  straight  with' 
the  Edison  people.  •  Pl9ase  return  these  papers  and  1  will  take:. 

'  up"  the  question  of  royalty  on  the  two  discontinued  circuits. 


Chicago,  July.  27th.,  1899. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


J,  C.  Barclayy  Electrician,  Chicago  i’ll.  Jul.  27th 
Correspondence  in.  regard  to  paying  royalty  on  phonoplex -instruments 
between  Cincinnati  and  Columbus  0.  and  betweem  Cincinnati  and  Springe- 
field  0.  :  • 

Respectfully  returned  to  J.  C.  Barclay,  Electrician,  Chicago  Ill. 

I  believe  the  understanding  was  when  these  Instruments  were  supplied, 
ifhey  were  to  be  used  when  we  were  short  of  wires  between  Cincinnati 
totfk  Columbus.  At  that  time  we  had  so  many  leased  wires  that  there 
^W'.iLOt  enough  available  for  our  own  business,  but  for  the  past 
si#  fikthths  we  have  had  plenty  of  wires  and  there  was  no  occasion 
to i*  tiding  the  phonoplex.  Neither  Mb.  Ti.lghman  nor  myself  romembof 
jfflUt  «f<ySfdSpondence  which  required  thbt  -Wldl  Bhauld,  .nidlte  a 
’thfr  fnstJfeaments.  w.ore;.not-in-:us<J.  W  ara  liftbifr  to  W 

%houi4.  ws^rdn  short  'of  wires. 


Hand  me  a  check  of  the  Edison  Mfg.  do.  for  $1310.00,  in  payment 
as  per  this  letter  attached.  Proper  bill  for  this  will  come  from 
D.  28.  &  D.  in  a  day  or  tvro. 


12/20/99. 

Enc-L 


V.  E.  G. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


%Cr,  t>Qy,.  K 

■  ^/r‘r//r////  ••  tftr //•////  ,5"  f^lr //•///  fs/rt/.j/J. 
/  f7’  |  •  '  (,J 


National  Phonograph  Co 
Orange, 

N.J. 


December  18,  1899. 

fftF.CF.IVED] 

•  DF.C.-liH899  I 


Lstil 


Wo  beg  to  acknowledge  receipt  Of  your  letters  of  the 
16th  and  16th  insts.  returning  to  us  the  executed  application 
papers  for  registration  of  trademark  in  the  name  of  Mr.  Edison 
in  the  several  countries  mentioned  by  you. 

We  beg  to  enclose  a  statement  of  account  covering  the 
cost  of  these  trademarks  amounting  to  §1310,  being  our  original 
estimate  of  §1260,  to  which  we  have  added  the  cost  of  a  trade¬ 
mark  in  British  India.  If  convenient,  please  send  us  a  check 
for  this  amount,  since  a  very  large  part  of  it  requires  to  be 
immediately  disbursed  by  us. 

We  will  proceed  with  the  filing  of  the  applications  for 
the  several  trademark  registrations  immediately. 


Yours  very  truly, 


(P.L.D.) 

(Enclosure) 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Messrs.  Dyer,  Edmonds 


Dear  Sira; 


r.>  Dyer, 

fit. , 

Hew  york. 


V/e  duly  received  your  favors  of  Dec.  18th,  and  note  that,  sam 
are  addressed  to  the  national  Phonograph  Co.  Inasmuch  as  this  trade¬ 
mark  will  always  remain  the  property  of  Mr.  Edison  personally,  lie  de¬ 
sires  that  all  correspondence,  payments,  etc.,  be  made  by  us.  I 
enclose  you  herewith  check  to  your  order  for  §1310.00,  to  cover  all  of 
this  work,  as  requested.  In  the  meantime,  I  return  your  invoice,  made 
out  against  the  national  phonograph  Co.,  and  would  ask  that  you  canool 
same  and  send  me  a  new  invoice  in  the  name  of  this  concern. 

I  will  have  gotten  out  for  you  38  small  metal  plates,  such  as  you 
require,  showing  the  trademark,  made  up  in  the  manner  indicated,  and 
send  them  to  you  at  the  quickest  possible  moment.  Does  the  fact  that 
the  papers  were  signed  by  Mr.  Edison  as  "Thomas  Alva  Edison",  whereas 
the  plates,  and  in  fact,  the  trademark  itself,  is  made  "Thomas  A.  Edison" 
make  any  difference? 


Yours  very  truly. 


tfSS/lW 


General  Manager, 


1899.  Edison-Saunders  Compressed  Air  Company  (D-99-10) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  concerning 
the  patents  possessed  or  considered  for  purchase  by  the  Edison-Saunders 
Compressed  Air  Co.  relating  to  the  development  of  a  pneumatic  motor. 
Included  is  a  letter  from  William  L.  Saunders  of  the  Ingersoll-Sergeant  Drill 
Co.  to  Walter  S.  Mallory  of  the  New  Jersey  and  Pennsylvania  Concentrating 
Works  evaluating  existing  patents.  Also  included  is  a  statement  of  company 
accounts  for  the  period  1899-1904. 

All  of  the  documents  have  been  selected  except  for  one  routine  report 
of  patent  claims. 


AIR  COMPRESSORS; ROCK  DRILLS. 

COAL  CUTTERS.  STONE  CHANNELING  MACHINES. 

GADDERS. QUARRY  BARS.  BLASTING  APPARATUS. 

BOILERS.  HOISTS. 

K»^TCNTS  HavemeyerBu/ld/ng26Cortlandt$t. 


ST.SANFRANaSCO.CAL. 

wi»SmEET.DENVER£OU>. 


A~andWacouta  Sts. ST.  PAULMINN. 
308  First  Avt-SountSEATTLE, WASH, 

.  Cable  Address: 

/mmHmNevrYbmr  'E/mu  London' 


My  dear  Sir: - 

I  find  that  I  have  neglected  to  return  the  enclos¬ 
ed  letter  from  Mr.  Dyer  to  Mr.  Edison.  Generally 
spoalcing  I  agroo  with  fir.  Dyer  in  his  reference  to  the 
Parke  Patents,  but  I  must  differ  'with  him  on  some 
points,  for  instance  ho  says  in  reference  to  the  first 
Parke  Patent:'  "The  circulation  through  or  around  the 
combustible  is  effected  solely  by  the  incroaso  in  tem¬ 
perature  produced  by  the  combustion,  which  must  be  very 
slight  indeed  when  a  solid  combustible  is  used".  This 
circulation,  in  my  judgment ,  is  likely  to  be  sufficient 
and  the  increase  in  temperature  is  likely  to  be  con¬ 
siderable.  I  quite  agree,  with  Mr.  Dyer  in  that  all 
the  claims  of  the  first  Parke  Patent  are  limited  to  the 
reservoir,  and  while  this  device  will  probably  work  yet 
in  my  judgment  it  is  inferior  in  every  respect  to  Mr. 
Edison's  idea  and  in  no  way  interferes  with  it. 

The  second  Parke  Patent  seems  to  me  to  be  more 
valuable  than  the  first.  I  do  not  think  that  the  in¬ 
tention  is  to  pass  all  the  compressed  air  through  the 
c ombus t i on  chamber,  but  only  so-  much  of  it  as  may  be 
nocessary  to  maintain  a  desired  temperaUire .  I  cannot 
agree  with  Mr.  Dyer  when  he  say6  that  the  device  would 
not  be/ operative .  As  a'mattor  of  fact  it  has  worked. 
Mr.  Dyer:  gives  as  a  reason  that  :"  The  solid  combus¬ 
tible'  material  on  the  grate  would  produce  such  a  drop 
in  pressure  as  to  cause,  etc".  I  do  not  know  what  he 
means  by  drop  in  pressure  as  there  would  in  my  judgment 
be  no  drop  in  pressure  due  to  the'. passage  of\air  over, 
the  coals .  \ 


I  quite  agree  with  Mr.  Dyer  in  his  comparaison  between  this  Parke 
Patent  and  Mr.  Edison’s  idea.  It  is  better  to  take  a  fraction  of 
the  compressed  air  and  pass  it  through  the  fire  as  Mr.  Edison  does. 

On  general  principles  I  vrould  like  to  see  the  Parke  Patents 
owned  by  the  Kdison-Sannders  Company,  not  that  they  are  of  any 
special  value,  as  I  think  we  have  the  most  valuable  Patents,  but 
as  the  Parke  Patents  have  never  done  anybody  any  good,  perhaps  they 
‘may  bo  bourdit  cheap. 


Yours  truly. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Dear  Sir:- 

We  have  received  your  notes  in  reference  to  the 
patents  relating  to  the  reheating,  of  compressed  air.  These 
patents  do  not,  in  our  opinion,  materially  affect  the  situa¬ 
tion. 

It  is  true  that  in  both  patents  to  Parke,  No.  481,623 
and  613,053,  solid  fuel,  such  as  charcoal,  is  referred  to, 
but  this  is  about  as  far  as  the  patentB  go.  In  the  first  of 
the  Parka  patents,  is  employed 

"a  distinct  and  separate  reservoir  or  chamber  interposed 
between  the  source  of  the  compressed  air  supply  and  the 
motor,  having  connected  therewith  a  separate  combustion 
chamber,  in  which  the  combustion  occurs  continuously,  be¬ 
ing  supported  by  the  oxygen  contained  in  the  compressed 
air,  which  is  kept  in  circulation  wholly  or  in  part  by 
the  process  ' of  combustion"  (p.  2,  lines  86  to  96). 

With  this  device,  the  circulation  through  or  around  the  combust¬ 
ible  is  effected  solely  by  the  increase  in  temperature  produced 
by  .the  oombustlon,  which  must  be  very  slight  indeed  when  a 
solid  combustible  is  used.  Furthermore,  any  differences  in 
the  consumption  of  the  compressed  air  translating  devices  will 
have  no  bearing  whatever  upon  the  heating  effect.  All  the 
claims  of  the  first  Parke  patent  are  limited  to  the  reservoir 


In  the  second  Parke  patent,  a  Bolid  combustible  is  con¬ 
sumed  in  a  combustion  chamber.  We  agree  with  you  that  the 
intention  seems  to  bo  to  normally  pass  all  the  compressed  air 
through  the  combustion  chamber.  We  do  not  believe  the  device 
would  be  operative,  since  the  solid  combustible  material  on  the 
grate  would  produce  such  a  drop  in  pressure  as  to  cause  the 
cold  air  to  elevate  the  controlling  valve  and  pass  directly  to 
the  translating  devioe.  Furthermore,  this  drop  in  pressure 
would  depend  absolutely  upon  the  amount  of  fuel  in  the  combus¬ 
tion  chamber,  so  that  the  operation  of  the  device  would  depend 
entirely  upon  the  quantity  of  the  combustible.  We  would  say 
that  the  most  that  can  be  said  of  the  second  Parke  patent  is 
that  he  has  reversed  your  idea,  and  passes  the  bulk  of  the 
air  through  the  combustion  chamber,  effecting  regulation  by 
cooling  off  the  air  by  the  admission  of  cold  air  through  the 
by-pass,  while  with  your  system',  the  maintenance  of  temperature 
is  effected  by  regulating  the  small  amount  of  intensely  heated 
air  in  the  by-pass.  In  other  words,  with  the  Parke  patent, 
the  combustion  chamber  is  in  the  main  line  pipe,  while  with 
your  system  the  combustion  chamber  is  in  the  by-pass. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


(T.  A.  13. ,  3) 

In  the  Judson  patent,  oil  or  gas  is  burned  in  a  combus¬ 
tion  chamber  adapted  to  be  connected  in  the  pipe  line.  We 
think  it  clear  from  tho  patent  that  Judson  intended  either  to 
pass  all  the  air  through  the  combustion  chamber  or  to  pass  all 
the  air  around  the  combustion  ohamber.  For  instance,  he  says 
that  the  two  valves  are  "adapted  to  throw  the  air  through  the 
re-heating  ohamber,  or  pass  it  out  of  contact  with  the  burner 
at  will"  (p.  1,  lines  62  et  seq.).  In  describing  the  oper¬ 
ation,  he  makes  no  reference  to  a  sub-division  of  the  air.  He 
says:- 

"In  case  it  is  desired  to  examine  the  burner,  the 
air  may  be  temporarily  conducted  to  the  motor-section 
through  pass-pipe  D"  (page  1,  lines  90; et  sag, ) . 

From  this,  we  think  it  clear  that  the  only  purpose  of  the  pass- 
pipe  in  the  Judson  device  was  to  enable  the  combustion  chamber 
to  be  cut  off  when  desired.  In  all  essential  respects,  there¬ 
fore,  the  Judson  apparatus  seems  to  be  about  the  same  as  the 
apparatus  of  the  Saunders  patent,  which  wo  have  before  consid¬ 
ered. 

Our  views  on  the  question  are  as  follows:- 

1.  It  is  new  to  employ  a  by-pass,  through  which 
will  be  conveyed  a  small  portion  of  the  compressed  air  to  be 
directly  heated. 

2.  It  is  new  to  provide  a  substantially  uniform  drop 
in  pressure  in  a  by-pass,  to  cause  air  to  be  forced  through 
the  same  in  a  quantity  dependent  upon  the  consumption  of  the 
translating  devices,  whereby  automatic  regulation  will  be  se- 


[ENCLOSURE] 


(T1.  A.  B.,  4) 

cured. 

— is  n0w,  of  course,  to  utilize  all  the  heat  by 
directing  the  large  part  of  the  air  around  the  reheater,  where 
by  heating  will  be  effected  by  radiation  and  convection. 

We  will  take  up  the  application  immediately  and  make 
whatever  amendments  seem  to  us  to  be  necessary  in  view  of  thos 
references. 


Yours  very  truly. 


(F.L.D.) 


at*  'factor  TiiUtig  &  oerfrif  lcate  of  thla  kiftfct  is  #B*. 
Qofora  retarding  fhff  paper,  ^cfitaiy  affix  a  10^  XnterniO  Revenue 


8tam>»  ae  r«j|liiracl  by  koi  of  pongrpsa, 

ibtJv 


THE  MOTT  PATTERN  SHOP, 

DESIGNING,  MECHANICAL  DRAWING,  MODELS, 

M.  A.  SCOTT,  Proprietor.  C.  C.  scott,  Manager. 

TELEPHONE8i^f^VJ.%4.  -5  R.  REPLACE,  NEWARK,  N.  J.  - 


£>a £vt-WAj 


iff— 


//-?? 


A  2^  W 

\  i  / 


[ON  BACK  OF  PRECEDING  PAGE] 


,4s^  H-Uw. 


Q-yw.C  u/y/w/ft/j  '/.  At/tr; 

CfrrtuMr,^.  -J^tZcr 

'  m.a;,^,„.^.  a*.#,**** 

V/,,,/?/, >,■/?.  December  16,  1899. 


W.  S.  Uallory,  Esq., 

Sec’y  Edison-Saunders  Compressed  Air  Co., 

Orange,  N..T. 

Dear  Sir,- 

We  enclose  herewith  the  following  assignments: 
William  1.  Saunders  to  E.S.C.A.Co.  of  his  half  in¬ 
terest  in  U.S .  patent  486,411. 

Ingersoll-Sergeant  Drill  Co.  to  E.S.C.A.  Co.  of  its 
half  interest  in  same  patent. 

Thomas  A.  Edison  to  E.S.C.A.Co.  of  his  application 
Serial  No.  706,976  filed  February  27,  1899. 

These  assignments  have  been  duly  recorded  in  the 
Patent  Office.  Kindly  acknowledge  receipt,  and  oblige, 
Yours  truly,  -  r 


(W.P.) 

(Enclosures) 


[ENCLOSURE] 


WHEREAS,  I,  WILLIAM  L.  SAUNDERS ,  of  New  York  City, 
Rnjthe  County  and  state  of  New  York,  am  the  owner  of  an  un- 
jjivid0d  ona"half  interest  in  and  to  Letters  Patent  of  the 
£  Fnited  Statfls  No‘  486,411,  granted  November  15th,  1892,  upon 
|an  invention  relating  to  a  Method  of  Increasing  the  Effi¬ 
ciency  of  Motor  Fluids;  and 

WHEREAS,  EDISON-SAUNDERS  COMPRESSED  AIR  COMPANY,  a 
II corporation  organized  and  existing  under  the  laws  of  the 
State  of  New  Jersey  and  having  its  principal  place  of  busi¬ 
ness  at  West  Orange  in  the  County  of  Essex  in  said  State, 

!/  is  desirous  of  acquiring  all  my  rieht,  title  and  interest 
in  and  to  the  said  Letters  Patent  and  the  invention  covered 
thereby; 

NOW,  THEREFORE,  to  all  whom  it  may  concern,  be  it 
i  that,  for  and  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  One  Dol¬ 
lar,  to  me  in  hand  paid,  the  receipt  of  which  is  hereby  ack¬ 
nowledged,  and  other  valuable  considerations,  I,  the  said 
William. L.  Saunders,  have  sold,  assigned  and  transferred, 
knd  by  these  presents  do  sell,  assign  and  transfer,  unto 
fche  said  Edison-Saunders  Compressed  Air  Company,  its  succes¬ 
sors  and  assigns,  all  my  right,  title  and  interest  in  and 
J/T°  the  aferesaid  otters  Patent  and  the  invention  covered 
thereby;  the  same  to  be  held  and  enjoyed  by  the  said  Edison 
jSaunders  Compressed  Air  Company,  its  successors  and  assigns 
|  th6  ful1  and  of  tha  te™  for  which  said  Letters  Patent 
>  .or  may  be  granted,  as  fully  and  entirely  as  t>he  same 
would . have  been  held  by  me  had  this  assignment  and  sale  not 
Jpeen  made. 

IN  WITNESS  WHEREOF  I  have  hereunto  set  my  band  and 


[ENCLOSURE] 


j affixed  my  seal,  this  24th  day  of  April  ,  1899. 
|I»  the  pmn...  on  4&^~X/S _ 


t/  state  of  New  York,  : 

—  Jss: 

| County  of  New  York.: 

On  thiy4w^-day  ofxfeja^r^-y  1899,  before  me,  a 

I  Notary  Public  within  and  for  the  County  of  Kings,  Certifi¬ 
cate  filed  in  New  York  County,  personally  appeared  William 
1.  Saunders,  to  me  known  and  known  to  me  to  be  the  person 
described  in  and  who  executed  the  foregoing  assignment  and 
acknowledged  to  me  that  he  executed  the  same  for  the  purpos¬ 
es  therein  mentioned. 


KINGS  CO.,  / 


V 


[ENCLOSURE] 


y  63939 

,  & 

THE  INGERSOLL-SARGENT  DRIljf 
COMPANY, 

-to- 

EDISON-SAUNDERS  COMPRESSED  AIR'' 
COMPANY. 

assignment. 

SEE  RECORD  STAMP  INSIDE.-;  I 

T.':y 

,  p  .  ?  :•  ; . 

:-ti !• 

';  V:  :;  ; 

Byer.Edmonds  ^Dyer 

Attorneys  at  Law,  ’ 

3LMassau  St., 

1  1 

[ENCLOSURE] 


,  |  WHEREAS  the  undersigned,  THE  INGERS OLL- SERGEANT  DRILj} 
^0|iPAHY,  a  corporation  organized  and  existing  under  the  laws 
of  the  State  of  West  Virginia  and  having  a  place  of  business 
in  the  City  of  Hew  York,  County  and  State  of  New  York,  i^ 
the  owner  by  assignment  of  an  undivided  one-half  interest 
in  and  to  Letters  Patent  of . the  United  States  No'.  486,411, 
granted  November  15th,  1892,  upon  an  invention  relating  to 
Method  of  Increasing  the  Efficiency  of  Motor  Fluids;  and 

WHEREAS,  ED ISON-SAUNDERS  COMPRESSED  AIR  (coMPANY,  a 
[corporation  organized  and  existing  un^er  the  laws  of  the 


State  of  New  Jersey  and  having  its  principal  place  of  busi¬ 
ness  at  West  Orange,  in  the  County  of  Essex  in  said  State, 
is  desirous  of  acquiring  said  undivided  one-half  interest 
in  and  to  said  Letters  Patent  and  the  invention  covered 
thereby; 


NOW,  THEREFORE,  to  all  whom  it  may  concern,  be  it 
known,  that,  for  and  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  One  Dol- 
Lar,  to  it  in  hand  pa.id,  receipt  of  which  is  hereby  ack- 
lowledged,  and  other  valuable  considerations,  the  said  The 
Ingersoll-Sergeant  Drill  Company  has  sold,  assigned  and 
[/transferred,  and  by  these  presents  does  sell,  assign  and 
transfer,,  unto  the  said  Edison-Saunders  Compressed  Air  Com¬ 
pany,  its  successors  and  assigns,  its  entire  right,  title 
md  interest  in  and  to  the  said  Letters  Patent  and  the  in¬ 
dention  covered  thereby;  the  same  to  be  held  and  enjoyed  by 
;he  said  Edison-Saunders  Compressed  Air  Company,  its  suc- 
sessors  and  assigns,  to  the  full  end  of  the  term  for  which 
said  Letters  Patent  are  or, may  be  granted,  as  fully  and  en- 
Sirely  as  the  same  would  have  been  held  and  enjoyed  by  said 
•he  Ingersoll-Sergeant  Drill  Company,  had  this  assignment 
and  sale  not  been  made. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


IN  WITNESS  WHEREOF,  the  said  The  Inge  rsc^ll -Serge  ant 

I  Drill  Company  has  caused  these  presents  to  be  executed  and 
its  corporate  seal  affixed  thereto,  this  24th  day  of 
April  ,  1899,  by  its  Vice-President  and  Secretary 
thereunto  duly  authorized. 

THE  ING EfiSOLL-SEriG EAL'T  RCiL.LCO, 

(Attest:  _ 

“  "■  ‘  Yice-Pi'ea’t. 


IS  tat  e  of  New  York, 

County  of  New  York. 

On  this yL<S-  day  or  f  1899>  before 

10 '  a  Notary  Public  within  and  for  the  County  of  Kings,"  cer- 
SllBd  ln  NeW  Yt>rk  County»  Personally  appeared 
.  r  to  me  known,  and  who  acknowledged  that  he 

Es  the  Secretary  and  that  William  1.  Saunders  is  the  Vice^ 
resident  of. The  Ingersoll-Sergeant  Drill  Company,  and  that 
le  foregoing  assignment  was  executed  by  authority  of  the 
jard  of  Directors  of  said  Compaq 


[ENCLOSURE] 


1  .  v' 

:  .  ^  63939  . 

> 

_ - . 

(7^  2^-  5.J-! 

- . -.-  . . ?*f  . -| 

’  ^ 

THOMS  k.  EDISON, 

-to-  [ 

COMPANY^ 

A  S  S  I  SI  M  E  N  T’ V  i 

SEE  RECORD  STAMP  INSIDE; 

t.-?/  »  s  Sc-Ay-  '■ 

/tetr'-efifriK'  /  >; 

.  »f 

m 

Li  ; 

"  ; 

Dyer, Edmonds  8c Dyer, 

_ _  _ . i 

31  NasLuSt!*’ 

[ENCLOSURE] 


3  n|| 

il 

\\  j  'H 

IHn 

3 

d . 
S-j/  <? 


|g  2  WHEREAS,  I,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  of  Llewellyn  Park,  in 
J§h<?  County  of  Essex  and  'State  of  New  Jersey,  have  invented 
F  certain  new  and  useful  IMPROVEMENT  IN  THE  METHOD  OP  AND 
pUpPARATUS  POR  REHEATING  COMPRESSED  AIR  POR  INDUSTRIAL  PUR¬ 
POSES,  for  which  I  filed  an  application  for  Letters  Patent 
of  the  United  States  on' the  27tH‘ day  of  February,  1899,  Ser¬ 
ial  No.  706,976;  and 


WHEREAS,  EDISON-SAUNDERS  COMPRESSED  AIR  COMPANY,  a 
corporation  organized  and  existing  under  the  laws  of  the 


IState  of  New  Jersey  and  having  its  principal  place  of  busi¬ 
ness  at  West  Orange,  in  the  County  of  Essex  in  said  State, 
is  desirous  of  acquiring  my  entire  right,  title  and  interest 
in  and  to  said  invention  and  in  and  to  the  Letters  Patent 
to  bo  obtained  therefor; 


|  NOW,  THEREFORE,  to  all  whom  it  may  concern,  be  it 

Iknown  that,  for  and  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of  One  Dol¬ 
lar,  to  me  in  hand  paid,  receipt  of  which  is  hereby  ack¬ 
nowledged,  and  other  valuable  considerations,  I,  the  said 
Thomas  A.  Edison,  have  sold,  assigned  and  transferred,  and 
by  these  presents  do  sell,  assign  and  transfer, unto  the  said 
Edison-Saunders  Compressed  Air  Company,  its  successors  and 
y  assigns,  my  entire  right,  title  and  interest  in  and  to  the 
said  invention  and  the  application  for  Letters  Patent  re¬ 
ferred  to,  and  all  my  right,  title  and  interest  in  and  to  any 
Letters  Patent  of  the  United  States  that  may  be  granted 
therefor;  .  and  I  hereby^authorize  and  request  the  Commis¬ 
sioner  of  Patents  to  issue  such  Letters  Patent  to  the  said 
Edison-Saunders  Compressed  Air  Company,  its  successors  and 
assigns,  as  my  assignee. 

IN  WITNESS  WHEREOF,  I  have  hereunto  set  my  hand  and 


[ENCLOSURE] 


December  81.  1899. 


V7.  S.  Mallory  Bsq., 

C/o  Thomas  A.  Edison  Bsq., 
Orange, 

HE  W  JERSEY. 


Dear  Mr.  Mallory, 

You  will  remember  that  in  connection 
wifli  the  re-heater  we  discussed  the  ubs  of 
flexible  metallic  tubing.  X  enclose  sbme 
circulars  of  the  flexible  tubing  ,which  is 
used  here  successfully.  Please  'shovr  these  to 
Mr.  Ediron  and  I  will  take  the  matter  up 
further  with  you  on  my  return. 


Yours  faithfully. 


[ATTACHMENT] 


'tcLc^crtn _ —  '^cuisVM-cLojLA..  r!  CClA—  (3- 


"y^Lay^  2-  .  aAo  (ftjLArts i^iy<-C-  cu>  yflaJLn.  c^£Slje£sv*-\jiststA%  cLa.HcJL  . 

TfLcM-cb.  2-  3-iSciq-  £rtAZZn^c*-<-  _  cl,  . 

3tdL\A~cr\'t—  j  [A/^-1  A\,  ^LM^tetc^-  Ci^L^  t£\JL 
£)y^eyiAya^r£JL  .  ■^jRA^eayuiAr  Q3aJAL  &a — 
tr  A  t  ;  cAo  JLejeJuBylaji*^  ALcih cT GlA,  - 

Aa^.LXLoAj2  /  0^ut.cf 

C^o-aA~  ‘^-y  dyiyti^jiA  G-.yky,j ^  2.6  oe 

<?»  y4Ll£*-t^rpji^z^2j!tsVC-Ci’l<^  •^/?.fif.oW//(/i-(.^ 
sw^jzsi+sto  Ct-vt.<r/ 

TVtM'tAAjjLa  &r/°. 

<?t>  CL+^istr  JftAsoVOlAjL. 


&-trtrtf  -  8L£c~  ?fS~o. 

JytX\Sl-cMt^  ^cf  folcipr^  f 

&f24W2Jb<{ 

.  t  Gnstswty  C&dslS&i 

. ^.^r;  ^  *  .,«•*.; 

^2SL&^h*siJCxJ^ 

c^tAJ.A.^ef  (/3as<Mv3J^  sJa.cxAjsutAvj 

l<nA/bs*LC^  ?7l«si*sUtAjL  -&-zr-tr1{  - 

^i^LC  ^  £■£*3 _  <£~O.0O 

f»M  't&JL  C?t£rtrtf\.  COO  JZu!^  So^trtA^JC. 

*^y  *  £ct*oOA**o£l.  ?V/  ,t_-u-l-l-^--i. 

C?tf»  —  djLGSULl&Ot£^  ^LLcZAJl'  -^!-QJLg{  — 

CS^cA^k  7  “  ^7,  ^je^yoo  ytcoH  7t£xJL.  . 

,  ^-c*A*svx Ac  ^Lo  l/V1^  £  -  dco*AsoiJbL^ft -2.0  .C>.y  (* 

.  f &9*-  -  ■^ys£t><*c£*-  •&e£'*t  <xa^icy%ouLo(  . 

j  y0  Q  ^^Aufyo^^^CKAAyOKxijty\^  . 

O'VLCUU  .2-y  ;<7^  ^/UaAjcJL.  £W-  Js6-(9oo  2r*/-00_ 

,... . _...  .j_ (/3z£^tAAAfr\  .  ri  . /, ...  tt  . . -Ji^bl 

- ...  .  L . StoJUA^ - St. . ._f, _ !J _ it,.  _ _ /SfefjDl 

zz]  zj  za3Ziii.Z’.  ^=z_'zS 

- ! - ; - _ ft . ..ft . '* . . __  ^./.$.’Q.o\ 

- ; - i - ^JB/X^aaj&o**--  — -2.  '3*^^JLoyi tfcotf^ _ i 

.^4Aso4jb-*^-\ ... ..  _ /_ 

- X - S - - - Ga^hSisLJZc4 -  _ 1 


. 

6  .  c?o  y  ■^-e.ayi^j  sLa,%  -ir-t-t^  sCfcje-  _ 

/^.oAL^iAx  /to  MAT-  ^ •  •"'cl  dAA^t-eljui^ 

.#  2.0  t>  J  t>.  cr£  /S‘9t-  UrLo&tL  &xi*4 
,q0/-  ttuw  CVI^LA-^^CcL.  /to  SctuLtm.  -JbctAAMjJjU^ 

3  £?0  OXeAATi  Xi>-taA£  ^i  y. 

3.  /  cXo  ^<!^iM/teT.t_  trjt  ^cui, iXttA+g  xryve.  c^trtcL. 
f  <)o  2—  0lA~  c£oJl™A-ajtAi-^Vy^ 

•  CS-e-"A  ^Xu  (PctJjeAtAt~  <r^  lt/V?  X\.  '$>oaaa*JLc,ul. 

if-. 2.0  676  dtct/LefiC  "/j~-tS‘ji- 

..Xt'trtr ',  t  t^o  t2cis^  c^cCtlasu*^  (XexAj&ASl'T  #  &<}  y.3y. . 

QLo/t^  /O  c^o  *tleAA/\  Qjlsuia^c^  ^ttXX-eT  ZXetsf. 

/;  c^t>  it  ,,  n  '/ 


^^vLesubaJ*  tm  7?  <^2, ,  n  a  I 
^utryut^- f  t<T dyUX)  2,^  J  \'2°_~ 

G2</ln  .  y  :  </o  ^evULCQ 

ej{  \ \f  "fruM^  . ;_ 

.  — ■&suec£X£&>  __. 

/*■*?•  .  . - 

T^Lct^  2—  .{Xco'oJL'.  (fl'h.  ad.) 

ir  ■  a  ~  f  ty-£  /dAcuuup  c^  /d'ttrcJ(  aXt  jfz.an~— 

/f(7_p  !crt>  ■ftj’A  ALc^L^^QnXX^<S.oAs: 

^'tSA -\JL,  8 . a  t'  l/f/7  /Qa^wvtote^X ) 


1899.  Electric  Light  (D-99-11) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to 
electric  lighting  and  power.  Included  are  items  attesting  to  Edison's  continued 
relations  with  the  General  Electric  Co.  and  the  Edison  Electric  Illuminating  Co. 
of  New  York. 

Only  three  documents  have  been  selected.  The  items  not  selected 
consist  of  notices  regarding  the  bylaws  and  stock  of  the  Edison  Electric 
Illuminating  Co.  of  New  York  as  well  as  unsolicited  or  routine  correspondence 
concerning  electric  meters  and  central  stations. 


m  'vy 

. 


Referring  to  Utter  No.. 


New  York,  February  18,  1899. 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 

Orange,  N.  J. 

Dear  Sir:- 

In  view  of  the  pending  change  of/^wnership  of  the  majority 
of  the  capital  stock  of  this  Company,  it j/L  suggested,  at  the  mooting 
of  the  Board  of  Directors  held  Februa»Vl6th. ,  that  the  Secretary 
prepare  a  form  of  resignation  for  th/officers  and  directors  and  for¬ 
ward  for  signature.  It  is  unders^od  that  these  resignations  will  be 
handed  to  Mr.  Peabody  for  use  ij/the  event  that  the  proposed  transfer 
of  control  is  consummated. 

In  accordance  therewith,  I  beg  to  hand  you  the  enclosed  form- 
jesignation  and  ask  th/t  you  sign  it  and  return  in  'the  enclosed 
stat|ped  envelope. 

Yours  respectfully,  ( 


ftiMtuttJZ ?V«i 
/yrtnA  /..%/„■. 


-3)yw;( h/m/mu/i  fc.^yrr' 

&r/t:n/  6rr/./.JK/\  Tfe^.^VJfeir 

'  .sy.y(^.^«4 

!^v//  Sept  .  22 

A  .  - 


C>.  Sept  .  22V 1899. 


j\  •  ^/y 


l? 

tii L 


J  .  3? .  Randolph ,  Esq . , 

Edison  laboratory. 

Orange,  H.J. 

Dear  Mr.  Randolph, ~ 

X  send  you  correspondence  with  regard  to  the  titll 
to  two  of  Mr.  Edison's  patents.  I  don't  know  anything  about 
this  matter,  and  thinking  that  you  may,  I  send  the  papers  to  you. 
Kindly  return  the  correspondence  with  your  reply. 

Yougs^ve rq  truly 


(R.N.D.) 

(Enclosure) 


[ENCLOSURE] 


FISH,  RICHARDSON  &  STORROW, 
COUNSELLORS  AT  LAW, 


40  WATER  STREET,  BOSTON.  80  BROADWAY,  NEW  YORK. 


NEW  YORK,  September  20,99, 

Richard  N.  Dyer,  Esq., 

31  Nassau  Street,  New  York. 

My  dear  Mr.  Dyer: 

I  enclose  a  letter  from  Davi  s  to  which  a  copy  of  one 
from  Meadoworoft  is  attached.  You  have  followed  the  title  to 
Edison  patents  and  can  probably  tell  me  at  onoe  whether  the 
General  Electric  Company  should  have  the  two  to  which  this  cor¬ 
respondence  relates.  Please  return  the  enclosed. 

Yours  very  truly, 

dpT-Pt  , 


[ENCLOSURE] 


July  11,  1899. 


F.  P.  Fish,  Esq., 

New  York  City, 


Dear  sir: 


I  enclose  herewith  a  copy  of  a  letter  from  Mr.  Meadow- 
croft,  relating  to  patents  of  Mr.  Edison,  which,  apparently, 
should  belong  to  us.  These  patents  do  not  seem  to  be  very  im¬ 
portant  at  present,  but,  obviously,  it  would  be  well  to  have  them 
assigned  to  us,  if  such  an  assignment  is  proper. 


agd/cih 
Enclosure . 


Yours  truly. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Harrison,  N.J.,  July 

Albert  G.  Davis,  Esq., 

Pat  ent  Dept . 

General  Electric  Co., 

Schenectacfr  ,  u.Y. 

Dear  sir: 

Referring  once  more  to  the  two  Edison  patents  No .  v470, 924 
and  No.  ^34,208,  I  would  say  that  I  went  to  the  office  of  Messrs. 
Eaton  &  Lewis,  and  looked  over  a  lot  of  ‘he  old  papers  there  relat¬ 
ing  to  assignments  of  patents,  in  connection  with  which  I  did 
some  work  for  Messrs.  Eaton  &  lewis  between  1892  and  1896. 

The  old  contracts  between  Mr.  Edison  and  the  Edison 
Electric  light  Company  called  for  an  assignment  by  him  to  the 
company  of  all  inventions  covering  electric  lighting  generally, 
made  by  him  up  to  January  12th,  1886,  and  for  a  further  period  of 
three  years  from  November  25th,  1887,  of  inventions  relating  to 
incendescent  lamps  and  their  manufacture. 

The  Edison  General  Electric  Company  made  an  agreement 
with  Mr.  Edison  October  1st,  1890,  known  as  the  "laboratory  A- 
greement",  under  which  his  subsequent  indentions  for  a  stated  pe¬ 
riod  were  to  be  assigned  to  the  Edison  General  Electric  Company. ' 

Up  to  the  early  part  of  1896,  so  far  as  I  know,  there 
had  been  no  agreement  covering  Mr.  Edison's  general  electric  light 
inventions  for  the  period  between  January  12th,  1886,  and  the  date 
of  the  laboratory  Agreement,  October  1st,  1890. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


A  short  tine  prior  to  March  1st,  1896,  Major  Eaton  had 
been  given  to  understand  that  a  new  contract  had  been  arranged  by 
Mr,  Eish  between  Mr.  Edison  and  the  General  Electric  Company  cover¬ 
ing  all  his  inventions  during  this  open  period,  and  an  asagnment 
of  such  patents  as  had  then  been  issued'  was  sent  by  Major  Eaton 
to  Mr.  Edison  for  execution,  but  so  far  as  I  can  ascertain,  it  was 
never  returned. 

As  I  recollent  it,  there  waa  quite  considerable  dis¬ 
cussion  between  the  Officers  and  Counsel  of  the  Company  on  this 
matter  at  the  time,  and  it  was  thought  very  desirable  to  cover 
this  open  period  by  some  arrangement  with  Mr.  Edison,  and  my 
impression  is  that  there  was  some  kind  of  a  general  settlement 
with  him  under  the  laboratory  Agreement,  and  that  the  assignment 
of  inventions  during  this  open  period  was  arranged  for. 

The  two  patents  above  named  belong  to -the  open  period 
above  referred  to,  taking  the  date  of  filing  the  application  as 
the  date  of  the  invention.  The  application  for  patent  No. 

470,924  was  filed  September  30th,  1887,  and  for  patent  No.  534,208, 
on  May  2,  1888. 

Hi.  boat  thing  I  cm  anggeet  at  present  i.  that  yon  m„. 
nicat.  rtth  Mr.  Plan  and  an*  ]lim  u  „  „  ^  ^  ^  ^  . 

abor.  named  arrangement  „„  „,d.  ,ith  ^  „  So  ^  ^ 

,  W“’  patents  coma  be  prepared  and  to 

Mr.  Edison  for  his  execution. 

If  I  can  te  of  further  qssistance  in  the  matter,  please 
command  me. 

Very  truly  yours. 


W.  H.  Meadowcroft 
Secy/ 


1899.  Fort  Myers  (D-99-12) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to 
Edison's  home  and  property  at  Fort  Myers,  Florida.  Included  are  items 
pertaining  to  the  repair,  shingling,  and  painting  of  the  house,  and  an  undated 
memorandum  regarding  a  steamship  and  railroad  freight  route  to  Fort  Myers. 

All  of  the  documents  have  been  selected. 


u  /,  p  Z' 


(7&)  . 

/)  •  /<6/'  -^ff- 

./%•  $(/?  J  ^ 

dQ-est-u-  Si^- 

J  P'/^******^'  sj.  £2  c  <r4>  ■  ^ &hsau?tJ^ 

&ls  -  . . . 

fot-rnsZ/to  Itfa^co  d'l~  /  ^e-t-*,^  ■/  f ^  S' 

%>  A*.  /‘V  <*?■  /rff~  <sl  j/zs^o-o 

Jb?T.-  u-r  t-i~  U/fistt/T"  0"P  /'£-—  (fol-iTt- ‘-•^y  fl-Ct,* t-*-w 

&4n*-eL  ^rr-  Z  lT^^\)  <y~  ¥pu-6j 


^nuix*.  L*  -u-  (l/e^y  <(-*-*.  GU,^e?C1_'C.  n~  d  ^  JjtUZfr 

0~  ryu t^c-  tyh.n-i^c+7  i/j-.  £/?■  (t/ist*.  dtp*u-*—  ,/CZs- 

^  •■^'  J—h-xisL*-  d  jfi-t-t-~j£**e,  . /^L*. 

L4  U-  psr-lrr^  A.a^yJvx*  f**^-aS/~  £r  ffCo-.  J £*i^l*'— 

a--  G-\4'p*~£c~ ,  £sp 0*4,14*1-*'  J-  &PUy  ts/iLo^  t/fr  Wtn-tZ"-  &<rt-*-' 

As-C-  b*4*.  /£-•£<-  ZZ'Lc-4-'  u*£,  £>  &->-■/  /£.  d-niA.  (,  flsuu—  b.jcs/o>  t  x* 

a*  „/}  /t/fyU-d-  4/£/u.<-t7L  !??■'  /Z<t»3*-'  6L/^  Qu*->_  /Le**,  ly**-— 

. ds, . r 


[ON  BACK  OF  PRECEDING  PAGE] 


f\r  AJiX,  <n>\A~.  'fx/ny  (H-UACAy 

I  /Unn-v^cjO  CaA  'ho  kJLsjl  ^^vva#u-  ./ 

'  Ocrvd  ch  h)  A  (Hmjo  tt)  /l&iify.cLi  .udfcL .  1  ,| 


to  b\SUL  fiUs~ 


(fiwi  bwi 


% 


C-t^cJ-Ou  ZZ~  4^  tejlC aiZi) 


fas)-  Ci~  Zd~  Pt-l 

/y4^e->  -  y^L<-  sS*r-7-fi.  «-  &* ■■e-^^,a_  u^- 

<*-  Ph^Ly-Cj.  0*n~~<-  spfcL . 
e^ccx  Ar^i  >  c,  ~v-?--i-*^  /lAa^p*0-&~>  ■  X<_  Tfct^PZf  /£a^- 

UciXj~  (3^-t^-  s^>y  (h-LO^_  ?US?~ 

■■^h  4/t^*r  .^c  .^a-tyC.'  p%Z>  ,  Ph*L^  /£<_  /&-£-£<*  Obu/L^ 

@'&-y./}-  Aivi^.  Jn^a^Luu<f  A/^Lo  MruA^-  £T  /fcj-  _ 

Ctr-r^c.  S-M/J:  £-rr.  ItOyiyU.  flA.as/7^_ 

tS%  HfAjriP-eA-  b-  A-  J-  Jthutsfa^  0^z.t,  4^-^-  oLq  (Ssjala^ 

fhn-  SPc*?{0m_x*^S  tt/&.JlA-7,  <**  ■_**_  <*«-«. 

Pl  ccc<-<S-  tostXt.  2?£>«^4  OjsPViS-  C P—tlt&dflJL.  &-C.£sf~  </-  £h'fiC*-6  _. ^2£uu<J) _ 


foisU  AsC?  .  (c>S.  -  CT^/tA  1 

^  '  2.0  *  /Sf? 


■■  IP,' r£dt*Ci~ 

0**^  /&-*--  *S^t 

<A  (^77- 

(Zkal  (fij-ajp&Ar" y4<t-  /ItPr  /bzA-A~. 

^  cz-Ast-v  A^st-  AA. ~jfi 

/2-isCl  f-r*'  'Ze^ia. i/  t£^*?ijjf&pt_i’ 

A-Zs/z.  <7Ht-  (o£Co<L-&u*.  Z\AtjoA  £c-  A**<7 

jb-  e. tosC-mst-  yl&iA.  &pt^p  0t*c  sl-su*^xj 

^v>  Pfcuj  aA**)  P%u.AL*,  i f  krifCL  iitsis** 

fartiA.  /  Akz.  ^LAstAZtsO  /&*_-<<  AAsts^JA.  CytAO  S~  /c?Utsfls</ 

/-  txA  U/“ft.tt4-  p*-  fot-AuAC*  v.  fcuy  Cc/ix^A^ 

*A  J-isv-  /  rjvir.  Z*.  /  °f~ rfi  _ . . 

<J  aC*~* ****  tt*.  far.  Pr  jtfi,  p&tus&i^,  AlAc  0^£ 
(x/tAo  s*Cl  a^G}  <g^t.^r  <j> ' (hr* 


Ai  &v  9^i  LA-e^i.  isu^a^teC  A-<~  AsC,  AisseP^  Aa, 
^ushsj  Q^A-  <fT-ist~-eAL  /ZrUs*  Ct  oA^7Z^-A~  AT  fits. 
6-i+*-<^sLALfr  a^fificZs*^  Aui**-*-  Aa**.  _ ; 

*f£ts>  dct-<>-~ 

J  WtrU-AcC  Pfij-  fry-  fins*  £»  Ot^A-Ap, 

Ats^Cisi^'pL^ _  fiZ  A-AstAh-**'  Afcs.  ^sTUst^  ^LomjCu*. 

fiC  (UItUsLaL  O^isyjyL  ?TCLpA>  fLctstst^A  fan. 

*SAcZ^fifast^./  A/a^v,  iTli^*.  ffTAAstAj  /i(lsts&uf^sS*4^cA> 

\ffi~ .  li/rusCtL-  41aCsU-a-  A'Cha-'^ <c.  (~cZL —  Jkrfi 

J  tv~t*3yl*.  Qyy^-  ^&CtseAs*~-  Cst-ts-A-A.  py*ff//Zje~  £t) 

Atsuft-  ^tu.  1^.  [A-  h/a  pii-sZy  ^n,  aa.  jf&C4' 

(^AUsf^s)  _  Aff-lAsA*-  >6~C.,  IftstsUt^fi.  fisC^AM>  Cffi-  y^_ 

WtnACA-  AaIsAlas  cl  AjstsLs, 

#s/lrVAZT)e(LtZ.£ZA-  a.  ptstfurtsA  o~h  fart.  .—•  . 

(J^L.  ^tt.>n„  ^is4Sl**—  ^s<A-.  Ay  CL^^tPpxA  CA-r  Cpsfsi^ 

Af1^-  (A-  . (^~Tc£i-/sLS  . .  . . . . 

fyi*—  yi^u^y 

rC  O 

. . sAc2AP<-*t  t&VZlslAs 


•^eZiSery-  op.  /rfu.  J2-6  - 

j  (LcXBe^u'€^ ■#-  /foti'.  /ZXLez-^.'  <ty-n-o/- 
(foir/e-t (%2-^-n/h 

/e.  6C  jCo  ^rzZ^isn/4-  //c.  t&^frTMLe,  _  c/~ 

Ct/)~  A-t-r isis  £X^> 

fan-  (4- .  £*SiAa.  4w-t  /£z.^ns~‘  e/^  ie/i/j> 

(Ztc<*.csh-  'Ausi^-  J-  ti/isCt  L.<Ls/t->-  A-ist*-J-  /%~  /ha^Jvv4, 

0-  Li /k^  / ,f*~ (/yen/:  LLo-  fory 

^/.Cr -Uvn^n^y,  .  /s^_  J  jU#~tr  4<«/u 

Lhm-  s&-tLLu/iy.'Q  (U-ae^u  Ltu  -^J / 6 

.  . ^enn^i  /uvts/p 

(Scsiaseti?  ■■ 


ffaCL  rf  (Pa^t4~  yU  ft™ 

(p&t As#-  $/■ 

^4*—.  <Sl/hL  /%*/??<? 

/  ^  tS^Ztx-e.tr.  C^ai^  {f>Z^zt^- 

J-S-^auZ,  ff/c^(fa.  " 

\2  ‘^.aJZ?  (£Z£j^&}  j  * 

/  Sf  (  f.  t^cX^zAs  J  ,r 

jL<$  if  J?-e.^t_  ifeo-tr^  ,. 

S  //  &&ct^CC-  0-cSC*  A. 

ft*  O-ud-  -£<_  <zCe_  A/ifSfe. 

(Z^-tH-i^y  Arf-t*  /S^CX^^Ay,  /^  <3~Z J4L 

zfCJZa-* 

&UlA-(  ^T— 1  ^/'z—M<lAc^  StCc^U-  /&siU<ts6-a*>] 
^~wZ  j£-e~zr&  ^  ^rf-<>  £L 

..ivT^r  /ZhZ' 


'  (Vuj-e-n5 


orange*  H.J. 

Gentlemen: 

T/e  beg  to  advise  that  we  received  the  following  order 
over  the  telephone  to-day-  and  which  we  would  request  you  kindly 
confirm: 

P«  W.  Devoe  &  00*5.  Lead  &  Zinc  Paints. _ 

1  barrel.-  40  gallons  -  #682 
.  l/a  "  -  25  »  -  #647 

l/a  "  -  25  "  -  #666 

2-1  gallon  cans  -  —  #544 

1-1  "  can  -  #583 

1  -  26  can  Putty  - 

1-1  gal.  can. Light  Hard!  Oil  Pinlsh- 
l/3  doz.  -  3  l/2"  Brushes 
l/e  doz.  Sash  Tools. 

The  goods  are  to  be  shipped  to  MR.  JAS.  EVANS,'  PORT 
MZERS,  PLA.  - 


Mr.  Thos.  A.  Edison. 


-2- 

Also  kindly  advise  us  the  route  by  which  you  desire 
us  to  make  shipment . 

Awaiting  your  reply,  we  remain, 


[ON  BACK  OF  PRECEDING  PAGE] 


1899.  Mining  (D-99-14) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to 
mining  and  ore  milling.  Many  of  the  letters  were  written  in  response  to  reports 
of  Edison's  interest  in  developing  a  separation  process  for  gold  ore.  Also 
selected  is  a  2-page  advertisement  explaining  Edison's  "dry  placer  process  for 
the  separation  of  gold  from  gravel  without  the  use  of  water,"  a  process 
experimentally  developed  at  the  West  Orange  laboratory  and  tested  at  the  Ortiz 
Mine  in  Dolores,  New  Mexico. 

Approximately  15  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  Most  of 
these  items  received  a  significant  response  from  Edison.  The  following  items 
have  not  been  selected:  unsolicited  letters  that  did  not  receive  a  significant 
response  from  Edison,  letters  enclosing  samples  of  ore  or  minerals  for 
analysis,  and  construction  specifications  for  elevators  at  the  New  Jersey  Zinc 
Co.  works.  Also  not  selected  is  a  19-page  manuscript,  undated  and  unsigned, 
of  a  lecture  entitled  "Edison  and  Iron." 


&<it&trip''/5-S7  ffiroas/’  &J57/a&y%i 

<sj£%6™€'  Feb-  21 »  m 


Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison, 
Menlo  Park, 

Nevr  Jersey. 

Dear  Mr.  Edison,- 


A  member  of  the  Gates  Iron  Works  of  Chicago,  who  was 
dining  with  me  to-day  at  the  Lawyer’s  Club  and  who  knows  of  the  big 
plant  we  are  ereoting  in  Chioago  for  the  briquetting  of  coal  dust, 
thus  utilizing  the  waste  of  the  coal  mines,  stated  that  you  had  a 
large  produot  of  iron  dust,  which  from  the  fineness  of  the  mesh  and 
in  Its  present  condition  it  was  impracticable  to  send  to  the  smelters, 
and  thought  that  by  using  the  same  process  of  binding  the  dust  that  we 
do  in  the  briquette  that  you  could  utilize  your  dust  ana  ship  in  the 
form  of  a  briquette  to  the  smelters. 

Our  prooess  is  patented  and  consists  of  5J?  of  pitch  and  2#  of 
lime.  We  send  you  by  express  this  afternoon,  charges  prepaid,  a 
briquette  raede  from  the  waste  of  an  anthracite  coal  mine.  Our  new 
briquettes  will  bo  more  oval  in  shape,  thus  doing  away  with  the  rough 
edges  in  order  to  prevent  abrasion.  This  briquette  has  had  several 
heavy  shipments  and  Is  sent  to  you  simply  as  a  suggestion.  If  it  • 
should  interest  you  we  would  be  glad  to  go  into  the  matter  further. 


THE  EXPLORATION  SYNDICATE, 


Sow* 


[ATTACHMENT] 


iOo 


U/'vt£- 

fl^vV  WUCL  W^.  <&&  O™.  N~ 

rtr  * 

Xri  dk. 


"T 

oXCi«~~| 


dL-o-^ 

|-t3TAA,  • 

6-r  \~r..\*jcMLt~*3 


L 

Uri 


,*-vo'fcvr=fw'  .  \*j-e**J-* 
(©0  p-O  £? 


0  Broad  Street.  ?£Hk  fS  9  AA?^- 

^  Cf  G^VVvi 

'7yL^^  &C Je/y^  /CA~zs  "T^-tyi*-^  ■■  c- 


95!V.^^l^..  S-x^-^t.;’  9^6 

"  ••  V;~x^r;  • 

-^C^<  /^< 

•t^(  ■j0*~y(x-)  ><a>  >.  ^^-^v-L, 

^*-*-*2-^1  **£-7  ^  '2^/  ‘''-'t-cr^  (o yd^Ca^. 

<£(Z.  -1<  ^  ■■■  ■  ■  \  -:'-  \  ••  •■ 


•  ^’■•{'^.^<r  Z/V, 


?•  ^hW' . 


— hOFFICE  OF-H—  „tr  Tf  P 

/f .  IPoflflKftsoN,  I 

•/..  xA  ie^ 

COUNTY  SURVEYOR.  /[ 

Ux>(jci;£^S: 


^  r  .fe 


/:.  “ . ~  . 

tab  ^L^Lr<b^^  ; 

Mbit# 

12.  vJuJb*. 


-i~'t%  LOajJ 


CO— e.  - 

mJL--  K^r^:..  e 


^  <-  ^ 


-<C&~ 


,N 

C-*<cS  yC*<{ 

CT1  ^ 

1 '*/'''  l— ^  •^-^Z  xF-i— e. 

~V^ 

,£3S*-wV  ^~W'  ^  J?  ^^7  , 

^4K^-*oi  ^6,  .52*w/  <C*>  /t^LsCsC^. 

S^-0  ■£2^2'  tL*Z&{j  ^Zz*(  <T> 

^ £?  ^'a-^f/(  ^^uCC^-iM'  &**+**/  /<T~ 

C2^-  ^  J  <£2*£*~s-- ^p/  <$***.  y^-w  st- 

/&C  p? ^  p*sLi^. 

^yf~  a>  ^t^Lp,  ^ ^  p  <?  c?/^f 

-*V  S^-ZS  .  ^  ^o-^Ul  /2^U/  <{pf  4 

Z?  <51m.<(  /z-~-i  — ^~ZY<^Z~~y  /(£vljZzpL^  p£J-<s  /£~ 

'*K<*~*~  .  /?<  zz-*-^  A**  *=>^>  ^  /^-v  s&a*sts  S^Z. 

-g  <=^S'.  /Zf^stCx  e^  ^cy^ZU  ^ 

^  <C^*y4^  <z*6*-Z~->  /^r  /£$  s^Z* 

^  <ZL*^t>(  ZLa^  <Z&S<7{  y^.<y>~  s*£is,/  d£&*~^ 


)oflflUDSOrl, 


COUNTY  SURVEYOR. 


<7^  0/~~s  /l^  /Z^A  0^<^\  S' 

<^2lA  2t*-<S  S-O  *-? 


eL^/~  ^/Zvxsf  /&$/  . 

^  <y..»\  ef  y  ^ ** — f  ^ 

^7*^0  ^  ^f~  £2^4  O/'  £04'  y&~  £3-^o  <=p, 

^yZ?  ^ .  f_  -  o-<^  J^e*'  i  S^-**—**^  , 

— z*-*^  ,22{f  tfZ^OZZlo-^  sZ?Z^-0  s^*-€s, 

,  £3**.  M.  (£2-r&*M^.‘zS 

<>^  ,£&  &**#(  £^^C4^n  ^  o^-<  ^£r  ^ZuS- 


t^2u  ^  CZ^<  a^/9  y  (s^  /£xlx&  <^i  ^  £-*£  S**~*--d  ct££  s* 

« «s/  a^4-^-^/~  /iY~  ZZtZcf  /*  ■ 


/Zsi^a.  C. 


ov/  *4  , 


'<r 


ls^2^as£csL^.a/  (  ^_-^/ 


/**§ 

OVER  $600,000,00  PAID  TO  BENEFICIARIES, 


^(o/tcayo, 


Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edis< 


Dear  Sir:— —I  notice  by  an  article  in  recent  papers  that 
you  have  invented  a  method  of  separating  gold  from  dry  placer 
ground.  As  I  understand  it,  it  is  an  electrical  process  which  will 
take  the  place  of  the  old  sluice  boxes  in  washing.  This  will  I  am 
sure,  describe  to  you  what  T  refer  to,  and  I  should  be  very  glad  to 
have  you  write  me  as  to  the  earliest  date  at  which  you  will  be  able 
to  erect  a  plant  of  that  kind,  what  the  cost  would  be,  as  to  the 
various  number  of  yards  capacity, and  also  what  the  capacity  would 


be.  In  fact  all  such  informat i< 


would  be  necessary  to  form  s 


telligent  idea  of  the  cost  of  a  plant  and  cost  of  separatu 
Kindly  write  me  at  your  earliest  convenience.  I  ei 


Very  truly  yours, 


Iff  ~ 


Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison, 

Orange,  N.  J. 

Dear  'Sir:- 

I  beg  to  acknowledge  receipt  of  your  favor  of  the  15th 
instant,  and  am  very  much  pleased  to  know  that  you .have  gotten  the  iron 
below  seven  per  cent>. ,  in  the  Leadville  zinc  ore. 

As  to  the  various  metallic  contents  of  the  ores  with  which  you 
have  been  experimenting.  After  the  zinc  has  been ’ extracted  therefrom, 
the  lead,  silver,  gold  and  iron  would  go  to  the  Colorado  smelters  and  be 
paid  for  according  to  the  values  contained  therein.  For  your  infor¬ 
mation,  would  state  the  lead  smelter  in  Colorado,  Omaha  and  Kansas  City 
alone  consume  more  than  one  thousand  tons  per  day  of  iron  for  fluxing 
purposes,  and  the  iron  in  the  Leadville  zinc  ores  is  valuable  for- this 
purpose. 

As  to  the  rock  sent  you.  This  is  crude  ore  as  it  comes  from 

the  mines  at  Leadville.  Some  of  this  ore  has  been  going  to  Swansea 

f. 

and  Belgium,  the  mines  at  Leadville  receiving  five  dollars  per  ton  flat 
on  board  cars  at  Leadville.  Had  not  this  zinc  ore  contained  so  much 
iron,  which  you  know  is  very  injurious  for  making  spelter,  they  would 
have  received  a  much  larger  price.  Some  of  this  ore  goes  to  the 
smelters  in  Colorado,  who  pay  for  the  lead,  silver,  gold  and  iron,  but 
put  a  penalty  on  the  zinc  contained  therein,  as  they  arenot  able  to  save 
the  zinc,  it  passing  away  in  the  slags  and  thrown  over  the  dump. 

You  are  correct  when  you  say  the  quartz  and  silicious  gangue 


-2- 

in  the  ore  is  thrown  away. 

I  note  with  considerable  Interest  that  you  can  makea  high  grade 
zinc  concentrate,  low  in  iron,  and  if  done  on  a  large  scale,  say,  one 
thousand  or  more  tons  per  day,  it  can  be  done  cheaply.  Several  of  the 
mines  in  Lsadville  are  concentrating  their  zinc  ore  by  stamps,  crushers, 
gigs  and  thence  over  Wilfley  concentration  tables,  and  are  able  by  this 
process  to  run  up  their  zinc,  reducing  the  iron  in  the  ore  to  about  10 
per  cent.,  minimum,  shipping  the  lead  and  iron  to  the  smelters  and  the 
zinc  concentrates  to  Swansea,  Wales,  and  Belgium.  Quite  a  considerable 
tonnage  of  tailings  are  being  shipped  from  leadville  to  Mineral  Point, 
Wisconsin,  which  are  being  treated  by  zinc  works  at  that  place. 

I  have  no  hesitancy  in  saying  if  you  can  reduce  the  iron  in  the 
Leadville  zinc  ores  below  seven  per  cent.,  saving  the  lead  and  iron 
which  carries  the  silver  and  gold  as  a  bi-product,  we  can  make  a  large 
amount  of  money  out  of  the  process. 

I  am  also  glad  to  note  you  have  no  difficulty  in  making  the 
separation  of  the  zinc  iron  tailings.  This  has  been  a  difficult  matter 
to  do,  and  the  large  zinc  mines  in  Colorado  have  been  experimenting,  not 
only  here,  but  throughout  the  country,  with  some  cheap  process  which 
would  make  this  separation. 

If  you  desire  any  more  of  the  Leadville  ores  for  your  tests, 
kindly  advise  me  and  I  will  have  some  sent  promptly  by  express  to  you  at 
Orange . 

Yours  truly, 

try  f-Ajrvf<  - 


THE  EDISON  DRY  PLACER  PROCESS 

For  the  Separation  of  Gold  from  Gravel  Without 
the  Use  of  Water. 


purpose  T  ‘  S  process  has  becn  ‘"vented  and  perfected  by  Thomas  A.  Edison  expressly  for  the  pur- 
■  pose  of  saving  the  gold  in  those  localities  where  water  cannot  be  had  in  sufficient  quantity 
to  permit  of  hydraulic  or  other  wet  methods  of  concentration.  Its  field  of  usefulness  however  is  not  limited 
to  the  separation  of  gold  from  gravel.  Mauy  other  classes  of  material  may  be  concentrated  successfully 


Kl  N  D  OF  The  daSS  °f  grave,s  most  casi'y  and  efficiently  treated  by  this  process  are  those  in  which  the 

GRAVEL  gold  occurs  in  small  grains  in  dry.  loose  or  uncemented  gravel,  where  the  gold  is  free,  and 

TREATED.  ”°t  imbedded  in  or  attached  to  the  gangue,  and  is  not  extremely  fine,  as  flour  or  float  gold 
nor  extremely  coarse,  as  pound  nuggets.  In  other  words  the  process  is  designed  to  suit  the 
great  majority  of  placers  where  the  gold  occurs  as  grains  varying  in  size  from  fine  colors  to  half  inch 
nuggets.  Gravel  too  firmly  cemented  together  to  permit  of  its  being  screened  would  require  mechanical 
disintegration  before  treatment,  or  if  too  damp  for  screening  it  would  have  to  be  dried.  Gravel  containing 
black  sand  is  very  successfully  treated  and  the  magnetite  removed  as  a  by-product  by  the  use  of  Mr.  Edison’s 
Magnetic  Separator.  Very  stony  gravel  is  the  more  easily  treated  by  this  process  because  the  stones  may 
be  readily  removed  by  grizzlies  and  left  on  the  spot  leaving  only  a  small  portion  of  the  total  gravel  contain- 
ing  the  gold  to  be  taken  to  the  mill  for  separation. 


essential  steps  or  stages  in  the  operation  of  the  process :  First,  the  sizing  of 


the  gravel  or  dividing  it  by  means  of  Mr.  Edisoi 
ately  graded  sizes ;  and  second,  the  concentration  of  each  of  the: 
instead  of  a  stream  of  water. 


SIZING  TheEdison  Sizing  method  has  a  very  large  capacity  combined  with  high  efficiency.  These 
screens  carry  3,000  pounds  per  hour  for  every  foot  of  width  and  have  many  times  the  efficiency 
of  the  screens  usually  employed.  They  are  stationary  and  have  no  moving  parts  except  the  feeding  device 
a  revolving  roller.  ’ 


SEPARATION  Edif 1 “  Dry  SeParatOT  depends  for  its  operation  upon  the  fact  that  if  two 

bodies  of  equal  size,  but  of  different  weights,  are  allowed  to  fall  through  a  blast  of  air 
the  lighter  body  will  be  carried  farther  by  the  blast  than  the  heavier  one.  But  in  order  to  get  results  that 
are  commercially  practical  very  constant  conditions  must  be  easily  maintained,  and  to  successfully  bring 
about  and  maintain  these  conditions  was  the  great  obstacle  to  be  overcome  in  the  development  of  the  pro¬ 
cess.  For  instance,  the  blast  must  be  constant  and  of  equal  velocity  at  all  points,  free  from  puffs  and  no 
stronger  in  its  middle  than  on  the  sides  where  the  walls  of  the  chamber  or  duct  through  which  it  passes 
tend  to  retard  it.  This  separator  has  only  two  moving  parts,  a  centrifugal  fan  and  a  slowly  revolving 
roller  feed.  It  is  of  very  inexpensive  sheet  iron  construction,  and  may  be  built  in  any  machine  shop  It 
has  no  complicated  parts  and  only  four  bearings  to  be  lubricated. 

VARIATION  OF  ^lthouEh  the.wllole  process. is  simplicity  itself,  yet  it  is  capable  of  considerable  varia- 
PROCESS  TO  l!011 10  adapt  11  t0  the  particular  needs  of  the  gravel  to  be  treated.  The  number  of 
SUIT  GRAVEL.  slzes  ,,lto  wlucl‘ tIle  gravel  is  first  divided  depends  upon  the  size  and  condition  of  the 
gold  to  be  saved.  The  capacity  and  some  of  the  details  of  the  separator  also  depend 
upon  the  gravel  and  the  gold.  The  maximum  size  of  gravel  to  be  treated  in  the  mill  is  determined  by  th» 
size  of  the  coarsest  gold,  everything  larger  than  this  being  screened  out  as  the  material  is  excavated  at 
left  where  excavated. 


Fy  In  order  to  discover  the  characteristics  of  the  gravel  and  of  the  gold  and  to  thor- 

TRIALOF  THE  oughly  adaPt  the  process  to  the  material,  it  is  our  policy  in  aU  cases  to  first  operate 

GRAVEL.  tlle  Process  on  a  small  scale  upon  the  placer  to  be  worked,  running  through  it  gravel 

taken  from  test  pits  distributed  over  the  deposit.  Careful  records  are  kept  of  all 
runs,  and  these  show  not  only  the  peculiarities  of  the  material  and  the  cheapest  and  most  efficient  method 
of  treating  it,  but  the  extent  and  value  of  the  deposit  and  the  percentage  of  saving  to  be  expected  of  the 
large  plant.  It  also  affords  an  opportunity  of  demonstrating  to  the  owners  the  ability  of  the  process  to 
successfully,  efficiently  and  cheaply  treat  their  property. 

EXPERIMENTAL  The  aPParatus  required  for  this  preliminary  experimental  operation  would  consist 
APPARATUS  chiefly  of  a  set  of  sizing  screens  and  a  separator.  These  will  be  furnished  by  Mr. 

Edison  and  remain  his  property.  The  other  necessary  items,  and  all  other  expenses, 
such  as  bins,  building,  gasoline,  steam  or  other  form  of  eugine  to  furnish  motive  power,  labor,  teams,  &c., 
would  be  furnished  by  the  owners. 


After  completing  the  preliminary  work  the  design  and  construction  of  the  final  plant  would  pro- 
PLANT  ceed  under  the  Persollal  direction  of  Mr.  Edison,  who  would  also  act  as  consulting  engineer  to 
the  company.  The  size  or  capacity  of  the  plant  would  depend  largely  upon  the  value  per  cubic 
yard  of  the  gravel  as  well  as  the  extent  or  contents  of  the  deposit.  A  placer  averaging  30  cents  per  cubic 
yard  of  gravel  “in  place  ”  may  be  profitably  worked  in  a  plant  having  a  capacity  of  about  2,000  yards  per 


1899.  Motion  Pictures  (D-99-15) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to 
the  production  and  commercial  development  of  motion  picture  films.  Most  of 
the  items  concern  the  Klondike  Exposition  Co.,  which  was  organized  by 
Edison  and  Thomas  Crahan  to  make  a  filming  expedition  to  the  Yukon  in 
order  to  produce  films  suitable  for  display  at  the  Paris  Exposition  of  1900. 
Included  is  correspondence  between  Crahan  and  William  E.  Gilmore, 
general  manager  of  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Co. 


All  of  the  documents  have  been  selected  except  for  duplicates. 
Related  material  can  be  found  in  D-99-17  (Phonograph  -  General). 


Dawson  City,  Yukon  Territory', 
January  27th,  1899. 


TO  WHOM  IT  MAY  CONCERN:  Mr.  THOMAS 

CRAHAH  is  the  Agent  and  Business  Manager  of  the  Syndicate 
composed  of  the  undersigned  who  have  organized  a  Company 
known  as  the  "Klondike  Exposition  Company,"  the  pruposes 
of  which  are  to  make  exhibits  of  products,  relics,  station¬ 
ary  and  moving  pictures  of  the  North  West,  including  the 
Yukon  Territory,  at  Paris,  in  1900. 


Manager  Canadian  Bank  of  Commerce 

- - - 

Ife^ger  Alaska  Commercial  Company. 

,,  -  ^  J! 

Manager  No r th-Aiaerican  Transportation 
and  Trading  Company 

Wholesale  Merchant 


Counsellor  at  law,  etc. 


Miner  and  Merchant..; 


a  ,  &rcun.az,  ?l, 

p  OAJZL.  ^ 

ir  * 


THIS  AGREEMENT  made  at 

day  of  March  in  tl 
ninety-nine  between  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  on  the  one  part, 
(hereinafter  designated  as  Mr,  Edison),  and  THOMAS  CRAHAN, 
(hereinafter  designated  as  Mr.  Crahan. ) 

II  TNESSETH: 

WHEREAS  Mr.  Crahan  or  his  assigns  proposes 
to  take  and  obtain  pictures  and  representations  by 


is  year  One  thousand  eight  hundred  and 


photographic  process  of  places  and  scenes  in  the  region 
knov/n  as  the  Klondike  country  and  elsewhere  in  Alaska,  in 
the  North  West  Territory  of  Canada,  and  of  places  and 
scenes  elsev/here  from  and  to  Seattle  into  such  country,  ■ 
all  of  which  is  hereinafter  designated  as  the  Territory, 
and  intends  that  such  pictures  and  representations  shall 
be  fitted  and  prepared  for  first  cl'ass  exhibition  as  moving 
pictures  by  the  process  and'  manner  knovn  as  the  projecting 
Kinetescope  or  similar  apparatus,  and  intends  to  exhibit  the 
same'  particularly  at  the  Paris  Exposition  of  1900  and 
elsev/here  in  Prance,  and  in  England,  the  United  States, 
Canada,  and  elsev/here;  No vr  therefore  to  carry  out  such  ■ 
proposition  and  intention  and  in  consideration  of  mutual 
promises  and  the  payment  of  the  moneys  he  rein  Eft  er  provided 
for,  it  is  agreed  as  fdllows: 

That  on  or  before  the  15th  day  of  May  1899 
Mr.  Edison  shall  manufacture,  provide  and  furnish  two 


complete  Kinetograplis  or  photographic  apparatus  or  machines 
of  the  first  class  capable  of  : taking  and  obtaining  such 
pictures  or  the  negatives  of  such  pictures  or  scenes  and 
for  the  purpose  aforesaid,  such  negatives  to  be  of  at  least 
three  inches  in  width  inside  measurement.  The  photographic 
apparatus  or  machines  shall  continue  and  remain  the  property  ! 
of  Mr,  Edison,  but  the  exclusive  right  t  o  the  us  e  cf  the  same 
for.  the  purposes  aforesaid,  or  of  any  substitute  of  such 
machines,  shall  belong  to  Mr.  Crahan  for  the  period  of  five 
years  from  the  date  of  this  contract.  As  compensation  to 
Mr.  Edison  for  the  gurnisliing  of  such  machines  and  their 
use  as  aforesaid  Mr.  Crahan  will  pay  him  the  cost,  said  cost 
not  to  exceed  One  thousand  dollars  for  both,  of  which  Tvro 
hundred  dollars  shall  be  paid  upon  the  execution  of  this 
contract',  the  receipt  of  which  is  hereby  acknowledged,  ’ 
and  Eight  hundred  dollars  on  July  1st  1899  by  bank  draft 
on  New  York  City,  New  York,  if  Mr.  Edison  has  then  faithfully 
performed  his  agreement  as  to  such  machines. 

Together  with  .such  machine  or  machines  and 
thereafter  frcrn  time  to  time  during  the*  period  of  this 
contract  as  shall  be  required  by  Mr.  Crahan,  Mr.  Edison  ! 

shall  have  prepared  and  furnished  proper  and  suitable  ’  y 
negative  films  for  use  in  such  machines  and  for  the  taking  '• 
and  obtaining  of  such  pictures  as  aforesaid,  and  shall  j 

thereafter  within  reasonable  time  develop  or  cause  to  be 
developed  and  prepared  such  negative  films  in  final  shape 
ready  for  use  and  for  the  proper  making  of  positives  to 

(2) 


3 


be  used  for  exhibition  in  the  manner  proposed  as  aforesaid; 
and  for  such  negative  films  and  for  the  final  preparation 
of  the  same  Mr.  Crahan  will  pay  Mr.  Edison  the  actual 
cost  of  such  films  together  with  the  cost  of  their  final 
preparation  in  all  not  to  exceed  thirty  cents  per  running 
foot  of  such  films;  and ' said  negatives  shall  be  paid  for 
one-thira  on  delivery  at  Mr.  Edison's  manufactory  at  West 
Orahge,  New  Jersey;  one-third  on  July  15th  1899  to 
Mr.  Edison's  agent  at  Dawson,  Yukon  Territory  by  bank 
draft  on  New  York  City,  New  York,  ana  one-third  on  complete 
development  of  the  same  ready  for  manufacture  of  positives 
therefrom;  and  also  to  furnish  such  positives  frem  the 
negative  films  as  nay  be  required  upon  the  written  order 
of  Mr.  Crahan  but  not  otherwise  at  a  price  not  to  exceed 
thirty  cents  per  ranning  foot  of  saia  films;  the  said 
positive  films  shall  be  paid  for  as  ordered  by  Mr.  Crahan 
ready  for  vise  in  such  projecting  na chines.  All  saia  films 
both  negative  and  positive  shall  be  the  property  of 
Mr.  Crahan. 

At  the  tiine  saia  photographic  apparatus  or  machines 
are  furnished  as  aforesaid  Mr.  Edison  shall  select  and 
appoint  a  proper  person  of  due  experience  and  shall 
thereafter  substitute  any  other  or  others  in  his  place 
fran  time  to  time  as  may  be  required,  who  during  the  season 
of  1899,  or  so  much  thereof  as  Mr.  Crahan  shall  deem 
necessary  to  obtain  pic  tures  in  said  territory,  shall  have 
charge  of  said  photographic  apparatus  and  machines;  and 


•under  the  direction  and  control  of  Mr.  Cralian  shall  take 
and  obtain  all  suchpictures  and  scenes  within  the  territory 
above  mentioned;  that  Mr.  Cralian  will  pay  such  person  or 
his  substitute  during  such  employment  at  the  rate  of 
Five  (<$5.00)  Dollars  per  day  ana  in  addition  thereto  his 
necessary  and  proper  expenses,  such  payment  to  be  made  as 
Mr.  Edison  shall  from  time  to  time  require. 

On  or  before  the  first  day  of  January  1900 
Mr.  Edison  will  manufacture,  furnish  and  deliver  a  proper 
Kinetescope  or  projection  machine,  and  on  three  months  notice 
others,  all  of  the  first  class  suitable  and  fitted  for  the 
projection  and  showing  of  such  pictures  and  scenes  in 
exhibition  and  which  shall  project  or  show  such  pictures  at 
the  best  focus  at  a  size  in  projection  of  not  less  than 
eighteen  feet  by  twenty  feet.  Such  projecting  machines 
shall  be  the  exclusive  property  cf  Mr.  Cralian  for  which 
he  shall  pay  to  Mr.  Edison  upon  delivery  the  cost  thereof  • 
not  to  exceed  Two  hundred  dollars  per  machine. 

If  by.  Occident  or  misadventure  not  due  to  the  fault 
or  negligence  of  Mr.  Crahan  either  or  any  of  such^iacHines 
shall  within  the  said  poriod  be  lost  or  destroyed,  or  so 
injured  as  to  become  useless  for  the  purposes  aforesaid, 
or  shall  be  or  become  ineffective  for  first  class  work  in 
the  particulars  aforesaid,  then  and  in  that  case  Mr.  Edison 
will,  with  all  reasonable  speed,  repair,  or  cause  to  be 
repaired,  such  machine  or  nu chine s  to  be  prut  in  first  class 
shape  and  effectiveness  without  cost  to  Mr.  Cralian;  or  in 
case  said  machine  or  machines  cannot  be  so  repaired  Mr. Edison 


(4) 


I 


■will  without  cost  furnish  and  substitute  another  or  other 
machines  in  place  thereof;  the  intention  of  the  parties 
being  that  at  all  times  during  the  above  mentioned  period 
Mr.  Edison  will  be  obligated,  except  by  default  or  negli¬ 
gence  of  Mr.  Crahan,  to  furnish  and  keep  in  order  and 
effectiveness  such  machines  or  furnish  proper  substitutes 
therefor. 

It  is  further  agreed  that  except  as  hereinafter 
provided  neither  Mr.  Edison  nor  any  of  the  Companies  with 
which  he  is  connected,  nor  any  employee  of  his  or  them, 
shall  knowingly  make  or  furnish  any  similar  photographic 
apparatus  for  similar  use  and  purposes  in  the  above 
mentioned  territory  or  for  representing  or  showing  scenes 
in  such  territory. 

And  as  further  consideration  going  to  this  entire 
contract  it  is  agreed  that  Mr.  Edison  shall  receive  and  be 
entitled  to  20$  of  the  net  receipts  derived  from  the 
exhibition  of  such  pictures  or  scones. 

During  the  said  undertaking  and  the  taking  and  : 
obtaining  such  pictures  Mr.  Edison  shall  be  entitled, 
within  said  territory  by  apparatus  and  appliances  and  films 
provided  at  his  own  cost,  and  by  and  through  the  person  or 
persons  so  selected  as  aforesaid,  to  take  and  obtain  all 
such  pictures  and  scenes  as  he  shall  see  fit  for  use  in 
Kinetescopes'  of  the  kind  and  size  heretofore  used  by 
Mr.  Edison  in  slot  machines  and  otherwise  in  pro  Sections. 
That  the  negatives  and  positives  of  pictures  and  scenes 
so  taken  shall  belong  to  Mr.  Edison  and  under  his  direction 


and  control  may  be  exhibited  in  the  United  States  and  in 
Europe  in  slot  machines  or  otherv/ise;  that  the  net  receipts 
of  stich  exhibiting  shall  be  equally  divided  between  Mr. Edison 
and  Mr.  Crahan.  jt  is  however  understood  that  such  pictures 
shall  not  be  exhibited  at  any  time  or  in  any  place  until  the 
exhibition  of  the  pictures  first  above  mentioned  lias  begun 
in  Paris. 

All  provisions  of  this  contract  shall  be  and 
become  for  the  benefit  as  well  of  the  parties  hereto  as 
for  their  respective  executors,  administrators  and  assigns, 
and  that  Mr.  Crahan  may  assign  this  contract  and  all  his 
rights  thereunder  and  that  his  assignee  or  assignees  shall 
be  entitled  to  all  the  rights  arid  privileges  heroin  given 
and  be  obligated  by  all  his  obligations. 

Mr.  Crahan  agrees  that  he  will  at  once  organise 
a  corporation  under  the  lav/s  of  New  Jersey,  to  which  this 
contract  shall  be  assigned,  which  corporation  shall  stand 
in  the  place  of  Mr.  Crahan  as  to  all  rights  and  obligations 
of  this  contract. 


^  A\  \ 

\  '  t-4£  <£/  y/£&  Sfa'ect'. 

■AQ^e^y^-Jk^^-S^^r/^— 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq. 


At  the  request  of  Mr.  Thomas  Crahan  I  enclosi 


;ith  a  certificate  for  < 


i  of  the  capital  stock  of  the 


Klondike  Exposition- Company,  qualifying  you  as  a  dire ct o: 

Yours  very  truly. 


/5-t.t  X 


jf..  t+<U  ^  ^  ~ 


Klondike  Exposition  Co. 


Butler  House,  Beattie,  Wash. 

Dear  Sirs  \ 

X  desire  to  ao knowledge  with  thanks  receipt  of  sigAt  draft 
for  $700.00,  dated  Hew  York,  June  7th,  1899,  payable  to  Thomas  A. 

Edison,  on  the  Canadian  Bank  of  Commerce,  Dawson,  Yukon  Territory, 
which  we  have  put  through  for  collection  and  immediately  we  have  re¬ 
ceived  returns  from  same  the  amount  will  be  credited  to  your  account. 

You  of  course  understand  that  the  account  open  on  our, i  books  at  the  . 

present  time  is  in  the  name  of  Tftomas  Crahan,  as  we  h^vo  not  received 
any  authority  from  you  that  the  contract  rights  ,f|ave  £>een  turned  over 
to  the  Klondike  Exposition  Co.  ' 

Trusting  that  everything  is  going  well  with  you  ajjkl  that  the  results 
will  be  in  every  way  satisfactory  to  all  interested  parties,  believe  me, 

Yours  very  truly,  ! 


General  Manager, 


THOMAS  CRAHAN, 


Tl?e  Klondike  ©position  @mpan^. 


DIRECTORS. 

Thomas  A.  Edison,  Orange,  N. 
H.  T.  Wills,  Dawson,  Y.  T. 
Ely  E.  Weare,  Chicago,  III. 

J.  E.  Hansen,  Dawson,  Y.  T. 
Samuel  Word,  Dawson,  Y.  T. 
Tlios,  Craiian,  Dawson,  Y.  T. 
Thos.  Adair,  Dawson,  Y,  T. 


PARIS— 1900. 

Dawson ,  yp 


f'Ric  Eti 


,  !■'/'£  O'; 

I  mnmswm  i 


W.E. Gilmore  Esq., General  Manager., 

Edison  Mfg  Co., 

Orange, N.J.  '  ? 

I)“ar  Sir: 

Yours  in  acknowledgement  of  the  receipt  of  my  draft, came  to  hand 
to  day .All  my  rights  in  the  contract  with  Mr  Edison, have  been  assigned  to 
the  Klondike  Exposition  Co, as  that  was  understood  by  Mr  Edison  and  my¬ 
self  when  the  contract  was  made, and  was  one  of  the  conditions  upon  which 
it  was  based  .We  start  tomorrow  for  the  North, and  hope  we  may  find  you 
all  in  good  health  upon  our  re turn  .Regards  to  Mr  Edison  and  Mr  White. 

Yours  Very  Truly 


"A*M»nager. 


Samut/GA/mcnrt 
finuA  Zfflytn 


z/..  v,..v.wn;^  , 


'Mvr  'for/1.  Sept*  23,  1899 


i  E.  Gilmore,  Esq., 

Edison  Manfg.  Co., 

Orange,  N.J. 


WfO0VE:Q 

SEP,«8M  . 

juitAhkl 


We  beg  to  enclose  herewith  original  assignment  from 
Messrs.  Hollaman  and  Eaves  of  copyright  covering  the  Passion 
Play,  Salmi-Morse  Version,  the  same  having  been  recorded  in 
the  Office  of  the  Librarian  of  Congress.  Kindly  acknowledge 


[ENCLOSURE] 


ALBERT  G, 
HOLLAMAN, 


EAVES  and  RICHARD  G, 


THOMAS  A.  EDISON, 


ASSIGNMENT  OP  COPYRIGHT, 


Dyer, Edmonds  £  Dyj 


[ENCLOSURE] 


THIS  INDENTURE  made  this  / J  »  day  of  July,  1899. 
between  ALBERT  G.  EAVES  and  RICHARD  G.  HOLLAMAN,  both  of  New 
York  in  the  County  and  State  of  New  York,  of  the  first  part, 
and  THOMAS  A,  EDISON,  of  Llewellyn  Park,  in  the  State  of  New 
Jersey,  of  the  second  part,  WITNESSETH: 

WHEREAS,  the  said  Albert  G.  Eaves  and  Richard  G. 
[Hollaman  are  proprietors  of  certain  photographic  films  en¬ 
titled  "The  Passion  Play",  for  use  on  a  moving  picture  ma¬ 
chine,  for  which  they  obtained  a  copyright  on  the  21st  day 
of  January,  1898;  and 

WHEREAS,  said  Thomas  A.  Edison  is  desirous  of  ac¬ 
quiring;  said  copyright; 

NOW  THIS  INDENTURE  WITNESSETH  that  the  said  Albert 
G.  Eaves  and  Richard  G.  Hollaman,  for  and  in  consideration 
of  the  sum  of  One  Dollar,  to  them  in  hand  paid  by  the  said 
Thomas  A.  Edison,  receipt  whereof  is  hereby  acknowledged, 
have  bargained,  sold  and  assigned,  and  by  these  presents  do 
bargain,  sell  and  assign,  unto  the  said  Thomas  A.  Edison, 
all  of  said  photograph  and  all  copyright,  title,  interest, 
property,  claim  and  demand,  of,  in  and  to  the  same;  TO  HAVE 
AND  TO  HOLD  the  said  photograph, copyright  and  all  the  prof¬ 
it,  benefit  and  advantage  that  shall  or  may  arise  by  and 
from  printing,  reprinting,  publishing  and  vending  the.  same 
or  in  any  other  manner  whatsoever,  unto  the  said  Thomas  A. 

Edison,^  his  heirs,  executors,  administrators  andr assigns . 

[forever. 

IN  WITNESS  WHEREOF,  the  said  parties  of  the  first 
’art  have  hereunto  set  their  hands  and  seals,  the  day  and 
rear  first  above  written. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


State  of  New  York, 

County  of  New  York. 

On  this  /y  ''  day  of  July,  1899,  before  me,  a  Notary 
Public,  personally  appeared  Albert  G.  Eaves  and  Richard  G. 
Hollaman,  to  me  known  and  known  to  me  to  be  the  persons 
described  in  and  who  executed  the  foregoing  assignment, 
and  severally  acknowledged  to  me  that  they  executed  the 
same  as  their  free  act  and  deed  for  the  uses  and  purposes 
therein  mentioned. 


Library  of  Congress. 

//ai/itnyton,  /£$.  ® 

folcpotny  (Ui/ynment  ccfiyttyrft  fcntiy  Q'\/Po. _ ,  of 

u  t/lt4  (/ay  iecoi(/c/  vn  l/c  SStflaUan  of  */3onyle46, 

/“y*  &-J-&L.  in  confolmity  totti  tie  fmve  of  tic  fyfiutcti  dftatci  ici/iectiny 
co/iyliy/tt.  of/1  uiitneu  m/telcof  tie  icaf o/ tie  SFtilau'a  ™ 


titi _ i/xAA^rr 


'je  rfai  rfccn  (tcleto 


M  /&JJ4. 


AMERICAN  SCENIC  COMPANY 


135  FIFTH  AVENUE 


Controlling  tljc  latest  improbco  apparatus 
for  retorting  airt  rrproBucing  mob* 
trig  pictures  inbenteD  bp 
tEIjomos  3.  CBDtSott 

'bxcVuwsv  oKe.  'itvuiea 

^W“«vo*C.  vx^  ^vAVou> 

IVicA  ?0\  >Vfip\oAuCitU^  TOWV-^  ^vetuneA 
aiuV  CVAC.  o\v  C^AOJAcVwxarv^  Vl\TV^V\OV€rt\\.OT\\“' 

vn  fc  cvn*~ o*f  CWiwataV  ^u\oiyuv.\^u^ . 


New  York). 


1899.  Patents  (D-99-16) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to 
foreign  and  domestic  patent  applications,  patent  litigation,  and  other  patent 
matters.  Most  of  the  material  consists  of  letters  to  Edison  from  the  law  firm  of 
Dyer,  Edmonds  &  Dyer  pertaining  to  phonograph  patents  and  patent 
infringements. 

Approximately  15  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  The 
following  items  have  not  been  selected:  non-substantive  correspondence  about 
application  fees  or  patent  renewals,  letters  of  transmittal,  and  documents  that 
duplicate  information  in  selected  items. 


IfW'-*  Ccf-  • 


9?icAam 'Jffiyrr. 
Samt/c/ 'G/Fttmotu/s. 


///ycr,  Cjf//suvtf/i 


C-rS/,„>  '#,«•/.  April  13,  1899, 


John  F.  Randolph,  Esq., 

Edison  Laboratory, 

Orange,  N.J. 

Dear  Sir,- 

We  beg  to  enclose  papers  in  referenpe^to  the  institution 
of  public  use  proceedings  in  connection  yfth  the  Concert  Phono¬ 
graph,  consisting,  first,  of  the  petition  to  the  Commissioner, 
and  second,  of  affidavits  of  Mr.  Ed*£on,  Mr.  Miller,  Mr.  Wurth, 
Mr.  Gilmore,  and  Mr.  John  F.  Ott.^/  The  petition  is  to  be  signed 
by  Mr.  Mallory  as  president  of  /he  National  Phonograph  Company, 
and  is  to  be  acknowledged  before  you.  The  affidavits  are  to 
be  signed  and  acknowledged  $r  the  several  gentlemen.  Regarding 
Mr.  Edison's  affidavit,  ireHiave  curtailed  it  as  much  as  possible, 
and  have  drawn  it  as  clo/ely  as  possible  on  the  lines  suggested 
by  him  yesterday  in  th/ interview  with  our  Mr.  Frank  L.  Dyer. 

/When  the  papers  have/been  signed,  please  return  them  to  us  for 
^filing  in  Washingt^ 

Yours  very  truly. 


(F.L.D.) 


(Enclosures) 


fUrr>-0  <*  ^*vWJ*T 


Ronograph  situation)  our 

ation  for  the  institution 
xaminer  yesterday,  and  re¬ 
hat  a  recommendation  would 
ose  proceedings  Instituted, 
finitely  brought  out  that 
arge  number  of  persons  since 
hine  sent  to  Washington, 
r  of  the  machine's  becoming 
ent  to  Washington  at  the 
ting  of  testimony,  and  for- 
sr  the  taking  of  testimony, 
should  be  also  stated  in 
ired  an  additional  affida- 
please  execute  and  return 

ruly, 

- $ 

. 

(Enclosure) 


Pt-rKo 


C  u/ss/wu/j  P\X2-yt:/\' 

■  fyJnJy.- @„/j,J<ferM 

'  3/;A'‘rM,rr,.yyee/,.  . 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 
Orange , 

N.J. 


Dear  Mr.  Edison,- 


:fo 


With  regard  to  the  public  use  proceedings  on  high 
surface  speed  for  talking  machines,  as  I  told  you  yesterday,  we  J 
will  want  to  take  your  deposition  on  Monday,  September  4th,  at  .  j 

your  laboratory.  I  will  see  you  during  the  week  preceding  \ ^ ^  \ 


that  day.  I  think  it  well  that  you  should  delegate 
to  attend  to  the  following  matters: 

1.-  Procure  a  modern  gramophone  and  ascejJ 
speed.  £0_  6//a."6utorffc^ 


•n 

■  /U  M4I, 


2.-  As  far  as  possible,  ascertain  the  limits  of  speed  varia¬ 
tion  which  the  user  of  the  phonograph  could  secure  by  the 
ordinary  speed  adjustment  with  which  the  machines  were 
provided  in  the  case  of  all  the  styles  of  phonographs  you 
have  marketed  since  you  began  to  use  wax  blanks. 

S.-  As  far  as  possible,  ascertain  the  lengths  and  diameters 
of  the  cylinders  for  all  the  different  styles  of  tinfoil 
phonographs  which  were  marketed  prior  to,  say,  1885. 

-  I  recall  that  you  made  one  of  the  disk  tinfoil  machines 
supplied  with  a  spring  motor  such  as  is  shown  in  your 
1878  English  patent.  That  machine  I  understand  is  still 
about  your  laboratory.  If  that,  or  any  other  motor  tin- 


foil  phonograph,  is  in  existence,  kindly  have  similar 
measurements  made. 

5.-  So  far  as  practicable,  ascertain  the  variations  in  speed 
capable  of  being  produced  by  users  with  the  ordinary 
means  of  adjustment  in  the  case  of  all  the  different 
styles  of  graphophones  which  have  been  marketed. 

The  securing  of  the  foregoing  information  will  enable  you  to  tes¬ 
tify  with  definiteness.  We  should  have  as  much  of  this  informa¬ 
tion  as  it  is  possible  to  obtain  before  September  4th.  1  would 


rather  you  would  put  a  man  on  this  work,  but  if  you  haven’t  any¬ 
body,  we  can  put  on  a  man  from  our  office. 


(R.N.D.) 

P.S.- —  Please  let  me  know  at  once  whether  you  will  put  a  man 
on  this  work. 


Dear  Sir,- 

We  beg  to  enclose  the  specification  in  the  rough  on  the 
improved  bricking  process,  which  you  will  please  execute  as  we 
have  indicated  in  lead  pencil.  We  think  you  will  find  the  de¬ 
scription  to  be  correct,  except  possibly  the  statement  on  page  5 
to  the  effect  that  the  composition  of  pulverized  material  and  the 
binder  may  be  baked  in  mass  and  afterwards  broken  up  as  you  de¬ 
scribe  in  your  patent  No,  465,251.  In  case  such  a  process  is 
impracticable  in  the  present  state  of  the  art,  we  will  erase 
this  statement  from  the  specification  before  the  case  is  filed. 

Yours  very  truly,  ■ 


[?(u  c^o- 


P'Ctfpcrs 

tZS&SU.  yU4.^4*GUJ&«M. 

/SW/S  /%«.  '"'  ,?/;A,rMtrt*  %  '£  Wfot. 

-tM"’  Sept.  9,  1899. 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 

Orange,  N.  J. 

Dear  Sir:- 

We  beg  to  enclose  the  application  papers  on  the  two 
improvements  in  phonographs  covering  the  employment  of  the 
new  reproducer  and  the  seventy-five  thread  per  inch  machine. 

If  the  papers  are  correct  and  meet  your,  views,  kindly  execute 
as  we  have  indicated.  We  attach  to  each  case  rough  pencil 
drawings,  from  which  the  Patent  Office  drawings  will  be  made. 

We  also  beg  to  enclose  blanks  for  patents  in  Germany, 
Austria,  Belgium  and  Prance,  which  you  will  please  execute 
with  your  fill  name  (Thomas  Alva  Edison) ,  as  we  have  indicated. 
The  British  patent  will  be  taken  out  as  a  communication  in  • 
the  usual  way. 


SmmteS &£t//nont/s\ 
/>n,i A 


,?y» 

.  7/r,v,,//y . 

. V/ .s\t/.iiir/r  . '//rtc/s. 

7M-,,/77,.r/>.  Sept.  13,  1899. 


"faiyp'VnrXj 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 
Orange , 


Dear  Sir,- 

We  beg  to  acknowledge  receipt  of  the  executed  papers  for 
U.S.  applications  on  the  new  reproducer  and  on  the  75-thread 
phonograph,  together  with  executed  powers  of  attorney  for  patents 
in  Germany,  Austria,  Belgium  and  France.  We  note  that  you  wish 
to  have  the  75-thread  phonograph  also  patented  in  France,  German® 
England  and  Austria.  So  far  as  England  and  France  are  concern¬ 
ed,  we  believe  there  will  be  no  difficulty  in  having  both  of  the 
inventions  covered  in  the  same  patents.  Austria  can  also  proba¬ 
bly  be  covered  in  this  way;  at  any  rate,  we  will  include  both 
devices  in  one  case,  and  can  make  a  division  later  on  if  it  is 
insisted  upon.  So  far  as  Germany  is  concerned,  we  believe  that 
a  separate  application  should  be  filed  on  the  75-thread  machine,, 
and  therefore  beg  to  enclose  an  additional  power  of  attorney  for 
this  purpose,  which  you  will  please  sign  as  we  have  indicated 
with  your  full  name. 


(F.L.D.) 

(Enclosure) 


-  ^o..tc*<3r 


Sat/ute/ £?£ttmcnt/s, 
/>rmA  Affiytn 


Q}y/:r;( u/mm'/uS)  ?■  Cfyy /:/•,' 

&},/„,/' dnAifii. 

'  .Y/JfoLte~t 

October  9,1899. 


SM'.  *Mr. 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 
Orange,  N.J. 
Dear  Sir:- 


We  beg  to  enclose  a  petition  for  filing  in  the  Can¬ 
adian  Patent  Office  in  connection  with  the  "Concert"  phono¬ 
graph  situation,  requesting  that  the  Office  delay  the  issue 
of  any  patent  either  to  Macdonald  or  Douglass  or  their  as¬ 
signees  until  the  public  use  question  has  been  settled  in 
this  country,  or  else  that  a  separate  public  use  proceeding 
be  instituted  in  Canada.  Please  sign  the  petition  in  the 
two  plaoes  on  page  8  as  we  have  indicated  in  leadpencil.  Mr. 
Mallory  is  also  to  sign  the  petition  on  page  8,  as  president 
of  the  National  Phonograph  Company,  and  is  to  sign  the  oath 
on  page  9.  The  oaths  of  both  yourself  and  Mr.  Mallory 
are  to  be  acknowledged  before  a  Notary  Public. 

Yours  very  truly, 


y  StfoLM-i.  ».*«* 

j  Z7.sm 

Xs/b^t/  !  / 

U(y  'AjtZ^ 

^ILc,  ^  zft+^-yC,  ■<****£-^^  zdr 


stt  £p.  &-t^j  ^C^yr 

iCu^-  *-c~, 


ft-  ^7 

th'iz^u^'  ft- 


u/jy/rv/rSi  '/'Qlyrr' 

.  CJ/„r/„//y  ,  Vi,/™/;  Affy  w///  '/jtrMJflf. 

1  "lirRsLaLf, 


November  14,  1899. 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 
Orange , 


Dear  Sir,- 

In  your  application  No.  9B7  for  Apparatus  for  Concen¬ 
trating  Magnetic  Iron  Ores,  the  Patent  Office  cites  as  a  refer¬ 
ence  the  description  in  the  Engineering  and  Mining  Journal  on 
"The  Mine  Hill  Ore  Deposits  in  New  Jersey  and  the  Wetherill 
Concentrating  Plant".  The  date  of  this  publication  is  July 
24,  1897.  We  beg  to  enclose  an  affidavit  antedating  this 
reference,  which  you  will  please  sign  and  return  to  us. 

Yours  very  truly. 


(P.L.D .) 
(Enclosure) 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 
Orange , 

N.J. 


Dear  Sir,- 

We  beg  to  enclose  herewith  original  Letters  Patent  is¬ 
sued  to  yourself  for  Improvements  in  Rolls,  No.  637,327,  dated 
November  21,  1899.  Kindly  acknowledge  receipt. 

Yours  very  truly, 

(A.G.R.) 

(Enclosure) 


s>!>$ 


•Aaiftjlfflyrr. 

mucte/Afmm. 

7,U/.®,/rr. 


( u/ss/YV/r/)  y  C/lyr/-, 

•  ///rr//r//y  :  !.~$r//y//i ,f»  {^}r//j//  //rrr/.Jt:j.  yt 

'M//'  November  £ 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 

Orange , 

N..T  . 

Dear  Sir,- 

We  have  prepared  the  application  papers  on  the  improved 
form  of  reheater,  and  beg  to  enclose  the  same  herewith.  We 
have  indicated  in  lead  pencil  how  the  papers  are  to  be  executed. 


(E.L.D.) 

(Enclosure) 


Yours  truly, 


Dear  Sir,- 


In  accordance  with  your  pencil  memoranda  handed  this 
morning  to  our  Mr.  Frank  L.  Dyer,  we  beg  to  say  that  your  case 
Ho.  751  issued  as  patent  Ho.  484,582  dated  October  18,  1892,  and 
that  your  case  Ho.  792  issued  as  patent  No.  499,879  dated  June 
20,  1893. 

In  reference  to  your  enquiry  if  your  patent  Ho.  392,419 
does  not  cover  the  process  of  duplicating  employed  by  Berliner 
in  the  making  of  gramophone  blanks,  we  beg  to  say  that  we  have 
not  been  able  to  locate  this  patent  by  the  number  which  you  give. 
We  will,  however,  run  through  the  several  patents  obtained  by  you 
on  duplicating  processes,  and  will  ascertain  if  there  is  any  pat¬ 
ent  which  would  be  probably  infringed  by  Berliner. 

In  reference  to  your  application  Ho.  749,  filed  January 
16,  1888,  for  electrical  switches,  it  appears  that  the  claims 
were  rejected  on  references  showing  the  employment  of  silver  for 
the  contact  surfaces  in  commutators  of  dynamos.  In  the  prosecu¬ 
tion  of  your  case,  the  argument  was  made  that  the  employment  of 
silver  in  the  construction  of  commutators  was  distinguished  from 
the  employment  of  silver  in  the  construction  of  a  switch.  That 
argument  was  considered  by  the  Patent  Office  as  being  insuffi- 
1 


cient  to  properly  overcome  the  references  and  the  case  was  final¬ 
ly  rejected.  You  advised  us  on  February  10,  1892,  to  allow  the 
application  to  become  abandoned.  Even  if  the  patent  had  issued, 
we  doubt  if  it  could  have  been  regarded  as  being  infringed  by  the 
construction  of  commutator  employed  in  the  Thomson  meter,  in  view 
of  the  references  showing  the  employment  of  silver  in  commutators 
of  dynamos.' 

With  regard  to  your  application  Ho.  743,  filed  January  5, 
1888,  Serial  No.  259,895,  on  process  of  duplicating  phonograms, 
we  find  that  as  originally  presented  there  were  claims  which 
covered  broadly  the  first  step  of  coating  a  phonogram  with  a 
metal,  and  there  were  other  claims  which  covered  the  specific 
process  of  coating  the  phonogram  with  a  metal  by  means  of  a 
vacuous  deposit.  A  prior  British  patent  granted  to  you  covered 
a  process  which  would  have  been  considered  the  equivalent  of  the 
broad  claims,  and  therefore,  in  order  .that  the  patent  as  a  whole 
when  issued  might  not  be  affected  by  the  fact  of  the  prior  British 
patent,  the  case  wa3  divided  and  your  application  No.  751  was 
filed  January  30,  1888,  which  issued  as  patent  No.  484,582  dated 
October  18,  1892,  containing  claims  which  are  limited  to  the 
vacuous  deposit.  This  division  was  made  in  accordance  with  the 
practice  as  it  existed  in  the  Office  at  the  time,  but  in  January 
1894  the  Supreme  Court,  in  the  case  of  Miller  vs.  Eagle  Mfg.  Oo., 
rendered  a  decision  which  would  have  made  a  patent  issued  on  the 
original  application  with  the  broad  claims  invalid  in  view  of  the 
patent  which  had  already  been  issued  with  the  specific  claims. 

We  therefore  found  it  necessary  to  abandon  the  case. 


In  reference  to  your  application  No.  744,  filed  January 
6,  1888,  Serial  No.  259,896,  we  find  that  the  claims  as  presented 
covered  broadly  the  duplicate  phonogram  "carrying  a  photographic 
record  and  constructed  of  a  hard  material  not  capable  of  beirg 
satisfactorily  indented  by  a  phonograph".  In  view  of  the  fact 
that  such  an  article  appeared  to  be  covered  in  your  British  pateit 
No.  1644  of  April  24,  1878,  which  patent  expired  while  the  appli¬ 
cation  in  question  was  pending,  a  valid  patent  could  not  have 
been  granted  on  the  application,  and  therefore  the  application 
was  abandoned.  Your  patent  No.  484,582  dated  October  18,  1892, 
above  considered,  which  describes  the  process  of  making  a  dupli¬ 
cate  phonogram  of  a  hard  material  and  which  refers  specifically 
to  such  a  phonogram,  would,  in  addition  to  your  British  patent 
already  referred  to,  make  it  impossible  to  obtain  a  valid  patent 
on  the  invention  in  case  the  application  were  refiled,  as  sug¬ 
gested  by  you. 

In  reference  to  your  application  No.  806,  filed  October 
11,  1888,  for  method  of  duplicating  phonograms.  Serial  No. 287, 842^ 
we  find  upon  an  examination  of  the  file  that  abandonment  of  this 
case  also  was  required  in  view  of  your  expired  British  patent 
above  referred  to.  We  find  from  the  memoranda  on  file,  the 
question  of  abandonment  was  discussed  with  you  on  February  18, 
1895,  and  that  the  abandonment  was  permitted  at  your  request. 

With  regard  to  your  application  No.  781,  we  find  from  an 
examination  of  our  files  that  this  case  was  abandoned  in  favor  of 
the  applications  which  were  issued  as  patents  No.  382,416  dated 
May  8,  1888,  case  No.  745,  and  No.  386,974  dated  July  31,  1888, 

3 


case  No.  741,  which  patents  cover  all  the  features  of  said  ap¬ 
plication. 

We  have  considered  all  the  points  therefore  concerning 
which  you  desire  information  except  as  to  your  enquiry  concerning 
the  old  disk  phonograph.  We  will  look  up  this  case  and  advise 
you  in  regard  to  it  immediately. 

Yours  truly, 

- * 

(F.l.D.) 


4 


fHodo .  ftne.j'i  cozuCif.  • 


£$ytr;C. 'is///uw//j  P  -  Jly {■/■,' 

;  Wff/r/t/j  ,f->  f&tr/nt/  //tttAifii.  JWw.  % f?)t 

***** 

December  15,1899. 


419,  dated  May  8th,  1888,  and  No.  484,582,  dated  October  18, 
1892,  with  a  view  of  determining,  in  accordance  with  your 
request,  whether' the  process  employed  in  the  making  of  gram¬ 
ophone  records  is  an  infringement  of  either  or  both  of  these 
patents. 


The  last-mentioned  patent  may  be  dismissed  from  con¬ 
sideration  at  the  start,  since  all  of  its  claims  are  limited 
to  the  coating  of  a  phonograph  record  with  a  metal  by  means 
of  a  vaporizing  process  carried  on  in  vacuo.  The  process 
used  in  the  duplication  of  gramophone  records  consists,  ac¬ 
cording  to  the  best  of  our  information,  in  first  tracing  the 
record  in  an  extremely  thin,  acid-resisting,  fatty  film, 
generally  in  the  presence  of  alcohol;  in  then  etching  the 
foundation  material  (generally  zinc)  through  the  lines  of 
the  record;  in  then  removing  the  coating,  whereby  a  posir 
tive  or  italio  is  secured;  in  then  making  a  cameo  negative 
or  matrix  therefrom,  generally  by  a  process  of  electrodepo¬ 
sition;  in  then  separating  the  matrix  from  the  original 
positive;  and  finally,  in  impressing  sheets  or  disks  of 


(T.  A.  E. ,  2) 

hard  rubber  or  analogous  material  with  the  matrix  so  ob¬ 
tained. 

In  your  patent  No.  382,419,  a  process  of  duplicating 
phonograms  by  knurling  is  described,  consisting  in  first 
coating  a  cylindrical  record  with  a  metal,  preferably-  by  va¬ 
porizing  the  metal  in  vacuo;  in  backing  up  the  infinitesi¬ 
mally  thin  coating  so  produced  by  a  second  coating  of  a  met¬ 
al,  such  as  lead  or  tin;  in  then  removing  the  original  rec¬ 
ord,  so  as  to  leave  a  shell  with  the  record  in  negative 
within  the  bore  of  the  same;  in  then  splitting  said  shell 
longitudinally;  in  then  either  bending  the  shell  flat  and 
supporting  it  on  a  flat  foundation  or  reversing  the  shell 
and  supporting  it  on  a  cylindrical  body;  and  in  finally 
making  copies  from  the  matrix  30  obtained  by  knurling. 

Your  patent  in  question  refers  to  your  British  pat¬ 
ent  No.  1644  of  April  24,  1878,  in  which  several  references 
are  made  to  duplicating  processes.  For  instance,  on  page 
7,  lines  34 — 39,  the  patent  says:r 

"If  the  copper  foil, or  tin-foil  with  copper  surface 
is  used,  and  a  matrix  of  iron- or  steel  made  by  electro¬ 
type  deposit  or  otherwise  upon  the  phonogram,  such  ma-. 
trix  may  be  hardened  and  used  for  impressing. a  sheet  or 
roller  of  metal  as.  hereafter  mentioned;  thereby  the 
original  phonogram  can  be  reproduced  Indefinitely  in 
metal  that  may  be  hardened  and  used  for  any  reasonable 
length  of  time  to  utter  the  sentence  or  words  or  sounds 
phonetically," 

On  page  10,  the  British  patent  statesir 


(T.  A.  E., 


3) 


"In  Pig.  60  one  roller  42  of  the  pair  is  made  of 
hardened  metal  with  the  sound  record  in  relief.  This 
is  obtained  by  electrotype  or  other  process  from  an 
iron  foil  or  other  metal  phonogram,  and  this  roller  is 
used  to  indent  strips  or  sheets  of  foil  or  rollers  to 
produce  copies  that  can  be  used  with  the  phonet.  Pig. 
61  represents  a  roller  42  of  hardened  metal  with  the 
record  in  relief  and  arranged  so  as  to  knurl  or  indent 
the  phonogram  in  a  roller  43  of  soft  metal  that  is  to 
be  pressed  against  the  roller  42  by  a  screw  nr  other 
suitable  means." 

The  patent  further  states,  page  11,  lines  15-18:- 

"In  copying  phonograms  or  making  duplicates,,  an 
original  phonogram  may  receive  a  deposit  of  copper  or 
iron  in  a  plating  bath;  and  if  of  iron  may  be  carbon¬ 
ized  to  convert  it  into  steel  and  hardened,  and  then  ■ 
the  same  should  be  baoked  up  with  type  metal  and  used 
for  impressing  strips  or  pieces  of  metal." 

The  essential  difference,  in  a  broad  sense,  between 
the  process  described  in  your  U.  S.  patent  No.  382,419  and 
in  your  British  patent  No.  1644,  was  that  in  the  former  the 
deposit  of  metal  for  obtaining  the  matrix  was  made  upon  a 
continuous  cylindrical  surface,  and  that  process,  therefore, 
necessitated  the  splitting  of  the  shell  so  obtained  and  the 
partial  or  entire  reversal  thereof,  to  enable  duplicates  to 
be  produced  by  knurling.  The  first  claim  of  the  U.  S.  pat¬ 
ent,  therefore,  was  specifically  limited  to  the  step  of  "re¬ 
moving  the  original  phonogram  and  opening  the  metallic  coat¬ 
ing",  and  the  second  claim  was  specifically  limited  to  the 
steps  of  "splitting  the  enclosing  coating  longitudinally" 
and  "bending  the  same  to  fonn  a  knurl";  in  view  of  which 
limitations,  we  do  not  consider  the  claims  to  be  infringed 


(T.  A.  E. ,  4) 

by  the  Berliner  process  of  making  gramophone  records* 

It  would  not  have  been  possible, at  the  time  of  the 
taking  out  of  your  U.  S.  patent  No.  382, 419, for  a  claim  to 
have  been  secured  which  would  cover  the  process  of  making 
gramophone  records,  since  such  a  claim  would  obviously  have 
to  cover  broadly  any  process  of  duplicating  sound  records 
by  first  making  a  matrix  in  a  metal  by  electro-deposition, 
and  then  using  such  a  matrix  to  make  copies  therefrom.  Such 
a  process  appears  to  be  clearly  indicated  in  your  British 
patent  No.  1644,  and  it  was  unquestionably  old  long  prior  to 
the  filing  date  of  your  application  for  U.  S.  patent  No. 
382,419.  For  instance,  in  "Engineering",  Vol.  XXV,  page 
186  (1879),  a  process  is  described  for  making  duplicates  of 
the  records  made  in  the  so-called  "six-penny  phonograph", 
said  prooess  consisting  in  first  making  an  original  record 
on  a  ridge  of  stearine,  then  coating  the  record  with  plumba¬ 
go,  then  electroplating  with  oopper,  then  removing  the  cop¬ 
per  matrix,  then  in  booking  it  with"lead  or  other  metal", 
and  in  finally  making  copies  from  the  matrix  so  obtained  in 
lead  wire  by  pressing  the  latter  into  the  matrix.,  The  pub¬ 
lication  states:- 

"From  one  copper  matrix  a  very  large  number  of  lead 
impressions  may  be  made,  and  we  are  told  that  the  whole 
process  can  be  gone  through  and  lead  wires,  each  con¬ 
taining  the  record  of  a  short  sentence,  can  be  made  and 
30ld  with  a  profit  for  one  halfpenny  each." 


(T.  A.  E.,  5) 

Since,  in  our  opinion,  your  patent  No.  382,419  was 
intended  to  cover  only  a  specific  difference  between  the 
process  thereof  and  the  disclosure  of  your  British  patent 
No.  1644,  we  do  not  consider  that  patent  to  be  infringed  by 
the  process  used  in  the  making  of  gramophone  records;  nor, 
as  we  have  above  indicated,  do  we  believe  it  would  have  been 
possible,  at  the  time  of  taking  out  your  patent  No.  382,419, 
to  obtain  a  claim  which  would  be  infringed  by  the  making  of 
suoh  records. 

Yours  very  truly, 

/hr'<  .  — - 


(F.L.D.) 


\Mrpr  _ 


/?/..)« -SWOtR 


'‘iS/r//>^tyr>r/\  December  28,1899. 

Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 

Orange,  N.J 

Dear  Sir:- 

Vfe  have  prepared  the  application  papers  on  your  im¬ 
proved  magnetic  separators,  and  bfeg  to  enclose  the  same 
herewith.  You  will  note  that,. in  regard  to  the  separator 
using  the  high  surface  speed fit  the  belt  and  utilizing  cen¬ 
trifugal  effect  to  facilitate  the  separation,  we  have  pre¬ 
pared  the  papers  for  two  /aaes.  Nos.  1022  and  1023,  one  on 
the  process  and  the  othefr  on  the  apparatus.  With  regard  to 
the  other  separator  for  separating  extremely  weak  magnetic 
materials,  we  have  p/epared  only  a  single  case  on  the  ap¬ 
paratus,  as  we  do  not  seo  how  a  claim  can  be  made  on  the 
process.  / 

We  beg  Jq  enclose  also  blue  prints  of  the  drawing 
which  will  be  /sad  in  cases  1022  and  1023,  showing  the  broad 
faced  separathr.and  also  a  blue  print  of  the. drawing  in  case 
1021,  showing  the  narrow  faced  separator.  We  have  indicat¬ 
ed  in  pencil  how  the  papers  are  to  be  executed. 

/  Yours  very  truly, 

/■  $  - - 

Enclosures. 


fttcAaixtJC&i/stv 

fl£Winfincts\ 
/>mtA  /.*Z)i/*n 


{jj*1  \  P  Cfi/yt/’,' 

fy/rtrifyw/l.  December  28,  1899. 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 
Orange, 

N.J. 


j*t  2-0 


Patents  have  been  obtained  In  England,  Prance,  Germany, 
Austria,  Belgium,  Hungary,  Italy,  Switzerland,  New  South  Wales 
and  Victoria,  and  applications  for  patents  are  pending  in  Russia, 
Sweden  and  Denmark,  on  the  electric  meter  employing  the  oscilla¬ 
ting  scale-beam  which  controls  the  register  mechanism  by  means 
of  the  long  escapement .  We  have  sent  you  copies  of  all  the 
patents  already  issued  except  the  German  patent,  which  has  Just 
been  received  and  which  we  enclose  herewith.  We  wrote  you  on 
July  19th  last  that  the  taxes  on  the  patents  in  Prance,  Belgium, 
Italy,  Switzerland,  Germany  and  Hungary,  and  on  the  unissued 
patent  in  Sweden,  were  due  the  following  month.  You  sent  us 
your  check  in  payment  of  said  taxes,  and  the  proper  payments  were 
made  by  us.  Other  taxes  in  connection  with  these  patents  will 
require  to  be  paid  during  the  coming  year,  and  in  some  instances 
the!  invent  ions  will  require  to  be  worked  if  the  patents  are  to 
remain  in  force.  Please  advise  us  if  you  wish  to  continue  to 
pay  the  taxes  and  effect  the  workings  in  connection  with  all  of 
these  patents,  and  if  there  are  any  which  you  may  not  consider 
of  sufficient  importance  to  warrant  further  disbursements,  please 
advise  us  and  we  will  cancel  the  same  from  our  books. 

Our  particular  purpose  in  writing  you  at  the  present  time 


is  to  notify  you  that  a  tax  on  the  Austrian  patent  and  the  work¬ 
ing  thereof  require  to  be  pqid  and  effected  ^respectively  on  or 
before  February  1,  1900.  The  amount  of  the  tax  is  $20,  and  the 
cost  of  the  working  is  about  $65.  If  you  wish. us  to  attend  to 
these  matters,  please  send  us  a  check. 

Yours  very  truly,, 

. - 


(F.L.D.) 


1899.  Phonograph  -  General  (D-99-17) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to 
the  commercial  and  technical  development  of  phonographs,  particularly  the 
business  of  the  National  Phonograph  Co.  Most  of  the  items  are  letters  to 
William  E.  Gilmore,  president  of  the  National  Phonograph  Co.,  from  Charles 
E.  Stevens,  foreign  agent  for  that  company.  Gilmore  and  Stevens  were 
organizing  phonograph  sales  abroad  even  though  the  Edison  United 
Phonograph  Co.  had  already  been  established  to  exploit  the  phonograph 
outside  the  United  States.  Also  included  are  several  items  pertaining  to  the 
domestic  phonograph  market  as  well  as  an  undated  memorandum  by  Edison 
discussing  financial  arrangements  to  be  made  with  Stevens.  Several  of 
Stevens's  letters  relate  to  motion  picture  as  well  as  phonograph  markets. 

Approximately  85  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  The 
following  items  have  not  been  selected:  perfunctory  patent,  trademark,  and 
legal  documents;  documents  that  duplicate  information  in  selected  items. 

The  records  of  the  National  Phonograph  Co.  for  the  period  1900-191 1 
were  removed  from  the  Document  File  and  organized  by  ENHS  staff  as  a 
separate  record  group.  A  finding  aid  is  available.  Selected  items  from  this 
record  group  can  be  found  in  the  Company  Records  Series. 


Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison, 

Orange,  N.  J. 

Mytdear  Sir; 

I  duly  received  your  favor  of  28th  ultimo,  in  regard  to 
business  carried  on  at  44  Broad  Street,  this  city,  by  Mr.  F.  M.  Prescott, 
under  the  title  of  "Edison  Phonograph  Agency"  and  advising  me  that  Mr. 
Prescott  has  ho  authority  to  use  the  above  tientioned  title,  and  requestiig 
that  all  the  mail  received  at  this  office  directed  as  described  should 
be  delivered  to  the  Rational  Phonograph  Co.  at  Broadway  and  26th  Street, 
New  York. 

In  reply,  I  have  to  say  that  Mr.  Prescott  has  furnished  me 
with  a  written  statement  in  regard  to  his  use  of  the  above  named  title, 
by  which  it  appears  that  he  was  engaged  in  business  during  1897  under 
the  name  of  "Edison  Phonograph  Agency*,  by  and  with  the  conse&jr  of  the 
Manager  of  the  National  Phonograph  Co*  that  about  May,  1898,  he  entered 
into  co-partnership  with  one  C.  E.  Stevens  to  continue  business  under 
the  same  title  and  at  the  same  address,  44  Broad  st. ,  N.Y.  that  sub¬ 
sequently  the  co-partnership  was  dissolved- and  by  mutual  consent  Mr. 
Prescott  was  to  liquidate  the  affairs  of  the  defunct  Agency;  that  he  is 
so  engaged  at  the  present  time;  that  he  is  not  now  advertising  or  using 
and  has  not  advertised  under  or  used  the  title  "Edison  Phonograph  Agency" 


since  the  dissolution  of  the  co-partnership,  ana  that  the  only  mattSr”nw 
carried  on  tinder  that  name  id- such  as  relates  to  the  former  business 
of  the  Agency.  He  also  advises  me  that  he  would  be  unable  to  successfully 
terminate  or  wind-up  the  affairs  of  the  Agency  should  the  mail  so  address¬ 
ed  be  diverted  from  him  and  he  desires  such  mail  delivered  to  him  as  form¬ 
erly.  I  have  accordingly  directed  that  all  mail  addressed  to  the  Edison 
Phonograph  Agency  shall  be  delivered  as  formerly  at  44  Broad  St.,\in 
accordance  with  the  regulations  of  the  Post  Office  Department.  You  have, 
however,  recourse  to  the  courts  to  tests  the  right  or  authority  of  Mr. 
Prescott  to  the  alleged  unauthorized  use  of  the  name  "Edison"  in 
connection  with  his  business,  and  should  you  succeed  in  restraining  him 
by  injunction  or  otherwise  from  the  use  of  the  name  "Edison"  the  order  of 
the  Court  will  be  respected  at  this  office'. 

I  am 


Very  respectfully, 


VIFQUAIN- PARIS 


€ie  ^iT)eriGair)e‘ da  P^opograpfye  Edisop 

39,  Bpalevard  cles  Gapucines,  39  j 


Orange,  N.J. 

Dear  Sir:- 


we  understand  that  .you  are  interested 
in  the  National  Phonograph  Co.,  Wehavesoras  friends, 
who  would  probably  purchase  the  entire  plant  and  if 
you  care  to  dispose  of  the  matter,  will  you  kindly \ 
let  us  know.  These  are  propitious  times  for  dis-  ’ 
■posing  of  such  interests  "Under  less  advantageous  ' 
circumstances,  such  interests  would  not  bring  any  •' 
desirable  figure  ' 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO., 


r.  JAMES  BUILDING, 


NEW  YORK  Uareh  2£,  1688, 


Phynograpl^business . 
i  As  as  muohto  your  interest  as  ours 


New  Jersey  &  Pa.  Opne  works.  / 

Orange,  N.  J.  j 

Deap  Sirs’*  \  \  j 

We. are. engaged  in- a  war  Witja  priee-outterB  and  dealers  whqse 
methods  tend  to  demoralize  the  Phqr 
Our  object  is  two  ) 

that  we  aucoeed  in  upholding  Wr/ retail  priaes  and  our  soale  or  dlspoiints. 

We  enclose list  of  suspended  dealqrs ,  whose  Supply  we  have  absolutely 
out  off. 

We  ask  you  to  oo-operate /with  us\for  our  mutual  good,  by  refusing 
to  supply  any  of  these  dealers  with  our  droaratue  and  by  signing  the 
enclosed  agreement,  and  returning  same  to  ink  \ 

Yours  very  truly\ 


[ENCLOSURE] 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO.. 


to  NEW  YORK. 


LIST  OF  SUSPENDED  DEALERS. 
NEW  YORK  March  25,  1899. 


New  York. — F.  M.  Prescott,  44  Broad  St.,  New  York  City. 

Columbia  Phonograph  Co.,  or  its  agents,  either  in 
N.  Y.  City  or  elsewhere. 

Sam 1 1  Nafew  Co.,  392  Broadway,  N.  Y.  City  &  167 
Dearborn  St.,  Chicago,  Ill. 

caSilwen?h!i,C°‘’.  °r}83  Nassau  N-  Y-  C“y- 

Union  Office  Supply  Co.,  83  Nassau  St.,  N.  Y.  City. 
Willis  Park  Row  Bicycle  Co.,  23  Park  Row,  N.  Y. 
City. 

Siegel  Cooper  Co.,  N.  Y.  City  &  Chicago,  Ill. 

R.  H.  Maoy  Co.,  N.  Y.  City. 

Providenoe,  R.  I — F.  P.  Moore,  Providenoe,  R.  I. 

The  Aroade  Co.,  Providence,  R.  I. 

Williams  &  Rankin,  Providenoe,  R.  I. 

Allen  Co.,  Providenoe,  R.  1. 

Newport,  R.  I - Neil  McLennon,  196  Thames  St.,  Newport,  R.  I. 

Danbury,  Conn. — James  McDonald,  Danbury,  Conn.' 

Hartford,  Conn - Brown,  Thompson  &  Co.,  Hartford,  Conn. 

Fall  River,  Mass. — The  Foster  Co.,  Fall  River,  Mass, 

Worcester,  Mass - Denholm,  McKay  &  Co.,  Worcester,  Mass. 

Philadelphia — Hawthorne  &  Sheble,  604  Chestnut  St.,  Philadel¬ 
phia,  Pa. 

Scranton,  Pa - Soranton  Novelty  Co.,  Scranton,  Pa. 

K.  A.  Weiohell,  Soranton,  Pa. 

Easton,  Pa — Keller's  Music  House  (William  H.  Keller),  Easton, 
Pa. 

Paterson,  N.  J. — Chas.  H.  Kelly,  25  No.  Main  St.,  Paterson,  N.  J.  ' 
Brooklyn,  N.  Y. — Wm.  Staats,  499  Flushing  Ave.,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 

Christian  Krabbe,  168  Broadway,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 
Wilkensburg,  Pa. — John  Mao  Williams,  Wilkensburg  or  Wilmerding,  Pa. 
Turtle  Creek,  Pa. — Robert  Williams,  Turtle  Creek,  Pa. 

We  ask  you  to  co-operate  with  us,  for  our  mutual  good  by  refusing 
to  supply  any  of  these  dealers  with  our  apparatus. 

NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO., 

C.  H.  WILSON, 

Manager  of  Sales. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO., 


ST.  JAMES  BUILDING, 
Broadway  and  a6th  Street,  New  York. 

JnEW  YORK.*00”"" 


NEW  YORK  March  25,  1899. 


IN  CONSIDERATION  of  the  sale  of  Edison  Phonographs  and  Edison 
Reoords  to  us  by  the  National  Phonograph  Co., 

WE  HEREBY  AGREE  that  we  will  not  wholesale  Edison  Phonographs 
or  Edison  Reoords  at  a  better  discount  than  authorized  or  in¬ 
structed  by  the  National  Phonograph  Co.,  nor  will  we  give  better 
delivery  than  f.  o.  b.  our  place  of  business;  that  we  will  give  no 
discount  whatever  from  published  list  prices  to  anybody,  either 
direotly  or  indirectly,  who  is  not  a  dealer  entitled  to  regular  dis¬ 
counts;  that  we  will  not  retail  Edison  Phonographs  or  Reoords  at 
less  than  the  published  list  price,  nor  will  we  inolude  with  a 
machine  at  list  price  any  extra  material  or  supplies  not  listed  to 
go  with  regular  outfits  by  the  National  Phonograph  Co. 

WE  FURTHER  AGREE  that  we  will  not  supply,  either  direotly  or 
indirectly,  Edison  Phonographs-  or  Edison  Reoords  to  dealers  who 
do  not  adhere  to  above  agreement,  nor  to  dealers  who  are  on  your 
* 'suspended  list.'' 

Sign  here _  __ 


We  send  you  this  AGREEMENT  in  duplicate.  Please  sign  and 
return  one  and  keep  the  duplicate  for  reference. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


*/' 

SSL.  &U„M',.m.  .«%** 

/im,i/Mt/rn  S  tVJ\;fMrrf/^m.^  x/..  v«jm> 

fy/w  March  25,  1899. 


Howard  W.  Hayes,  Esq., 

765  Broad  Street, 

Newark,  N.J. 

Dear  Judge :- 

Yours  of  17th  inst.,  rolating  to  assignments  of 
phonograph  patents  received.  1  recollected  tho  facts,  but 
to  make  it  certain  I  had  the  Patent  Office  records  looked  up 
On  January  16th,  1896,  Mr.  Edison  assigned  to  Mr. 
Hardin  as  Receiver  forty-four  patents.  On  the  same  date, 
Edison  Phonograph  Co.  assigned  to  Kir.  Hardin  three  patents. 

On  October  6th,  1896,  Mr.  Hardin  assigned  to  National  Phono¬ 
graph  Company  forty- four  patents,  and  on  tho  same  date,  by  a 
second  assignment,  Mr.  Hardin  assigned  to  the  National  Phono¬ 
graph  Company  three  patents.  You  will,  thereforo,  see  that 
the  transfer. of  tho  patents  was  complete. 


Your  oompany  holds  an  agreement  with  the  North  Amerioan 
Phonograph  Co.  and.  Jesse  II.  Lippincott,  sole  licensee  of  the  American 
Graphophone  Co.,  by  the  terms  of  which  your  company  is  licensed  to 
conduct  throughout  the  territory  comprising  the  states  of 


the  exclusive  business  of  using  and  leasing  phonographs  and  grapho- 
phones  and  the  sale  of  all  appliances  therefor,  as  well  as  the  Bale  and 
disposition  of  such  appliances  pursuant  to  the  terms,-  instructions 
and  provisions  as  set  forth  in  the  said  agreement,  and  in  and  by  said 
agreement,  it  is  provided  that  the  said  Phonograph  company  and  the 
Graphophone  company  will  deliver  all  such  supplies  and  applianoes  for 
phonographs  and  graphophones  during  the  continuance  of  suoh  agree- 
ment  as  may  be  called  for  by^your  company  at 6  certain  price  therein 
fixed. 

In  or  about  the  year  1893,  the  North  American  Phonograph  Co. 
under  the  presidency  of  Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison,  entered  into  an  agree¬ 
ment  with  your  company  whereby  it  agreed  to  pay  you  a  certain  percent¬ 
age  upon  the  gross  sales  in  your  territory,  thus  acknowledging  the 
rights  of  your  oorapany  under  the  first  mentioned  oontraot. 

Subsequently  the  said  North  Amerioan  Phonograph  Co.  wont  into 
the  hands  of  a  receiver  and  all; its  assets  passed  by  purohase  to 
Thomas  A.  Edison.  We  are  informed  that  the  said  Thomas  A.  Edison 

( over 


or  Ms  agents  and  the  Graphophone  company  have  established  themselves 
within  the  territory  covered  by  your  oontraot,  and  have  engaged  in 
business  therein  in  violation  of  the  terms  thereof,  to  yojar  great 
damage.  They  have  also  negleoted  and  Refused  to  manufacture  and' 
deliver  instruments  and  appliances  in  connection  th  erewith  in  accord¬ 
ance  with  your  repeated  demands  therefor,  and  have  consequently  com¬ 
mitted  various  breaches  of  the  agreement  in  question  to  your  great 
damago . 

This  agreement  together  with  supplemental  agreements  affeoting 
the  same. have  been  submitted  to  us  for  examination  by  you,  and  we  have 
also  carefully  examined  the  papers  in  a  suit  brought  in  the  Circuit 
Court  of  the  United  Statesfor  the  distriot  of  Massachusetts  by  the  Amer¬ 
ican  Graphophone  Co.  against  the  New  England  Phonograph  Co. ,  with 
which  suit  you  are  doubtless  familiar.  After  careful  perusal  of 
these  papers,  we  have  oome  to  the  conclusion  that  .the  Araerioan  Graph¬ 
ophone  Co.  and  Thomas  A.  Edison  as  successor  to  the  North  Araerioan 
Phonograph  Co., are  liable  in  damages  to  your  oorapany,  and  to  the 
other  companies  occupying  the  position  of  what  are  called  sub-companies 
acting  h«der  licenses  from  the  American  Graphophone  Co.  and  the  North 
American  Phonograph  Co.,  and  that  this  liability  in  our  opinion  is 
perfectly  clear  and  tindlspute4^e_,_ 

Very  truly  yours. 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO., 

EDISON  LABORATORY, 

•  ORANGE,  N.  J. 


ORANGE  July  19>  1899> 

The  Biglow  &  Main  co. ,  - 

I.  Allen  Sankey,  3Ssq.,  Pres., 

13S  Fifth  Ave.,  Hew  York. 

•  Dear  sirs 

Ref erring  to  our  various  conversations,  as  to  our  making  up 
for  your  account  special  records,  made  by  Mr.  Ira  D.  Sankey,  my  under¬ 
standing  of  this  is  as  follows: 

1st.  You  are  to  furnish  us  with  first  class  accepted  masters 
without  charge.  These  masters  we  will  place  in  stock  and  hold  subject 
to  your  order,  making  no  duplicates  from  same,  except  upon  actual  orders 
from  you  so  to  do,  the  intention  being  to  keep  the  masters  in  a  safe 
place  and  use  them  up  to  a  point  where  they  become  so  rough  that  fur¬ 
ther  good  duplicates  oannot  be  made  from  same.  Should  it  be  found 
necessary  to  make  a  stock  of  duplicates  from  any  such  masters,  to  be 
held  in  stock,  then  in  that  case  we  will  undertake  to  provide  a  suit¬ 
able  stook  room  for  the  purpose,  so  that  there  will  be  little,  if  any§= 
delay  in  filling  orders  that  we  may  receive  from  you.  We  would  also 
add  in  connection  with  this  that  masters  sometimes  become  damaged  by 
continuous  handling,  but  we  will  of  course  use  every  precaution  to 
prevent  damage  or  breakage,  so  far  as  it  is  possible  to  do  so,  Should 
you  decide  at  any  time  that  you  prefer  to  have  masters  made  by  ourselves, 
we  would  be  glad  to  furnish  the  necessary  plant  for  the  taking  of  such 
masters,  either  in  some  portion  of  our  plant  here  at  West  Orange,  if.  j., 
or  at  a  suitable  spot,  to  be  selected  by  ourselves  in  New  York  city. 

It  is  our  intention  to  furnish  you  with  the  standard  blanks  or 
records,  the  size  of  which  is  about  4  3/l6«  in  length  by  2  3/16"  in 
_ the  event  of  our  making  the  masters,  the  recording  and 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO., 

EDISON  LABORATORY,  • 

ORANGE,  N.J. 

ORANGE 

The  Biglow  &  Main  Qo.  (2)  7/19/99. 

finishing  of  same,  as  also  the  manufacturing  and  finishing  of  the  du¬ 
plicates  of  same,  will  be  done  in  the  best  manner  possible  known  to 
ourselves. 

2nd.  The  price  to  be  charged  you  for  these  duplicate  records  will 
be  twenty-five  cents  (25/)  each  net,  such  price  to  cover  all  wrapping, 
packing  and  boxing,  f . o. b.  Orange,  II.  J. ,  or  in  the  event  of  your  order 
lng  such  duplicate  records  in  not  less  than  one  barrel  lots  we  will 
undertake  to  deliver  them  at  your  place  of  business,  Ho.  135  Fifth 
Aye., 'Hew  York,,  without  extra  charge.  If  at  the  end  of  three  months 
from  August  1st,  1899,  your  orders  for  duplicate  records  shall  amount 
in  the  aggregate  to  not  les3  than  ten  thousand  (10,000)  duplicate 
records,  we  will  then  make  a  net  price  to  you  of  twenty  cents  (20/) 
each  on  same,  crediting  you  at  the  rate  of  five  cents  (5/)  each  for 
all  records  shipped  prior  thereto.  Terms  of  payment  to  be  thirty  days 
net. 

3rd.  In  the  event  of  your  placing  any  orders  with  us,  it  is 
distinctly  understood  by  us  that  all  of  these  masters  and  all  of  the 
duplicate  records  manufactured  from  same  are  your  property  and  that  we 
will  not  dispose  of  or  ship  them  to  anybody,  except  upon  proper  author¬ 
ity  from  you  so  to  do.  In  the  event  of  the  termination  of  this  arrange¬ 
ment  at  any  time  and  should  we  have  any  stock  of  such  duplicate  records 
on  hand,  then  in  that  case  we  are  to  have  the  option  of  shipping  them 
to  you,  charging  them  at  the  price  above  indicated. 

4th.  This  arrangement  can  be  terminated  by  either  party  upon 


nationXi,  PHONOGRAPH  CO., 

t  EDISON  LABORATORY, 
ORANGE,  N.J. 


ORANGE 

The  Biclow  &  Main  Co.  (3)  7/19/99.  ..h— 


ninety  days  written  notice. 

I  think  I  have  covered  about  all  the  points  in  this  matter,  but 
if  there  fire  any  others  that  oocur  to  you,  I  should  be  vary  ulad,  of 
course,  to  have  you  write  me,  and  I  feel  certain  that  everything  can  be 
straightened' out  to  our  mutual  satisfaction. 

In  conclusion  I  can  only  say  that  our  intention  is  to  furnish  you 
with  these  special  records  in  exactly  the  same  manner  as  we  now  furnish 
our  own  particular  type  of  records  to  dealers  and  the  public  chorally, 
unless  you  decide  to  have  different  colored  boxes,  labels,  etc.,  and 
in  that  case  the  expense  of  furnishinc  such  boxes,  etc.,  would  necess¬ 
arily  have  to  be  assumed  by  you. 

In  order  that  you  can  go  over  this  matter  again  carefully,  I  am 
returning  to  you  the  form  of  agreement  that  you  sent  me,  for  compari¬ 
son. 

Yours  very  truly, 


vm/im 

Enc- 


President. 


I  take  pleasure  in  acknowledging  with  thankB 
the  receipt  of  the  model  of  the  "Spectacle"  Phonograph 
presented  by  you,  through  the  National  Phonograph  Com¬ 
pany,  Orange,  New  Jersey,  to  the  National  Museum.  It 
is  an  exceedingly  interesting  addition  to  our  collec¬ 
tions. 

Yours  respectfully, 


(Accession  35337}. 


•  <y(l  /d  -  "  "■  *  (va”  o  /’ 

Xs—  y 

-zgy^  ^  (7) 

y.  x#«^sr„U- ,  .—  __  "  * *w  -€*-< 

*—  *- .— — , „  _  ^  ; 
x  y-  “* ~=<  _  x*  . 


.  /C?5«^xc-o  *— 

<±J-^f^c^,  JZ^o  <2.  —  ‘Vee^^  ^  „  , 

^y/AA'tyr""  -io^JLX  ^  ^ .,  : 

*^Sb  ^ 


^y  y. 


Mr.  W.  E.  Gilmore, 


RECEIVED'; 
aw-swsw-  I 


Mgg.aL_ _ _ !  J 

Will  you  please  send  me  a  1 istToT" 'CTe ’ Ma s t e r  records 
mads  by  my  father,  you  have  in  your  possession.  I  want  to  find 
out  how  many  records  of  each  song  I  have  up  to  date.  The  ones 
we  have  made  lately  are  100#  better  than  the  first  ones.  I  have 
about  250  Masters  here  I  have  tested  myself,  and  I  wish  you 


1  will  send  you  some  time  in  the  early  part  of  next  week 
600j{  of  those  special  boxes,  w^had  made,  you  to  give  us  credit 
for  $3 .25  per  1000  when  sold,  also  the  labels  to  go  dn  them. 

I  saw  Mr.  Shattuolc  yesterday  and  he  told  me  about  your 
decision  as  to  circulars.  Thank  you  very  much. 

I  am  now  advertising  in  religious  papers  whoSe  combined 


circulation  is  nearly  eight  hundred  thousand,  so; you  may  expect 
business  pretty  soon.  The  AdS  start  Sept.  1st. 

Could  I  see  you  here  in  the  City  Monday? 


Yours  sincerely, 


[TO  JOHN  R.  SCHERMERHORN?] 


J.  R.  SV;  '  ' 

-  "T  ‘  j  'Here  is  the  arrangement  with  the  Biglow*  Main  Co.  Do 

not'forget  to  answer. that  letter  to  Mr.  Sankey  early  next  week,  about 
number  iof  master  records  that  we  have  in  stock,  and  you  are  to  send 
ima  man  for  an  additional  quantity  that  he  has  on  hand.  We  have  got 
.to  make  arrangements  to  carry  this  stock  under  lock  and  key,  as  we  will 
of-  course  be  responsible  for  it  once  it  comes  into  our  possession.  I  pre 
sume  that  you  can  arrange  this,  however. . 


, 8/31/99. 


W.  E.  0. 


West  Ilth.  8t.  N.  Y.  400  of  our  special  Boxes  for  the  Sankey  re¬ 
cords. 


On  Tuesday  or  Wednesday  of  next  week  we  will  send  you 
1000  more.  Please  take  care  of  them.  The  crate  of  1000  is  re¬ 
turnable  . 

We  also  send  you  to-day  by  U.  S.  Express,  11.600  la¬ 
bels  of  each  of  our  different  records.  Please  label  all  the  box¬ 
es  with  the  different  labels  at  once  as  we  will  send  you  an  or¬ 
der  for  600  records  the  first  of  next  week,  and  we  want  to  be 
able  to  fill  all  orders  at  once. 

Mr.  Gilmore  promised  to  send  a  man  in  here  for  the 
balance  of  our  master  records,  so  please  hurry  up  as  we  want  you 
to  duplic  ate  them  at  once.  Please  take  the  best  of  care  of 
these  masters  as  they  cannot  be  replaced. 

Yours  Truly, 


3 


*V6ritables  Jtppareils  “Edison”  d’J£m6rique 

54,  Faubourg  Saint-Honor6, 


INE  PARLANTE  “  EDISON " 

h  partirdc  40  frs. 
jusqu'b  2,5oo  frs. 


Tous  les  cyllndrea  de  la 
malson  ont  6t6  impresslonnis 
par  les  artistes,  compositeurs  et 


<2$ 

fc>-e-*ytuLjL.  _ 

<££*  ,-^€L 


Adressc  Titegraphique : 

“GO^iVEREL,  Paris. 11 

"V £ritables  JCppareils  “  €{dison”  d’£Cm6rique 


54,  Faubourg  Saint-Honore, 


National  Phonoaraph  Co.'s  and  Edison  Manufacturing  Co.’s  Apparatus. 


C.  E.  Stevens, 

Edison  Building, 

44  Broad  Street,  New  York,  N.  Y. 


Thomas  A. 

EDISON’S 


Phonographs, 

Projecloscopes, 
Original  Films, 
Kinetoscopes, 

X  Hay  Apparatus, 
Fan  Motors, 
Lalande  Batteries, 
Dental  Outfits. 
Surgical  Outfits. 


New  York,  N.  Y.,  U.  S.  A., 
Sept.  2,  1899 


Mr.  w.  E.  Gilmore, 

President  National  Phono.  Co., 

Orange,  N.  J. 

Dears, iir; 

I  am  in  receipt  of  your  esteemed  favor  of  the  1st  inst. 
enclosing  order  from  Jambon  &  Co.,  Calcutta,  India,  also  copy  of  your 
letter.  I  will  be  glad  to  execute  this  order  upon  the  conditions 
mentioned  therein,  and  instructions  as  to  draft,  etc;,  will  be  care¬ 
fully  carried  out. 

Thanking  you  for  your  kind  interest  in  this  matter,  I  am. 


FREDK.  D’A.  GOOLD 

54,  Faubourg  Saint- Honor6 


S>ws,  Slance  6th  Sept. /99 

Orange,  Ni*-  Jersey,  U.S.M 


See.,  An.,  &C.  In  this  land  of  "make  haste  slowly"  I  am 

still  existing  and  gradually  sizing  up  the  situation. 

Ooold  has  not  opened  as  yet,  waiting  the  arrival  of 
the  last  consignments  of  goods,  which  we  expect  will  be  delivered 


I  had  a  long  and  pleasant  talk  with  the  Pathe’s  and 
I  can  gather  they  are  doing  a  very  large  business. 


working  on  the  line^  of  selling  quantities 
eliminating  qaetjUnW/'.  Columbia  are  appare 


i  close  margins  and 


eliminating  quaJKrtHbjjf.  Columbia  are  apparently  doing  but  little. 
Strange  to  say  Pathe  is  buying  large  quantities  of  goods  from 
them,  at  the  same  time  bearing  tham  no  good  will.  As  Pathe 
puts  it  "Edison  is  a  great  man;  Columbia,  pooh!  Edison  Bell, 
pooh!  Pathe  told  me  that  they  are  employing  about  900  hands 
inclusive  of  360  in  their  blank  department.  He  quoted  me 
blanks  at  6  cents  f.o.b  Paris  in  quantities  of  50,000;  films 
of  fine  quality  24  Frs.  or  ^4.80  net.  I  shall  endeavour  to 
send  you  samples  of  their  films. 

For  your  information,  Pathe  purchased  from  the  United 
States  Co.  50  Edison  Spring  Motors  at  a  low  price. 


F.D'A.  GOOLD 


Folio _ 2. 


On  these  they  have  fitted  duplicates  of  the  Edison  tops,  manu¬ 
factured  by  themselves.  I  saw  one, of  these  machines  in  their 
private  office  but  was  unable  to  obtain  the  number. 

They  also  stated  to  me  that  they  received  a  quotation  from 
this  same  Company  of  20  cents  net  on  records. 

I  shall  remain  here  long  enough  to  get  Ooold  fairly 
established.  Nothing  can  be  done  here  without  French  litera¬ 
ture,  which  it  will  be  necessary  to  distribute  thoroughly 
throughout  this  country,  and  I  am  sure  excellent  results  will 
rqEu What  I  want  to  do  is,  work  "ir^French  business  on  the 
same  lines  as  I  work  my  own  -  letting  them  all  know  theij;  we  are 
established  and  are  here  for  business. 

Mr.  Ooold  intends  to  work  for  our  Interest  in  his 
own  name,  as  you  will  see  from  the  letter  paper  on  which  this  is 
written.  But  just  at  present  business  is  very  dull  dealers 
report,  as  pleasure  at  this  time  of  the  year  is  paramount. 

I  am  disappointed  in  the  time  it  takes  to  accomplish  results 
but  in  the  end  I  am  sure  I  will  be  rewarded. 

I  received  to-day  a  letter  from  Pratt  om  the  Edison 
Bell  Co.  in  relation  to  some  Concerts  and  Gems  and  I  expect  to 
return  to  London  any  day  when  advised  of  the  return  of  the 
Board  of  Directors. 

Clark  has  quite  an  establishment  here,  but  as  far  as 
I  can  determine  he  has  done  no  business,  living  in  anticipa¬ 
tion  thereof.  I  find  that  a  great  deal  of  m^/ business  which 
was  apparently  for  France  was  in  reality  for  the  Continent, 
goods  being  held  in  the  Custom  House  here  and  re- shipped. 


i 


F.D'A.  GOOLD  Fo/fe-3 _ 

I  therefore  anticipate  good  results  when  I  am  able  to  move  from 
this  point,  but  as  stated  before,  I  am  anxious  yto'sgeit  this  end 
of  it  running  smoothly  before  moving  on.  .u.  - 

By  the  way,  it  may  be  that  the  interesting  litera¬ 
ture  sent  out  by  Prescott  may  interfere  with  my  London  arrange¬ 
ment. 

I  have  been  somewhat  under  the  weather,  but  am  now 
feeling  very  well. 

With  kindest  regards  to  you  and  yours,  and  remem¬ 
brances  to  Mr.  Edison  and  my  old  friend  John, 

I  am,  /7 


Yours  very  truly, 


[FROM  JOHN  R.  SCHERMERHORN] 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO., 

EDISON  LABORATORY, 

'  ORANGE,  N.J. 

ORANGE  fiept.  fi,1099,. 

Biglow  ft  Main  Co.,  . ‘"™ 

X.  Allen  Sankey,  J!sq, ,  Pres.,  MraT,„„ 

135  Fifth  Ave . ,  Jlew  York . 

Dear  Sir: 

Yon  possibly  are  not  av/are  of  the  fact  that  v/e  do  not,  put 
labels  on  the  oartons  which  we  use;-  that  is  done  by  the  manufacturers 
of  the  boxes.  Can  you  not  arrange  with  the  people  who  are  making  your 
boxes  to  label  them?  They  can  do  it  much  more  cheaply  than  we  and  do 
a  much  more  satisfactory  job.  If  you  could  arrange  to  do  so,  it  would 
be  a  great  accommodation  to  us,  and  also  very  much  expedite  the  ship¬ 
ment  of  any  orders  that  you  may  place  with  us. 

V/e  are  not  quite  clear  as  to  whether  or  not  you  have  any  more 
masters  at  present  ready  for  delivery;  will  you  kindly  advise  us  on 
this  point? 

Yours  very  truly, 


.JRS/lVW 


Asst.  General  Manager. 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO., 

EDISON  LABORATORY, 
ORANGE,  N.J. 


ORANGE  sept,  n,  ie90. 


Blglow  fa  Main  Co.,  - — - 

X.  Allen  Sankey,  Ksq.,  Pres., 

135  Fifth  Ave^>,  Hew  York. 

Dear  Sir: 

X  duly  received  your  letter  of  the  7th  inst.,  and  as  I  advised 
you  by  phone,  your  letter  of  the  5th  and  the  144  records  which  you  sent 
at  the  same  tiwe^also. 

With  respeot  to  the  tickets  such  as  we  use  and  which  we  note  you 
are  to  supply,  would  make  the  following  suggestion,  that  you  also  civs 
your  records  a  cataloeue  number.  It  is  rather  difficult  for  us  to  mark 
the  name  of  the  title  on  the  outside  of  the  box;  our  practice  is  to 
simply  put  the  cataloeue  number  thereon.  I  note  that  your  small  slips 
number  them  from  1  to  20  consecutively.  We  are  using  the  same  catalogue 
numbers,  and  I  would  suggest  that  you  use  a  symbol  as  well  as  the  number. 
Por  instance:  the  letter  "8",  and  have  the  catalogue  numbers  read, 

"8-1“,.  ''8-2'',  etc. 

The  500  records  which  you  have  ordered  are  now  being  made,  and  we 
will  ship  them  to  you  just  as  quickly  as  vie  can  get  them  out  and  get  the 
boxes  properly  labelled.  On  this  particular  lot  we  will  write  tickets 
for  them.  On  further  consideration,  I  think  it  advisable  that  v*>  give 
them  catalogue  numbers,  as  above  suggested,  and  will  instruct  our  people 
to  mark  them  accordingly;  that  is,  using  the  letter  "S"  in  front  of 
the  number  which  you  have  on  the  slips  sent  me  to-day.  This  will  enable 
you  to  readily  locate  the  different  records,  without  going  to  the  trouble 
of  taking  them  out  of  the  paper  cartons. 


NATIONAL  PHONO'GRAPH  CO., 

EDISON  LABORATORY, 
ORANQE.N.J. 


ORANGE 

B.  A  H.  Co.  (2)  9/0/99. 


I  find  that  we  have  a  total  of  199  master  records  now  In  stock, 
list  of  which  follows: 

15-  The  Ninety  and  Nine 

1G-  Throw  Out  the  Life  Line 
27-  Raved  by  Grace 

16-  When  the  Mists  Have  Rolled  Away 

3-  Faith  is  the  Victory 

11-  Where  is  My  Wondering  Boy 

9-  A  Shelter  in  tho  Time  of  Storm 
10-  Nye  Hath  Not  Seen 

4-  Safe  in  the  Aims  of  Jesus 
.15-  True  Hearted,  Whole  Hearted 
10-  On  Calvary's  Brow 

5-  Wonderful  Words  of  Life 

12-  Under  His  Wines 

9-  There'll  Be  No  Bark  Valley 
8-  God  be  with  you  Till  We  Meet  Aeain 

4-  Jesus  of  Nazareth  Passeth  By 

6-  The  Homeland 

2-  The  Mistake  of  Jfy  Life 

5-  Shall’  You,  Shall  I? 

4-  My  Jesus  I  love  Thee. 

4-  Nearer  My  God  to  Thee 
4-  Almost  Persuaded. 


Yours  very  truly, 


JRS/IWW 


Asst.  General  Manager, 


■^^~^€/ULjOdL . '/<?&.? 

rmrm 


PARIS  l  /7  ^  *  '  ^**  ti 

/■. _  StmJMM 


\  StLi/  O^L-<r-^  J 

e-t^x 

I  <&  <^C^.c£*..y  (3p  -^2 

<2^^  '/'y£  y^~yc^Ly^4 

%  joCl  ^ 


“Tlr^ty^L  <zy*rz^-^£,  " 
o^i-  royo-rt^  ~cjj 

■  •  <^c/gi  _s  sy/\p  ^  ^  ^ 

■ 

vftly.  'y^-eL-^-e^- '  'TZ't-.v  /Q-^e_j_^ 

^  €l£*^U,  ^ 


<0$  *£vuutL  <Z-y  &^CtJlfUL*f**£+r^ «— 

'~'^oXcaC^  <?ytf  ■■<£.:■  -w^<> 

tfsl/fatyf  ’; .  $CXXt*ts^<^C*CAA —  xfAL-<ttxCjL-J  ^  *2*2 4—6t — ^^c^c^c_y 

'~?C-'^LA.  'ij^J^-^i  -7'i^^t-X,  (o^Ccyt^reXJ  & cr~cr-e>Cy  X<-*-4-.  ~2^_,6 b-cJ)  ^-X^XXX^tLX^^  J 

^UO  C/^L't'C*/  J  O^cxC  XL ^t&LXXX-s 

(c£?  O-ZXS'  (s<!yL^ecjLg__j  'T^XXX^ d}>t^L-^ 

-stilus  ~7&>  (£' 

/tU^V^&gsit^c-f  T^-eyS-g-'  5*7^-  '^st^a.y.  (  ^^a^-^sQAP-— 

Xc£u*t/  ^tJ-a-^^£t^  Tn'uuiJfy  *-t^.  __ 

|g//fi.  (j^MV  t^t-y  <^/<^<^{  ^ 

xuf\  ^AJ^c^cAzr  J  id^o  AXxjfjl^  oCe^cAjL^a  iAtuy 

:y5r 

.  Qoi)  '^.-rxzjEtl* 

GL^cs^U*  ~  ( 


ZA-3 


esoeX  0-o£A-T- 


a  ~^^sZL?X£LA£. 

.  cx^a^f-^t>€x^  dh\A  J^£r 


tfUJbC  't/L^  7U/.  (Zt,  CxLy*^, 


:, .  {Oo>14^^Lxl<i  c^>  ??r?£<S<2^  '-^trvc'  ^oct-c^C 
sL&QjU^jZS  ~^j02¥  eotsc^  - 


s 


^is^ey  t7-t^eA{!_^ 

tr7^t.ac^uJ£y  ‘PiTTi'wh?  /ftasi^C*  \^ajnn>  t? 

ct^c^nCs  •'< iLrzyfa^Cjtz^Zc^  •*/  JC^t_ 

*7si-es)£j<  ^(fco  'Pt-^&C  <*~y>'^, 

^-^<9.000  '^-eu4«^>-'-'  - 

Q^CS~&-C-<^  C $3$  */^00 

<ra&,  <M^  /jtfTtyizrPr?  ‘^z^-*x-st^£<r  1_ 

»~&c-  JZZ^C,  'T&o&zfc 

■■•  ’  <?-tr?^7^  ■  ,  y 


&£& -<t-^£^-w, 

-^^^A-y  '^-$^et. — t*-(L.  &L*t^t--e~}(  ^*?- ,  •■^y'*£&£s  <2^-a«_e_  ? 

^CypUy  ''Z'*-*-'*- (Pu-ct/l^  s&Lcy^  J?r*t^jLs  /&j-iue_^.  < 

Z^£kz8=r-  iSu0-4^-t^C^n .  r  ...  ■■ 

c5  rrt^CC'  y/kA^&Zj£jty  /QJU-  ZC^C^>  CL*yct**c, c  C^ .: 

'izlcCfZ.  ajf  (SjCAjCU^' '?^&<j^c££^a  ^/-->^>^.  .  • 

S^TZy  S^^-e,  va-^c- ^e-A  '^y^^uLs  <y~tx~^  (^£cc^u^^>  y  Ok&ty^  s(U)  «-X 

j^}Sl£s<LC£^-  '-£u^Cst*jCstu*  y^a  <5t_-  <S^)L^66^  _ 

/SL^r//oe-  'P^yk^y  a~ex  cLsCjC  <Ayk*^/6y  . , 

‘^''^  /^L^A_e^  ^yt^jL^tA^  ol^  s^JUtCeX7  ^  xLf^zUy 

'-iCy<-&&  &y )^L4^e^.  x*^stsuL^  -<*<i^t^cy-  &\ay^  ,^<^>  yya-t^y  cxy  '^zy' 

■yuJttZjsistscy  ,  fr^c^s^  ^Lstfjuy  y^tysuz^L^zJ^  ^ 

n  ^  Oastuxf  t^<J\  /> 

q££*J:S&.. 


— C^^£?S .  ois<Lj  *<LcCl~  s&d 

•,  _ _ _  -  .  ..  .O*  ^  ^  kVl  <7 


yyr^£L,  yt^fasrk 
y-Jzjt  'J&^OLtscX 


~cJCe^rx  -^i*-*s?r-r-y  ,  '  *  -■  ,.  ;| 


S* — ■ 


Ot'^cX^j  CT - " 


W.  A.  Gilmore,  Esq., 

General  Manager  Edison  Laboratory, 
Orange,  New  Jersey.  U. S.A. 


My  dear  Mr.  Gilmore 

I  am  in  receipt  of  your  favour  of  the  14th,  and  note  en¬ 
closures.  As  to  the  German  business  I  think  that  I  have  arranged 
matters  satisfactory  so  as  vtd  a'voi'd  .anjr.:.tt*'ouble,  the  details  of  which 
I  will  explain  to  you  when  1  return.  It  was  high  time  that  something 
was  done  here  as  the  business  is  horibly  cut  up,  local  manufacturs 
having  taken  advantage  of  the  conditions  hejre,  and  have  thrown  on 
to  the  market  all  kind  of  chp.ap"' infringements.  I  will  be  sending  you 
in  a  day  or  two  samples  o'f  ’-these  machines,  the  prices  vary 

from  15  to  30  marks.  I  am  not  positive  but  I  think  that  the  largest 
and  best  machine  I  am  sending  you  sells  for  about  $4.1  will  advise 
you  definitely  on  this  point  when  I  receive  the  bill.  The  people  here 
T.&  Co  have  done  a  great  deal  of  advertising  and  have ■  promised  to 
exploit  the  business  to  the  fullest  extent  gutting  uM°on  the  road 
and  continuing  to  advertise  on  a  large  They  are  already  rea¬ 

ping  the  benefits  of  advertising  done  and  I  expeit  through  them  to 
work  up  a  large  business.  Since  I  have  been  abroad  I Lam- convinced 
that  the  only  way  business  can  be  properly  exploited  is  in  hiving 
an  organization  in  the  capital  of  the  different  countries.  I  have  Wd 
a  number  of  engagements  with  Block  and  I  expect  to  close  with  him  in 
a  day  or  two  for  Russia,  that  is  as  head  quarters  for  a  Russian 
business.  It  will  be  necessary  however  to  extend  to  him  4  months  cre¬ 
dit  as  he  assures  me  that  in  order  to  do  business  extensively  his 
house  is  obliged  to  give  12  months  to  2  years  credit.  In  fact  he  is 
receiving  from  some  American  manufacturers  12  to  18  months  on  their 


goods.  If  I  close  with  him  which  there  is  little  doubt  ai'out  an  " 
important  order  will  follow., -as  he  is  prepared. to  take  a  hold  of  '  : 

the  business  .in  an  energetic  way. ,1  am  going  to  Hamburg  tomorrow  to 
arrange  about  storing  some  goods  and  expect  to  leave  for .Vienna  in-  ’ 
the  next  3  or  4  days  to.  arrange,  for  the  Austrian  business. 

I  sincerely .hope  that:  you  have  been  able  to  improve  the 
Gem  and  that  you  are  prepared  to  supply  Recorders  with  it,  as  the 
machine  as  it.  now  stands- is.  unpopular  abroad  on  account  of  no  ; 

,  recording  apparatus.  ' 

.  -  •  ,  Mr..  .Block  sen*  kindest-  regards  to-  Mr. '  Edi  son.  v  • f  »• 

Referring.  to.  the-  Edison  bell  matter  inasmuch  as  you  are  now 
"negodiating  .with,  -them  direct  -I  shall  discontinue  negociations  with'  ""'''' 
them' until  I  am  advised  by  you.  to' the  contrary:  I  came  to  a  partial  . 
understanding  with  them  and  secured  some  orders,  the  stipulation 
I  made  in  connect!  pr^w^h,  the  discounts  given  them  was  that  I  would 
cooperate  with  them  in  the  Extension  of  the  business  in  Great  Britain, 
but  that  on  the  other  hand  they  v/ere  not  to  interfere  with  my  trans¬ 
actions  in  the  Colonies,  and  this  arrangement  1  have  no  doubt  would 
or  C0Jid  have  beeP,  carried  out  had  I  the  opportunity  of  meeting  Lord 
DenbyAwhom  Pratt ^promised  to  make  an  appointment  with  me  on  my  return 
to  London.  The  discounts  for  this  agreement  v/as  40  &  10. on  phono¬ 
graphs  excepting  the  Gem  and  on  the  Gem  40%  and  on  Records  and  Blanks 
50  and  5  all  f.o.b. .Southampton.  Of  course  you  will  understand 
that  you  cannot  expect  to  do  much  v/ith  them  in  Standards,  as  Pratt 
advised  me  that  Moriarity  saddled  10,000  of  this  type  on  them  at.  a 
prohibitive  price  i.e.  at  a  price  which  makes  it  impossible  for  them 
to  compete  with  me  and  they  can  never  expect  to  do  business  on  the 
lines  on  which  they  are  now  waiting, as  I  have  already  advised  you  of 
the  prices  asked  by  them  for  the  different  types  of  machines  you 
will  understand  my  meaning.  I  expect  to  eventually  work  up  a  thorough 
European. organization  but  I  assure  you  it  is  not  brought  about  in  the 
same  rapid  manner  as  at  home,  as  business  here  seems  to  be  secondary 
to  pleasure,  however  the  world  seems  to  rill  on  nevertheless.  I  have 
no  t  been  able  to  go  into  your  letters  and  those  from  Judge  Hayes  as 
they  were  just  received.  I  will  carefully  peruse  and  digest  the 
different. subjects  and  will  write  you  further. From  letters  that  I 
am  receiving  from  Spain  I  expect  to  do  some  very  important  business 
there  when  I  get  around  to  it. 

With  kindest  regards  to  yourself  and  family  and  to  my  old 
friend  John  and  Mr.-sEaison, 

I  am, 

Tours  very  truly 


National  Phonograph  Co.’s  and  Edison  Manufacturing  Co.’s  Apparatus. 


C.  E.  Stevens, 


Edison  Building, 

Broad  Street,  New  York,  N.  Y. 


Thomas  A. 

EDISON’S 


Phonograph!, 

Projectoscopei, 
Original  Films, 
Klnetoscopes, 

X  Ray  Apparatus, 
Fan  Motors, 

Lalande  Batteries^ 
Dental  Outnts, 
Surgical  Outfits. 


1899 

iy?:TT: 


Daart.filiirj:,. 


I  bag  to  return  herewith  communication  enclosed  in 
your  favor  of  the  S6th  inst.  '  This  matter  will  receive  my  best 
attention,  and  I  will. be  glad  to  forward  the  information  desired. 
Thanking  you  for  your  kindness,  I  am, 


Very  truly  yours, 


[ENCLOSURE  (TRANSLATION)] 


*2/  ptiesheat.  /tsou>~£v  <ru  '£***£ Mirtu,  ’ 


0^.  <■  ^  (£a£oJsUs»**s-< 

As^&aJULsS,  //h'eMUsC0^[‘  %*sCtHs*-g--'  Ju ru/-^~ 
^u&f~~’  4-aAstO  cyytAkXsaJ^&si^t?  c^  jfazs 

OsisutCs'  osfsjCo  —  i 

CksHyeC  Cl&*-*  0^  ^L-fs&tdsV  *  Osud  ’&>' - 

0fa><ss+wrf~ (fn 

yi&Xr  *t  &k<5 

£0s^UUL^s  «  AmtuZ^V^U^ 

2^-  £*z4As&-(J  Os*  d  ?utv-e£^y 


<y 


fU^uuci^  !  -d**'  f 


[ENCLOSURE] 


— J 

A<*/*6  e^Hui/  Ci^EeX^ 


Am  Centrnl-Bahnhof  „Friedrichstrasso“. 


<a 13ez&t,  c/en.. 1.2.th  Oct , . 1899, 


W.  E  Gilmore,  Esq., 

General  Manager  Edison  Labaratory 
Orange,  New  Jersey. 


My  dear  Mr,  Gilmore: - 

I  beg  to  acknowledge  receipt  of  your  kind  favors  and  note  what 
you  say. about  the  Paris  party  and  I  can  only  say  that  I  was  decidedly 
disappointed  in  the. man  after  close,  acquaintance  with  his  methods. .To 
speak  candidly  I  think  he  is  troubled  with  a  bad  case  of  caraniuxPen- 
largement  and  is  inclined  to  give  vent  to  visionary  delusions.  His  prin¬ 
cipal  ambition. and  what  he  considers  as  essential  to  successful  commer¬ 
cial  business  is  in  fitting  up  a  small  machine  shop  in  which  he  devotes 
his  time  and  at  the  same  time  refusing  to  let  his  co-partners  have  any- 
thing  to  do  with  the  business  or  to  employ  any  one  who  might  be  of  use  in 
a  commercial  way.  Before  I  left  I  plainly  conveyed' to  him  in  a  diplo¬ 
matic  way  ray  impressions.  I  was  much  surprised  to  find  that  he  has  quite 
a  stock  of  castings  for  the  different  types  of  machines,  and  that  he  has 
in  stock  35  crude  Concert  machines,  they  are  really  disgraceful  speci¬ 
mens  of  workmanship.  The  castings  are  rough  and  unfinished,  in  fact  they 
look  as  if  they  v/ere  made  by  a  blacksmith*  and  the  one  I  heard  was  very 
defective  in  operation.  However  again  to  the  business  part  I  am  in  hopes 
that  he  will  awake  to  the. necessities  of  the  moment  and  alter  his  methods. 
As  you  will  have  been  advised  in  previous  letters  I  now  have  good  represen¬ 
tatives  working  in  Russia,  Austria  and  Germany.  The  German  people  are 
good  hustlers,  they  are  now  advertising  very  extensively  and  are  receiving 
notices  in  the  different  local  papers;  2  of  which  I  enclose.  They  are  doing 
a  very  nice  business  now  and  are  practically  sold  out  of  everything.  I 
have  ordered  some  goods  from  Paris  to  help  them  out  temporarily,  and  I 


factured  in  Germany,  but,  the* greater  parCware  made  in  America;,  and., the, . . 

^Patents ,-Vfer e-; declared’, 070 id.,,;  -I.am^alsdid^onried^that^sl{6'uid’'ari''act,i'or(  belr“1,'J 
tibrouEht  they  .Wi fcth !  &  Co',  in.  their  6TO,’?naffl’e.',canr,hr’incr*"flhmit''7s/qin' t  fnr 


^ibroughtjthey  .Wi'fethi&'Co.  in.'their  6vm,?naffie,',canr  bringu"about'';S-''sui t  for  , 
annul  Intent ,  wife.  Patents  on  the  above  point  lit  a  cost  of'Mk.300.-  or  $76." 

I  v/ill  send  you  unda^r>js^pap^t^.,jpovejr;iall<|^Ji|e(,!3er(yan  Patents  as  well  as  the 
abstract  above  referred  to.  i  am" to  "see  Wirth  &  Co.  again  today,  as  they 
are  investigating  the  various  Patents  in  the  Patent  Office.  It  is  indeed 
quite  a  relief,  to  talk  with  intelligent  lawyers,  as  the  2  I  previously 
consulted  knew  less  about  the  business  than  myself.  Patents  in  this 
country  run  for*15«yesfrs  from  the  date  of  Application  and  not  from  date 
of  Registration  by  the  Government  and  an  addition  or  improvement  to  a 
master  Patent  expires  with  the  master. 

As  to  the  Prescott  matter  I  have  been  thoroughly  convinced  for 
a  long  time  that  the  fellow  is  crazy,  and  I  have  not  taken  enough  interest 
in  the  matter  to  read  the  interesting  document.  I  am  glad  to  hear  that 
Walter  is  handling  the  business  all  right.  Mr.  Be rgmann  sends  his  kin¬ 
dest  regards  to  Mr.  Edison  and  yourself, nhe  has  been  of  considerable 
service  to  me  and  seemed  to  take  pleasure  in  it.  He  has  a  splendid  fac¬ 
tory  here, employing  over  a  thousand  hands,  and  has  more  work  than  can  be 
attended  to,  he  is  turning  out  splendid  dynamos  and  motors,  and  his 
business  is  increasing  so  rapidly,  that  he  has  found  it  necessary  to 
construct  another  new  factory.  His  factory  in  run  on  the  American  plan 
as  tofWurs  and  Piecework,  and  consequently  is  turning  out  apparatus  very 
cheaply.  . 

I  trust  that  this  will  find  you  enjoying  your  usual  good  health 
and  with  kindest  regards  to  Mr.  Edison,  yourself  and  John, 


I  c 


Yours  very  truly 


Am  Centrd^ali|^i(||,-YFriedi4chstrasse‘‘. 


W.  E.  Gilmore,  Esq., 


on 


General  Manager  the  Edison’ Labaratory, 
Orange,  New  Jersey.  * 
y  dear  Mr.  Gilmove:- 


y«,13tii  Oct.  1899. 


Mnioe  ..  *  pending  you  under  separate  cover  the  Patents  i.e.the 

+  £»+iepn?f  +he1ol^ntsJrcrnAoed  to  in  a  Previous  letter.  You  will  notice 
SepLf  1f0cL^Sd  05008  "*  void-  Patent  12631  has  been  void  since 
These^frtftnl1^5?^08  fln°e  1894’  as+n0  taxes  were  paid  on  either  Patents, 
i  e  ^tollwerk**  Pat  nts  were  never  transferred  to  the  Deutsche  Edison, 


Yours  very  truly 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO.. 


135  FIFTH  AVENUE, 
Corner  a!  20th  Street. 


NEW  YORK. 


NEW  YORK  Oot.  16,  1899. 
. 0.  H.  W. . 


flow  England  Phono.  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 

Dear  Slrs:- 

On  and  after  November  1st,  the  list  price  of  Edison  Concert 
Phonographs  will  be  $100.00,  Edison  Concert  slot  Phonographs  $150.00,  and 
Edison  Concert  Records  $2.50  each,  subject  to  same  discounts  as  now 
quoted. 

We  give  you  this  advance  notice  that  you  may  put  forth  extra 
efforts  to  dispose  of  your  present  stock,  before  reduction  in  price  takes 
effect. 


All  orders  shipped  prior  to  November  1st  will  be  invoiced  at 
present  prices;  those  shipped  after  that  date  at  the  new  prices. 

Order  for  immediate  shipment  to  meet  your  actual  requirements 


only. 

Anticipate  your  future  wants  arid  place  your  orders  for  future 
delivery  at  once. 


Yours  very  truly | 

NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  COMPANY, 


.OAVEREL  PARIS 


FREDK.  D’A.  QOOLD 

54,  Faubourg  Saint-Honor6 

i  17-th..  Gct-./99_ . 

-gsrj*”*1*  i  :  q(';ii  -  j 


National  Phonograph  Co’,s 
Gbnuinh  Ambimcan  Apparatus 


Kikktoscopbs 


My  dear  Gilmore: 

I  suppose  you  are  aware  that  our  friend 
Bettini  is  at  present  sojourning  in  Paris, 
and  you  know  probably  that  he  came  over  with  the 
intention  of  trying  to  form  a  Company;  but  it  way 
be  news  to  you  that  he  has  succeeded,  as  per  the 
enclosed. 


Perhaps  I  had  better  say  that  he  has  "almost " 
succeeded  ,  as  they  are  trying  now  to  float  the 
Company  and  get  the  Capital  subscribed. 

You  will  notice  in  their  subscription  list  that  they  are 
forming  a  Company  for  "Apparatus  Bettini  &  Edison." 

What  right  have  they  to  use  the  word  "Edison?"  I  think  that 
Edison's  name  ought  to  be  withdrawn,  or  rather  that  he  should  not 
allow  his  name  to  be  used  so  freely.  Every  little  petty-fogging 
place  which  sells  any  kind  of  talking  machine  is  a  "Maison  Edison." 

Referring  to  3ettini  &  Co.  again  -  the  employment  of  the 
Capital  I  think  you  will  d'dini-Ve  a  go  od  deal  of  amusement  from. 

I  have  marked  in  the  margin  roughly  the  figures  which  are  allowed 
and  the  Machines  which  they  are  putting  down.  You  see  they  are 
going  to  make  Records,  and  their  Pianos  must  be  first-cldss  as 
they  pay  $500  a  piece  for  them. 


TWO  AMERICAN  CABLES  FROM  NEW  YORK  TO  GREAT  BRITAIN. 
CONNECTS  also  with  FOUR  ANCLO-AMER1CAN  and  ONE  DIRECT  U.  S.  ATLANTIC  CABLES. 

DIRECT  CABLE  COMMUNICATION  WITH  CERMANY  AND  FRANCE. 

CABLE  CONNECTION  with  CUBA, WEST  INDIES,  MEXICO  CENTRAL  andSOUTH  AMERICA. 

MESSAGES  SENT  TO,  AND  RECEIVED  FROM,  ALL  PARTS  OF  THE  WORLD. 

OPPIOBS  X3XT  AMERICA! 

All  Offices  (20,000)  of  the  Western  Union  Telegraph  Company  and  its  Connections.  ' 


mcyvT  buxtaikt:  ^  2° 

LIVERPOOL :  AB  Exchange  Buildings. 


Am  Centrnl;'Bahivhqi\yi?rie(ii'iQhstrasse,<. 

(  Oi'l,  NiCHSfiJ)  | 

L A  . dm .S.O.t.h....O.Q.t,...J,899,.. . 

W.  E.  Gilmore,  Esq.,  General  Manager 
Edison  Laboratpry, 

Orange,  New  Jersey.  U.S.A. 

%  dear  Mr.  Gilmore, 

Tour  kind  letter  of  the  2nd  is  received,  and  I  am  very 
glad  that  you  found  time  to  write  me  so  fully  on  the  different  subjects. 

I  have  not  seen  the  London  parties  a  second  time,  and  have  therefore 
nothing  further  to  report.  I  cabled  you  today  „to  the  effect  that  I  quo¬ 
ted  them  40  and  10  on  Phonos,  excepting  Genisx40%  on  Gemsj50  &  5  on  Re¬ 
cords  and  Blanks,  excepting  Concerts,  and  40  and  5  on  Concert,  Records 
&  Blanks,  all  f.o.h.  Southampton.  I  note  what  you  say  about  the  new  Gem, 
and  I  await,  with  interest  the  arrival  of  sample.  I  am  very  glad  to  hear 
that  business  is  booming,  and  trust  that  it  may  continue  to  do  so.  The 
German  Co.  did  serve  notice  on  the  Columbia  Co.,  but  that  was  all  there’ 
v/as  of  it.  Columbia  have  opened  another  store  on  Friedrichstrasse,  you 
can  therefore  see  that  they  are  here  for  business,  and  in  this  connec¬ 


tion  I  am  thoroughly  convinced  that  a  branch  of  myr  business  should  be 


"'fflermanently  establ'i'sli^d  with  either  imyseifi6r  :Bro'ther  in  chatgey^ 

i-  asi  Berlin  is  the  Nev/  York  of  Europe  and  is  the  head-quarters  for'alT"  w  ’■ 
0EHroppan  merchants.  T^«g^iT^p^eth'er.,^ift^dtha,.£r.e'e:.port  ai,  Hamburg  "  ’  ’ 
maiKps^it;  an  idea!  business’’ .center,' : art.d  it.-i.s  possible  fromithis  point 
,?£p  keep- dr.  touch  v/ith;> Europe  and  .  the  East'.  .Rents’  are  very  reasonable  : 

■-  here  [and,:it  -is .necessary  that  a  smal’l.-.Record -  making’  plantbe  ’-.establ i  shfe'd" 
^t.pllina1ce  i'German>  French^  vRussian,  -  and  :ltalran:  <v6cal:i:Remords,'fvas?v/e  are 
seriously  handicapped?  in  this  respect' ' at  t!hV. present  - tiraev.AOf  course 


your  instrumental  PeoQKd?{;fi!lli^heil.,b^l;!i;n..itll3£^  (iyne.  The  competition  is 
now  very  fierce  in  Europe  and  from  the  aggressive  stand  taken  by  our 
chief  competitors, .^ij^is  absolutely  necessary  that  we  too  must  be  ag¬ 
gressive  and  endeavour  to  meet  conditions  as  they  exist.  An  office  here 

could  take  care  of  the  business  in  Europe  and  the  East,  v/hile  the  New- 
Ajl 

York  end^votes  its  attention  to  the  South  American,  Mexican  and  the 
Southern  Colony  business;with  an  Office  here  it  would  be  possible  to 
exploit  the  full  line  of  Edison  Apparatus,  and  th  place  promptly  on  the 
market  such  new  Apparatus  as  may  appear.  Labor  is  very  cheap  here  and  a 
Branch  could  be  run  at  a  very  moderate  expense.  All  concerns  of  any  re¬ 
putation  in  the  States  have  Branch  offices. here^ apd  there  are  more 
Americans  located  here  permanently  than  in  cSdfeary^larger  cities  in 
Europe  put  together.  I  have  studied  the  situation  very  carefully  in  Eu¬ 
rope  and  the  deductions  above  are  in  my  mind  practical  and  necessary, and 
I  will  be  glad  to  have  your  comment.  I  have  written  Goold  today  that  the 
further  carrying  of  goods  on  consignments  in  bond  at  Antwerp  is  imprac¬ 
tical,  and  requesting  him  to  kindly  place  orders  in  a  firm  way  for  Such 
goods  as  he  may  desire  at  this  point,  as  I  have  found,  taking  into  con¬ 
sideration  the  liberal  discount  of  which  we  are  supplying  him,  that  there 
is  no  profit  for  me  in  this  mode  of  doing  business,  as  in  the  end 


e  ^ sputes -about  freight'  chargesj-.stbrage,'  insurance;"  and- ,'’'lcr" 

transportation  charges  from  the-steamer  to  the  Custom  House  and'-Vlbi^ 
'^ersa,  furthermore  as.  .tijaiprppriilii  pent-  iOftgoods ;  from  these  points-'''™-'"’'’ 
depends  solely  upon  t|e;  acq  itsy  o?  the  forwarding  age  it--,  all  kinds  of' 
’mistakes  are  liable  to’ occur,  that  will  require  adjustement'  at  consideo- 
allo  expense.  I  n'eyer  was' .very  much  ir.  love  with  consignment  business',  ' 
0?P.d  ^trbiliKithat;  you’.; will  agree  T/i.th.;me,  from- your  experience. ! I  expected 
to  be  in  Kopenhagen  before,  .this*  but- have  been  aetained  some  few  days 
in  interesting^ffianuf^cturjw^.;agen,ti,,.,wh1o|).is|,ltp(.travel  extensively  in  the 
East, 


1  trust ^th^  this  will  find  you  enjoying  good  health  and  with 


Kindly  present  my  respects  to  Mr.  Edison. 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO., 

EDISON  LABORATORY, 


ORANGEoctober  23,-'  1899 


COPY 


Chas.  H.  Patrick,  Esq. , 

c/o  Cuthbert,  Menzies  &  Co., 

25  Pine  St.,  New  York. 

Dear  Sir:- 

Vfe  write  to  advise  that  the  material  called  for  on  order  #473, 
Edison  Bell  Consolidated  Phono.  Corp.  Ltd.,  and  also  the  extra  parts, 
of  which  you  send  us  a  typewritten  list,  has  go ne  forward  with  the 
following  exceptions: 


The  item  of  100  Governor  Pinions  has  been  filled  by  shipping 
100  Governor  Shafts  and  Pinions  assembled. 

The  25  Governor  Shafts  we  have  cancelled.  This  is  due  to  the 
fact  that  the  pinions  are  cut  after  they  are  forced  on  the  shaft  and 
it  is  therefore  impossible  to  furnish  them  un-assembled. 

Will  you  kindly  convey  this  information  to  the  Edison  Bell 
Consolidated  Phono.  Corp.  Ltd.,  and  oblige. 

Yours  very  truly. 


JRS/CHS 


[ENCLOSURE] 


~7&-i^J/2) .  Q&ij£'&Tyt>  Or^*tX „</0  -/t  *  rS, 

T— 

cJ^y^'-e^  _  x6^^-9^^^J2^-'  oCoa^Cl.^,  _  _  , 


'<~JUL.  &(^<^^^'/^r--lst  Ut-'^JiL, 

//^  a  >cL  '&L&^  ^ 

^r<s 

/tStsdltCjlj^  ch--Tf-T>7\ 

OT-ct^t'-u^y  -Tt^e^iAy-, 

/6 

<* 

Vir@LyfcZt,o'  cZUo.  ' 


[ENCLOSURE] 


vJLojk.  on-o_^  /vu>  ^U^UiUZv 

>-^nr  avia^-  «Laal/ia^.  /Ot^-^—Po 

e»-^  *-$  julckj^.  -ttw  Trijui*.  - 

'rr&.n^j  -^.(ha/  e-ct*^  ^6"  ^ 

-C^vUsXkstj^  OTrvC*,rt>i^U«_i-  -LCCCc-X^  J\JL4A~LAj4,)h>  *-|I^-T^cO 
Xc  cl  cuj,  '-(Ln*nsii<^(j  >Xi,/uut/  (  •'VT'-^aa^L 

C^A_y  eO$jO  -iamac^. - 

/3  /lA^-tx-  -L>\a<-aA_<i  C»_(£^.A,<l--L.yA  ^v^-a-^_«_.  /J^tu^JiJLvi 

aaaa~<L«a>-'  'Vi'oMy  "-(^-o-i  HUaaa— -  ^ 

^AA^AMt/A/Ccj,  ^  A^A*-^-cn.-vW^CL^.l  'Vv'-&^_t^R-.  A^t"  '~^aaX<cWa^' 
'^H'-IACAAmA-'  0^j^.JO-6*AAA^b  'YV,^  tc£-Sy  CLcA^O-^bhi^A-- 

*L<  '"^'*■'*-‘-^"7'^  ,  cvam-5—  szsfco*-.Q — 

0-A—  -TA-v^/  .|3<^a>  ttAol  a-tAAivj  '^-eAAA-^''-’  *• 

fi.4(AA-<!LC^(_-’  &aa-T  -  -  -^tr-vA-v-A-T^r-  'Yt'^cS—  '-^aamaj 

AAA.  nXC-  ^AAj.  •  XtutUAHTr^ 

*t*  a-iX  •fcw-  /^<xaJa3t~-^Laa_  ^ix^Lf '~ryci-^l  ® 


'•  JXifrizz  '•  "Sif  ii 


'"RaaI  sy-Y-a^^S  - 

- - -  — VVL. — (C 

-2T 


AW*.  AAA_tX«-^CAAA|  <t^yi_i^-  —{Laa^  e^hvLAJt^AAAUAtAX) 

crrcO^-  '^j-o-r  ca^^maa-  '^XL^^vvL  a-^3Jvaa^  a^l*^  ^ 
cLaaaJ?  «^^Xma-va-  jt  a  ff  ,  »  .  >yV'c<-fitAA^' 

OA)  etc  cLa_^  <v^jfc-c~^v_  '  ■,  '''■  • v  •  ••••••  •  ■•> 

(3^  fl/V/LyA"  <lXa-o  '-'Rajaa^)  ACM  AV1M/ - '  CA-  ffAJ-^lAA''  •O^-AIAAAAA 

cAtX^e.^/-^,  -f/c^CiA  XtsfcUA^y:  .  ■  '  ® 


<3  -&JuL^-*l-  'cj/*_st  wAi^ti  ■  < 

*'  <^cr\^tA-^.  -'LaJC 

£lL^^C/<Pf 

iA^t*  <A-«-^—)  "^-rV0  -^e-r*—  •  .— 

v$—t^ 


'jSLsf~X^^  }  cooi«->s 

— -r 

,  ^-P^,  _ 


•'PU/tC  .  <J— y 


+xJLjir  >.  (3  <*-£A*cL«-  '<&-« 


•  ,.,  j*  J/jjQt  <''' — V.'1  •‘*7^  ■  1  i 

€l''';'-/(~yirc  J-^  #>)  (®*.  ^ 

cc  cCoajA 

'-^_»AW1—  ^vv  ‘ 

C^lnMCAAttA^vtAl - ,  ^^LyiM^VcJL^  '^~^CLAAA^te^CxA>^A_£IAc^«^'  ’ 

c-^-^'  ,  -t-A*  CjjvlAAXl - ^?_^CA_A^^.«^6-flA_  ^to  •  ^a_C_£ - ;  j 

'^\A-«AAAMm;^  OC-*^AA>LJ!A»lti''  ^G,  C^eJ?~  CKj.  ;>^«y<'  ^^A>C^5  j 

^  icto  xc  fB^«uLi  ^ '  ^h^c 

•-  •  ^  /^f^°r  ,^7?^ 


[ENCLOSURE] 


|  juft*  Q)~Lsdu^  jA-  -yJoJr  ^.  _ _ 

'  o-v"x~"  ^yy-%^x — OTwiX^wJt'  Qv 

•^1/iAu*-'.  0-r"<J_£'v-^  *•  g«  ■<*- 


I  ___  ^  _ _ _ 

I  (SL-0  «-^“=c£ja 

t  O'Vit^C  (^ha-xO 

|  j?T"fLc--  |l^,je^ix-< —  —  ••&'&—•  w<jo _e^~ nJL»— -  o~v^—^ckjt. 
I  A/L\.a^y^~  ^  ctxc^/  iJL'- 

I  n  "/t°  CCxxI<l 

cKJ^JL^ 


Jyv^  ZXXJ- 


-  *  -  %^4U 


[ENCLOSURE] 


FREDK.  D’A.  GOOLD 

54,  Faubourg  Saint-Honord 

S^aiis,  Stance. . 20th . 0ct./99- 

C.  E.  St  evens  Esq., 

82.  Ritterstrasse, 

BERLIN. 

Dear  Sir: 

I  beg  to  acknowledge,  receipt  of  your  two 
cablegrams,  as  per  enclosed  copies,  and  in  reply 
beg  to  say  that  I  have  forwarded  you  the  four 
Code  books  asked  for. 

You  ask  in  your  second  cable  -  "Why  more 
"goods  on  consignment?" 

Because  I  need  them  for  my  business. 

There  seems  to  be  some  little  mistake  floating  around  in 
your  mind  about  my  arrangements  here.  It  might  be  as  well  if 
I  were  to  endeavour  to  throw  some  light  upon  it  and  clear  it  up 
from  my  point  of  view. 

My  arrangements  for  representing  the  Edison  interests  in 
Prance  were  made  personally  aid  directly  with  Mr.  Edison  and 
Mr.  Gilmore,  and  I  recognise  no  one’s  right  outside  of  these  two 
people  to  question  my  orders  or  my  way  of  doing  business. 

That  my  orders  go  through  your  office  in  New  York,  must  not 
lead  you  to  suppose  that  this  is  a  Branch  of  that  place. 

I  am  entirely  free  and  independent  here,  and  as  I  said  before, 
will  not  brook  interference  in  my  business  from  anyone  save  and 
except  Mr.  Edison  or  Mr.  Gilmore. 


Stevens  Esq.,  Berlin. 


It  is  possible  in  the  hurry  of  leaving  you  did  not  make 
yourself  fully  aware  of  the  arrangement s  then  existing. 

Whilst  I  shall  be  pleased  at  any  time  to  assist  you  in  any 
way  of  business,  and  meet  you  socially  with  every  good  feeling, 
you  must  understand  that  there  are  timeB  that  I  do  not  brook 
interference  or  give  explanations  where  none  are  necessary. 

STOCK  AT  ANTWERP:  Please  let  me  have  full  list  of  stock  now  at 
Antwerp,  and  notify  me  if  you  are  drawing  from  it. 


1  Enclosure. 


national  PHONOGRAPH  CO.. 


NEW  YORK  October  34th,  1899 


LIST  OF  SUSPENDED  DEALERS 
Superseding  all  previous  lists. 

N.  Y. ,  New  York— F.  M.  Prescott,  44  Broad  St.,  New  York 

"IT^.X^ls^he^  either  in 

SambornastW,CChioa|o  **£?”*>  N‘  City  &  167  Dear- 
EagN.  Yh0n°graPh  C°-'  °r  Bowenthal,  83  Nassau  St., 
Empire  Phonograph  Co.,  3  West  14th  St  w  v 
Union  Office  Supply  Co.,  si  Nas^u  St  ,'  N.'  Y.’  °ity' 
nark  Row  Bl0y°le  Co.,  33  Park  Row  N  Y 
E  H  °V  N-  Y-  City  and  Chicago,  in! 

H.  H.  Macy  Co. ,  New  York  City. 

s'  Wo5ld  B«ilding,  New  York  City 

S.  Lemberg  &  Co.,  I94  Broadway,  New  York  City' 

3«.»"'.Y°X'  0",*""*“”  *>•.  106  Vail 

“3.;  "■■<>**  »•  V.,  also.  Phil.- 

Brookport — Jacob  Popp,  Brockport,  N  Y 
Brooklyn  Wm.  Staats,  499  Flushing  Ave . ,  Brooklyn  L  I 
p  T  _  ,  ,  Matthews  Bros.,  Fulton  St.,  Brooklyn  L  I* 

R.  I.,  Providence — F.  P.  Moore,  Providence,  R.  I.  Y  ' 

The  Arcade  Co.,  Providenoe,  R.  1. 

Williams  &  Rankin,  Providenoe,  R.  1. 

Allen  Co.,  Providenoe,  R.  I. 

Newport— Neil  McLennon,  196  Thomas  St.,  Newooi-t  p  t 
Conn.,  Hartford— Sawyer  Dry  Goods  Co.,  Hartford  Conn  ‘  ' 

Mass.,  Fall  River — The  Foster  Co.,  Fall  River  Mass 

Penn.,  Philadelphia-Hawthorne  &  Sheble,  604  Chestnut ‘st.  Phila  pa 

Esohers  jKusio  Store,  1343  Grand  Ave  pm1d  '  l 
Soranton— Scranton  Novelty  Co  ,  Scranton,  PaJ  "  PhU  '  Pa> 

K.  A.  Weiohell,  Scranton,  Pa. 

Tur  1 1  e^  r  e  ek  Rob^r  I^Hi^l  i  ^  lkensburg*  ^  Wi  lme  r  dJLng°n  Pa^' 

N.  ^fpater^nZchar  H  ilinlf'  pft 

Wis.,  Milwaukee-Philip  Kalt,  445  East  Water  St.,  Wis. 

SUPPLY  ANY ^/“tHE^E  “dEALE^^ITH  OTR  APPA^VTUB  MUTUAL  G°°D’  by  refuaing  t° 
nowledgment  .ill  „  lhst  yo 

NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO., 

C.  H.  WILSON, 

Manager  of  Sales. 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO., 


136  FIFTH  AVENUE, 
Corner  of  20th  Street. 


to  NEW  YORK. 


New  England  Phono  Co. 

120  Tremont  St.,  Boston,  Mass. 
Dear  Sirs:- 


We  are  about  to  issue  a  oomplete  and  up-to-date  Hand¬ 
book  of  the  Phonograph;  table  of  contents  on  page  47  of  # 77 
reoord  list  enclosed.  It  will  oontain  about  150  pages,  good 
paper,  clear  type,  and  is  bound  in  buckram  with  stiff  covers. 

It  tells  the  tale  of  the  Phonograph,  both  past  and  present.  It 
gives  a  history  of  the  events  that  lea  up  to  the  invention,  the 
story  of  the  invention  itself,  and  desoribes  the  perfected 
Phonograph  of  to-day.  It  is  illustrated  wherever  the  text  calls 
for  a  piotured  interpretation.  It  contains  also  a  re-print  of 
the  Openeer  Papers,  demonstrating  the  pleasures  of  Phonograph 
ownership,  and  the  various  uses  to  whioh  the  PHONOGRAPH  may  be 
applied. 

IT  WILL  RETAIL  for  $1.00;  discount-  to  the  trade,  33  1-3#. 

AN  ADVANCE  ORDER  for  20  oopies  oarries  with  it  an  extra 
oash  discount  of  10#.  The  Advance  Order  Discount  will  be  with¬ 
drawn  after  first  shipments  of  advance  orders  are  made.  For  an 
advance  Order  for  100  oopies,  in  addition  to  this  oash  discount, 
we  will  print  on  the  title  page  in  red,  "100  oopies  imprinted 
expressly  for  (your  name)." 

YOUR  EARLY  ORDERS  will  insure  prompt  attention. 

Yours  truly, 

NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO. 

C.  H.  Wilson, 

Manager  of  Sales. 

P.S.  The  price  on  #77  reoord  lists,  with  your  imprint,  is  our 
cost;  $10.00  per  1,000.  In  lots  of  2,000  or  over,  we  bill  them 
at  HALF  COST,  i.e.,  $5.00  per  1,000. 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO., 

EDISON  LABORATORY, 
ORANCE,  N.  J. 


ORANGE  10-26  1899 


COPY 


C.  H  Patl'iok,  Esq.  , 

25  Pina  St.,  N.  Y. 

Pear  Sir:- 

V.re  have  shipped  to  yon  the  following  attachments,  which  are 
to  he  used  for  making  records: 

6  Diaphragms,  or  Recorders 

1  Special  Concert  Arm 

1  Special  Regular  Arm 

The  special  arms  can  be  attached  to  the  standard  back-rod 
sleeves.  I  understand  that  there  was  but  one  device  for  attaching  the 
horn  and  for  holding  the  recorder  sent  you.  This,  however,  is  lnter- 
changable  and  can  be  used  on  either  the  Concert  bracket  or  arm  of  the 
regular  bracket  or  arm.  The  operator  can  very  readily  see  how  the 
diaphragm  or  recorder  is  connected  to  this  special  device  or  top,  as  we 
sometimes  call  it.  You  can  also  transmit  the  following  general  direc¬ 
tions  to  your  people; 

The  top  is  so  arranged  that  it  can  slide  up  or  down  on  the  arm 
or  bracket,  thus  making  the  recorder  hang  horizontally  or  perpendicular¬ 
ly  and  thereby  whanging  the  angle  of  the  needle  or  recording  sapphire. 

No  fixed  position  can  be  given  for  the  diaphragm;  it  will  have  to  be 
adjusted  according  to  the  results  obtained  from  each  individual  operator. 
You  will  also  note  that  there  are  some  copper  washers  stuck  to  the  top 
of  the  diaphragm.  These  washers  are  added  as  weights,  so  as  to  make 
the  recorder  cut  more  deeply.  This  is  also  another  point  on  which  no 


given  instructions  can  be  sent.  The  amount  of  weight  necessary  will  he 
determined  by  experiment  and  will  depend  upon  the  same  conditions  as 
enumerated  with  respect  to  the  horizontal  and  perpendicular  position. 
They  will  also  discover  that  as  more  weight  is  used  there  will  result 
more  scratching  or  grating  in  the  recording.  When  this  becomes  too 
pronounced  it  will  be  necessary  to  reduce  the  weight  on  the  diaphragm; 
that  is,  remove  the  washers. 

We  think  that  these  few  remarks  will  enable  you  to  obtain 
satisfactory  results. 


Yours  very  truly 


jRs/im 


yc^y  tiL 


'-fCeytjey  acacaO-  oaa<a  ^ 

syC^O^S  Oty  s/k-a^a&Ca^  '^Q^L^SLy^^y.CZy'  &la%)  '"* 

aHa^-  )/bsi*riJ  '^r^0^)  O^TtajCCj 


(gttsocy  (ZAlAUAytA^  ~ 


jKu^ex  . 

y^ATzzeyn^c/ 


APtAytAAX  @A7^LAs y  * 

jL'  ^^yyyy  *y  nsfi^cs 
(§^fyyx<!^yAyC^y^  AT^AAiAuyttytA' 

9y<m^y.  t&yyC  VuLl£. 


tfyy  rKtyJC  M *  a&W j  asoty(y 


&  Qy^tyi^CilZ^Ci^  77'^CrfZ' 

/z^ut^cy  y^yy{^^  '~^^Ayc%yzd( 

X^iT-lVCyey  yC/ZA^Ay  (y6Xo<Lys<ZyCty  fCty(y^7Sf 

ci?  >  _  7T-^~ 


£v  KyZy  l&Aty^J^Ly^Ay'  (^C^C^^y 

<%y~st£u^  yCey^^yZlzy  J)(uaX  "ytcs 
@to*yjztfL~-'  cza^aCa  '^Jw-od  ~^Ca  >^iaJZAa^\ 
zy^ystsutyy  9tajCO  ^f.  ^tZyycJyty 
AjiAyyoUy  yoo  ^C£jy  ^MyyuAjy 
(2/n<yttA4£r  -£^L  ^!ouA<yyy  * 

@y  je^QjzyX^  aU  yCc<uytr 
yiz^C^cuzy(yy2y  yyy z^a^zaa^a  ' 
(L^At^A^Lty  ^^^UzyyyCz —  ^ 

cizy' yyuy&AtS  ^y^cUyypCJ  ^ ,  ~ZaZaa 


pOjuza/^ 

'^/Zl6Aa  'T^CaAa 


(iSfctAXh  ^ifyAy  HL^AAC 
S^yy  (^yy£yAAA  -yi 
TryyOCeyc^  ^A2<yyz 
zH&t  sjC 


&-4yC-^^A 


'*'</%. ^yyyiy^AAAA^ 

/Tyty^  AZAAA-AA^  @yAlA?yCs  ^ 

Cyoyyt^y&Ayyt# 


[ENCLOSURE] 


GOAVEREL  PARIS 


FREDK.  D’A.  GOOLD 

54,  Faubourg-  Saint-HonorA 


0.  E.  Stevens  Esq. , 

82.  Ritterstrasse 

B  E  R  L(jUC 

My  dear  Sir 


<^Ws,  Stance - 26th_Qct,_/99  JJ' 

j(/H  (i 

V'  JiyZjh’-' 


Genuine  American  Apparatus 


ra  favored  with  yours  of  the  24th  inst.  and 
note  fully  what  you  say. 

I  was  certainly  latterly  under  the  impression 
that  there  must  be  some  mistake  as  to  your  informa- 
tion,  and  regret  that  under  these  circumstances 
any  friction  should  have  arisen  between  us. 

I  trust  that  for  the  future  we  shall  be  able 
to  jog  along  without  finding  the  road  too  narrow 
for  us  both  to  travel  in  the  same  pathway.  And, 
ny  other  letter,  I  am  at  all  times  only  too  glad  and 
willing  to  be  of  any  assistance  to  you  over  here  when  I  can. 

Anything  that  I  have  said  or  written  must  be  taken  from  a 
purely  business  point  of  view,  as  X  have  no  personal  feelings  of 
animosity  in  the  matter. 

LETTERS:  I  beg  to  advise  you  that  I  re-registered  one  letter  to  you 
to-day,  and  now  enclose  you  another,  which  I  trust  you  will  get  in 
due  course. 

Trusting  that  you  are  doing  the  large  business  which  you  an¬ 
ticipated. 


I  am. 


My  Dear  Gilmore: 


Plh&n . 


HAYES  A  LAMBERT, 


•  )£sLi^ X- 


Wl'' 

NEWARK,  N.  J.,  Qulir-TM:,  1899. 


I  enclose  sane  draft  letters  that  may  do  some¬ 
thing  to  meet  the  situation  in  the  British  Colonies.  If  representa¬ 
tives  of  the  Edison  Bell  people  are  here  it  would  do  no  harm  to 
take  up  with  them  my  letter  to  T.  A.  E.  and  draft  of  letter  from 
the  Works  to  the  English  Company.  If  they  will  not  fight  the  graph- 
ophone  it  will  help  business  a  good  deal  to  get  their  local  counsel 
(or  our  own)  to  stir  up  dealers  in  graphophones  with  letters  and, 
if  necessary (Start  some  suits  on  the  English  patents  .  If  the  Edi- 
son-Bell  will  not  permit  them  to  be  brou^vt  in  their  name  the  Works 
could  bring  them  in  their  own  name  or  would  have  the  right  to  ubs 
the  Edison  Bell  name  even  without  their  permission.  1  think  it 
would  be  well  for  Edison  to  answer  Lane'B  letter  personally  as  in¬ 


dicated. 


Yours 

1'-’  v 

Win.  E.  Gilmore  Esq., 

National  Phonograph  Co., 

'  Orange,  N.  J. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Nov.  2,  1899 

Draft  of  letter  from  Mr.  Ediscm  to  William  H«  H.  Lane. 

Dear  Sir: 

I  am  in  receipt  of  your  favor  of  June  21st  last  and  in 
reply  would  thank  you  for  the  trouble  you  have  taken  and  the  infor¬ 
mation  you  have  afforded  me,  I  will  place  the  matter  you  refer  to 
before  the  oanpanieB  interested  in  the  manufacture  and  sale  of 
Phonographs  and  supplies  in  Australia.  In  the  meantime,  I  would 
deem  it  a  favor  if  you  would  give  me  further  information  as  to  the 
doings  of  the  Columbia  Phonograph  Co.  of  which  you  speak.  Can  you 
get  and  send  me  one  of  the  letters  which  you  say  the  Columbia  Pho" 
nograph  Co.  gives  to  dealers,  stating  that  they  are  at  liberty  to 
sell  in  New  South  Wales  without  Patent  Litigation.  I  would  also 
like  very  much  to  know  the  names  and  addresses  of  the  firms  who  ad¬ 
vertise  that  those  buying  Columbia  Graphophones  will  thereby  avoid 
Patent  Litigation. 


Yours  truly, 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Draft  of  letter  from  E.  P.  W.  to  Edison  Bell  Co. 


y''  We  are  reliably  informed  that  throughout  Cape  Colony,  Austra¬ 
lia  and  New  Zealand  The  Columbia  Phonograph  Company  of  the  United 
States,  the  selling  a^nts  of  the  American  Graphophone  Company,  are 
openly  selling  graphophones  supplies  and  records  and  that  their 
representatives  advertise  that  purchasers  and  users  of  such  goods 
will  not  be  subject  to  patent  litigation.  As  you  know  we  are  equal 
ly  interested  with  you  in  this  field,  having  the  exclusive  right  to 
manufacture  both  phonographs  and  graphophones  for  use  there.  This 
unrestricted  sale  therefore  of  graphophones  and  supplies  in  viola¬ 
tion  of  the  patents  controlled  by  you  is  a  direct  injury  to  us. 

We  therefore  request  you  at  once  to  notify  all  suoh  violators  to 
stop  and,  on  their  failure  to  do  so,  to  begin  appropriate  legal 
proceedings  against  them.  On  your  failure  so  to  do  we  shall  hold 
you  liable  for  all  damages  and  will  feel  at  liberty  to  institute 
suoh  legal  proceedings  on  our  behalf  in  your  name, 


[ENCLOSURE] 


;  -  •  NEWARKfJJI.  J.t  Nov.  2,  1899 

Thomas  A.  Edison  Esq.,  '  j 

i  !■>’<■ 'J.-:.  !  Sfi<>  i 

Dear  Sir:  i  ! 

In  reply  to  your  inquiry-as'-'tb-'tKe  status  of  affairs 
in  the  British  Colonies  of  Cape  Colony,  Australia  and  New  Zealand, 
and  the  right  of  the  Columbia  Phonograph  Company  to  sell  grapho¬ 
phones  and  supplies  there,  and  what  remedy  the  Edis on  Phonograph 
Works  have  in  the  premises;  I  v/ould  say  that ’from  inquiries  I  have 
made  1  learn  that  the  Columbia  Phonograph  Company  as  general  sales 
agent  of  the  Co.  are  selling  large  quantities- <ff 

graphophones  and  supplies  in  those  Colonies  without  interference, 
and  advertise  that  they  have  a  perfect  right  so  to  do. 

This  is  of  course  a  serious  injury  to  the  Edison  Phonograph 
Works.  By  its  contract  with  the  Edison  United  Phonograph  Company 
The  Edison  Phonograph  Works  received  the  right  to  manufacture  both 
Phonographs  and  Graphophones  for  use  Abroad,  and  the  sale  of  these 
graphophones  which  compete  with  the  Phonograph  not  only  lessen  the 
number  of  phonographs  which  should  be  sold  by  the  English  Company, 
and  manufacture d/£or  it  by  the  Edison  Works,  but  also  deprive  the 
Works  of  the  profit  it  would  derive  from  the  manufacture  of  such 
graphophones.  The  relinquishment  by  the  Works  of  the  exclusive 
right  to  manufacture  phonographs  and  graphophones  in  Great  Britain 
and  Ireland  did  not  affect  its  right  in  the  British  Colonies  above 


[ENCLOSURE] 


mentioned*  Its  rights  there  remain  unimpaired. 

It  certainly  is  Hie  duty  of  the  Edison  Bell  Company  to  warn 
all  users  and  sellers  of  graphophones  in  those  Colonies  that  they 
are  infringing  the  patents  controlled  by  that  corporation,  and  on 
the  failure  of  such  infringe™  to  desist,  to  bring  suit  against  them* 
I  enclose  a  draft  of  a  letter  to  the  Edison  Bell  Co.,  requesting 
them  t©  perform  this  duty.  If  they  neglect  or  refhse  to  do  so,  the 
Works  may  undertake  to  prevent  this  illegal  use  and  sale  of  grapho- 
phone®,  and  in  a ny  litigation  rendered  necessary  to  protect  its 
rights  may  use  the  name  of  the  Edison  Bell  Phonograph  Company,  even 
without  their  permission. 


Yours  truly. 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO 


135  FIFTH  AVENUE, 

"r  new”  YORK. "'COMr 


N.  K.  Phono  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 

Gentlemen: - 

A  olrcular  notice  has  been  sent  out  to  the  trade  in  the 
State  of  Ohio  and  elsewhere  by  the  so-called  "Edison  Phonograph  Company" 
olaiming  to  be  the  exolusive  lipensee  under  the  phonograph  patents  of 
Thomas  A.  Edison,  warning  all  persons  ..using,  buying  or  selling  Edison 
Phonographs,  records  and  supplies  within  the  Btate  of  Ohio,  without 
its  consent,  that  they  hereby  render  themselves  liable  for  damages. 

In  the  notice  reference  is  also  made  to  litigation  pending  between 
James  L.  Andem  and  the  National' Phonograph  Co. 

While  as  a  rule  we  do  not  talce  any  notice  of  groundless  state¬ 
ments  of  this  j£ind,  we  deem  it  our  duty  in  this  case  to  save  our  custo¬ 
mers  from  annoyance  by  putting  them  in  possession  of  the  actual  faots. 
Neither  the  so-called  "Edson  Phonograph  Company" ,  nor  James  L.  Andem, 
has  any  exolusive  right  or  contraot  of  any  Sind  with  regard  to  phono¬ 
graphs  or  supplies,  and  cannot  in  any  way  interfere  with  the  full,  free 
and  unrestricted  use  and  sale  of  all  phonographs  apd  supplies  purchased 
from  us.  If  any  attempt  is  made  to  annoy  any  of  our  oustomers  by 
me£ns  of  legal  proceedings,  we  will  conduct  the  defense  of  any  Buch 
aotion  and  guarantee  our  oustomers  against  any  expense,  loss  or  damages 
in  the  matter.  The  litigation  referred  tp  in  the  circular  of  the 
so-oalled  "Edison  Phonograph  Company",  is  a  suit  brought  by  us  against 
Mr.  Andem  to  collect  an  outstanding  bill  of  considerable  size  for  phono¬ 
graphs  and  supplies  purchased  by  him  from  us,  and  not  paid  for.  He  is 
attempting  to  delay  the  collection  of -the  olaim  by  setting  up  ficti¬ 
tious  damages  whioh  he  olaims  under  oertain  alleged  oontraots.  The 
matter  will  sopn  be  determined,  and  oan  have  but  one  result,  viz:  That 
Mr.  Andem' s  olaim  is  baseless. 


November  6,  1899. 


Yours  very  truly, 

NATIONAL  PHONC 


Vfr a.  H.  H.  Lane ,  Esq. , 

C/o  W.  H.  H.  Lane  a  Co., 

Sydney,  K.  s.  W. ,  Australia. 

Bear  Sir: 

Under  date  of  June  21st  you  wrote  me  a  very  interesting  and 
gratifying'  letter,  as  to  the  condition  of  the  phonograph  and  graphophone 
business  in  Sydney.  The  letter  was  received  here  during  July,  but  in 
some  way  it  became  mislaid;  it  was  subsequently  found  and  the  entire 
matter  was  turned  over  to  my  attorneys  so  that  they  could  look  into  it, 
and  my  people  have  been  looking  into  the  matter  from  a  legal  standpoint 
ever  since,  but  as  yet  have  not  secured  an  opinion  that  is  entirely 
satisfactory  to  me.  Howevr,  at  this  late  day  I  desire  to  thank  you 
very  much  for  the  trouble  that  you  have  taken  and  for  the  information 
you  hnv"  given  me.  I  have  placed  the  matters  you  refer  to  before  the 
Companies  who  are  interested  in  the  manufacture  and  sale  of  phonographs 
and  supplies  in  Australia,  but  as  yet  have  not  heard  fully  from  them. 

In  the  meantime,  I  would  deem  it  a  further  favor  if  you  would  give  me 
some  additional  information  as  to  the  doings  of  the  Columbia  Phonograph 
Co. ,  of  which  you  speak.  Could  you  obtain  and  send  me  one  of  the  let¬ 
ters  which  you  state  the  Columbia  Co.  give  to  dealers,  stating  that  they 
are  at  liberty  to  sell  their  apparatus  in  Hew  South  Wales  without  patent 
litigation.  I  would  also  consider  it  an  expeclal  favor  if  you  could  at 
the  same  time  let  me  know  the  names  and  addresses  of  the  different  firms 
who  advertise  that  those  who  purchase  Columbia  graphophones  will  thereby 


Too.  H.H.L.  (2)  11/13/99. 


avoid  avoid  patent  litigation.  In  fact,  any  further  information  that 
you  can  give  me  on  this  general  subject  will  be  very  much  appreciated, 
and  I  only  h  >pe  that  at  some  future  time  I  shall  have  the  pleasure  of 
reciprocating  the  favor. 

Again  thanking  you  for  the  interest  you  have  token  in  this  matter, 

believe  me, 

Yours  very  truly, 


[ENCLOSURE] 


[ENCLOSURE] 


/7  : 

£?£ ZZC^/^C Zy  ^0^*7%***^ 

.  •  ^  /%Z 

££%&&'  ~  7fC  7  O^7 <&*&?  /TcZ  (^ZiZ<lZ 

^,j?/'£&?/it~&i*'*~  Z&7ZZ*Z<^&  ^ZZ~Z^y^>^-yy^/Lf 

/Z-^ZiTtZ^^Zz^Z  /Z^ZZZZ^  /te*zU^cr 

CZZZ&1>^  t&pZ <#t-2>i^fc-  uZ*£^-ZL-*S(~£<izc--* 'j7/cJ  &&*■  77 

&£<£'&£■  iPy  -o— ^->-— -r^  f  y  *£*2^^*- 

/fasu*t~  zz  tz^!'*z£  ~~z/zz 


- 


^5 

Zp7  Z  /jZZ  z^zZi /ZZs  ,/2^&£  \ 
■~Z’  7Z>£f  /%P-£*<J 

/7i£i£^ 

6^»’-  Z~ ^Z0Zt, 

7Z/Zu  /&7Zfa>-&Z.  /£~  7&ZZ  ^^7' 

ZZ</z-£z£  <4^  Z*7 


S^faT^Z'  /Z*>Z  < 

Cm2*  ^ 


^5^ 

S'/ *7*7*1 

77^/^^^faZ  *Z^Z'fa£&*Z  /ZZ 

<7?V*-r  Jfa#  ^Z&zZ^  ZzZC  /ds^ccs  ZZJLL, 

aZ/C  /Tt^Z^zZ.  TtfivtZZ  %£*.  /ZZ;  /%£^s 

**%  /Z  t  cZ&^<z 

ZTpZZZ-^  ~*f—  -'- 


[ENCLOSURE] 


[ENCLOSURE] 


/ srr  /y  _  ^ 

7^~  >#**- “yf^  ■  J$£cj 

*2^  ^>,  ! 
/^~C7>~Pt^C^<P^9-.  ^sA2*^l-!r  /?£*+*. 

#44'76  /%***?  7*-&^  y^cJ&^  rr  Cl^ £cJ$C  ,&*>**, 

^  ^  /&£c~  ^*^^4ZZC<  ^  | 

^*7^6  't?^<^'  /fLy?'  £*2^-^*^'*^*'  <%?&&*££' 

/fc?py£^  /$&  ^tZ'S^C'  S&  S0^  /7&/ZZ&><C 

|  '£^/frz€  \ 

!  £%^x7  7S±  ■  ‘ 

•^-0*70  /&<?  ^  •K3^yz£t~&  />y^ *77  e*-**^-  ^zz^a 

Tsis  /%+&£'  ££*&&£'  /£“  £^6 

yte’-Z? 

fiU44*j)  /%7sm£  /?  &77>-*+*  /£r  s&zZer&r**  j 

;  ^tyg^y^ j 

j  ^^5^^  //£&*&  iS /&<*>*'£  <&?£ 

j  <j$£2y0by**  *“  C3^67^c, 

I  "  ^>S 5^u  *i*t£p£  i^a^>  :4&*£etp''£&r 

qfccst&uC  ‘y£v>~i>ts  z&yu^yzc^--^ 


<8* 


- ilov. 


Edlson-Boll  Consolidated  Phonograph  no..  Ltd., 

39  Chorine  Cross  Rood, 

London,  o.,  England. 


Dear  Sirs: 


We  are  reliably  informed  that  throughout  Cape  Colony, 
Australia  and  ??ew  Zealand  the  Columbia  Phonograph  Co.  of  the  United 
States,  the  selling  agents  of  the  American  Craphophone  Co. ,  are  openly 
selling  graphophones,  supplies  and  records,  and  that  their  representa¬ 
tives  advertise  that  purchasers  and  users  of  such  goods  will  not  be 
subject  to  patent  litigation.  As  you  know,  wo  are  equally  interested 
with  you  in  this  field,  having  the  exclusive  right  to  manufacture  both 
phonographs  and  graphophones  for  use  there.  This  unrestricted  sale, 
therefore,  of  graphophones  and  supplies  in  violation  of  the  patents 
controlled  by  you  is  a  direct  injury  to  us.  We  therefore  request  you 
to  at  once  notify  all  such  violators  to  stop  and,  on  their  failure  to 
do  so,  to  begin  appropriate  legal  proceedings  against  them.  On  your 
failure  to  do  so,  we  shall  hold  you  liable  for  all  damages  and  will  fool 
at  liberty  to  institute  such  legal  proce  ’dings  on  our  behalf  in  your 
namo. 


Yours  very  truly. 


WEG/lWW 


General  Manager. 


HAYES  &  LAMBERT, 


PjLcrK 


NEWARK,  N.  J.  Nov. 20th.  ,  1899. 

National  Phonograph  Company,  •>  (  . '• 

Orange,  N.  J.  j  p,,.  ,j|^  j 

Dear  Sir:-  ....  . 

In  reply  to  your  favor  of  the  17th.inst.in  regard  to  the  com¬ 
pany  about  to  be  started  in  Paris  by  Bettini,  I  would  say  that  I  do  not 
see  how  at  present  Mr. Edison  can  object  to  Bettini  advertising  that  he 
will  sell  Edison  apparatus.  He  of  course,  would  be  able  to  purchase 
the  genuine  Edison  apparatus  either  in  this  country  or  in  England  and 
sell  them  in  Paris,  and  theoretically  we  have  no  grounds  for  saying  that 
he  does  not  intend  to  do  so.  If,  however,  after  he  has  started  his 
business,  he  advertises  that  he  sells  Edison  apparatus  when  he  does  not, 
Mr. Edison  could  at  once  prevent  the  use  of  his  name.  If  it  would  help 
Goold,  there  would  be  no  objection  to  your  cabling  to  one  of  the  French 
papers  in  Mr. Edison's  name,  that  he  has  heard  that  Bettini  connects  his 
(Edison's)  name  with  the  Company  he  proposes  to  organize,  and  that  Mr. 
Edison  has  not  authorized  him  to  do  so  ijj  any  way,  and  has  no  connection 
with  the  concern. 

I  return  the  enclosures. 

Yours  truly, 

ENCLOSURE*/’ 


[ATTACHMENT! 


COIIPAGNII  »ES  IIICRO-PMOGIUPUES  BETTINI 

SOCIETE  ANONYME  EN  VOIE  DE  FORMATION 


Sf^-GE  f>f(OYJS-Oiff£ :  27,  Avenue  de  l’Opera 


Appareils  Bettini  &  Edison 


PLAN  FINANCIER 

Capital,  divisc  cn  12.000  actions  dc  100  francs  chncunc . 

II  cst,  cn  outre,  crce  1 .500  parts  bcncliciaircs. 

Emi'i.oi  du  Capital  :  Dcvis  pour  installations,  stock  dc  machines,  fonds  di 

dc  constitution,  etc.  (dont  detail  ci-nprAs) . 

Apporls.  brevets,  etudes . 


Lcs  apporls  sc  diviscnl  commc  suit : 

250.000  francs  en  cspAccs,  ct  150.000  francs  cn  actions. 
Lc  capital  A  souscrirc  sera  done  dc . 


REPARTITION  DES  BENEFICES 

—  5  A  la  reserve  liignlc. 

—  Somme  suftlsantc  pour  servir  mix  actions  un  intcret  cumulatif  dc  0  «/,,  l'an. 

Sur  le  surplus  : 

—  Fonds  de  reserve  ou  d'nmorlisscmcnt  pouvnnt  montcr  jusqu'A  10  <*/„. 

—  15%,  au  Conscil  d’ Administration,  nvee  droit,  pour  cc  dernier,  d’en  nppliquer 5 «/„,•,  in  direction. 
Sur  le  surplus : 

U  nux  actions,  ct  -10  %,  mix  parts  benellcimrcs. 


EIV1PLOI  DU  CAPITAL 


,  <&/o* 


Installation  : 

doubler  ct  leur  installation 

Electric  machines  M . 

'Machines  A  raboicr,  installation  complete,  a' 

S"."7K.  20  Machines  triple  spring  motor.  . 

DilTcrentes  machines  niodelc  pour  in _ L. 

21  Machines  dinphrngme  Bellini  .  ^.“Y 

'*  Machines  typewriting  .... 


*  -  Inst 

20  Machine 
I  1  f  12  Ed.  Elc 


c  turbines,  inotcurs  elec- 


7.000  ^  /'U-o-o 

3.000 


Installation  clectrlquc,  batteries. 

I  Pour  stock  dc  ditferentes  machine _ _ 

«  '  A^VCncbcts  porn- artistes:  .  ..*..... 

Publicitd,  mnintici  des  brevets? fails  dc  cons 
““*7  bonds  de  roulcnicnt  pour  machines  Bettini 


ilcnux  vierges  ct  rouleaux  enregistrAs 


150.000  do.c-r-o  .. 

so.ooo  inr0 

150.000^  Fr.  150.000 
300.000 


Lc  ohllire  des  bAnAilces  nets  realises  sur  lcs 
21  Juillct  ct  22  Septembre  dc  cette  amice,  se  monte,  pour  lcs  diapbragmes  Bettini  scuts  cl  lcs  rouleaux 
enregistrAs,  A  60.000  Irancs  environ. 

II  y  a  done  lieu  d’njoutcr  A  ce  cliilTrc,  pour  sc  rendre  comptc  des  affaires  qui  pourront  ctre  rcnlisAcs 
par  la  future  Societc,  lcs  deux  nouvcllcs  machines  spccialcs  Bettini  qui  scront  fabriquecs  par  cite. 

En  dehors  de  coin,  il  nc  Taut  pns  pcnlre  de  vuc  que  lcs  ventes  ntlcindronl  ccrtaincmcnt  un  ciiilfrc 
scnsiblcment  plus  tSlcvd  dans  le  cournnt  de  l'nnncc  dc  l'Exposition  dc  1900,  ou  M.  Bettini  exposern  nux 
sections  Amiricnine  ct  llalicnnc. 

Ln  future  Societc  s’est  assure  lc  concours  de  M.  Bettini,  qui  a  accepts  lcs  Tonctions  d’Adminis- 
trntcur-Directeur. 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CQ.,  . 

Edison  laboratory, 

ORANGE,  N.  J, 

ORANGE  Hov.  23,  1099. 

A.  Allen  Sankey,  Ksq.,  - , - 

c/o  Biclow  A  Main  co. , 

136  Fifth  Ave . ,  Mew  York. 

My  dear  Mr.  Sankey: 

Referring  to  ray  letter  of  even  date,  quo tine  you  a 
not  price  of  twenty  cents  (20 <0  each  on  Sankey  records  the  seune  as 
those  heretofore  furnished,  I  desire  to  confirm  the  further  understand¬ 
ing  that  in  the  event  of  your  orders  reaching  a  total  of  ten  thousand 
(10,000)  prior  to,  say  May  1st,  1900,  we  will  make  you  a  further  rebate 
of  two  cents  (2<0  each  on  all  of  these  special  records  heretofore  or 
hereafter  to  be  furnished. 

Trusting  that  this  is  exactly  in  accordance  with  your  understanding, 
and  that  tin  lower  price  will  enable  you  to  secure  a  very  much  larger 
volume  of  business,  bolieve  me, 

Yours  very  truly. 


YffiO/lW 


President. 


Westee:' 

Note  the  special  rebate  I  have  quoted  Mr.  I.  Allen  Sankey 
of  the  Biglow  &  Main  Co.  when  they  will  have  taken  10,000  of  their 
particular  type  of  records.  This  should  be  kept  confidential  and  should 
go  no,  further,  as  if  this  rebate  is  rendered  it  will  have  to  be  figured 
specially. 

11/22/99.  W.  E.  5. 

Enc- 


[ATTACHMENT] 


H  ‘FANCY  GOODS  DEPOT.  ’5 


i  WALTER  DAVIES,  | 

Jf  •  BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER,  41 

1}  NEWS  VENDOR  &  ADVERTISING  AGENT,  jK 
© _ Xlm»»f  street.  WiiiTinimlMiol.^T^.a' 


<^4  “ARGUS  ”  AGENCY.  c£? 


take  an  early  opportunity  to  make  your  acquaintance. 

Meantime  he  will  be  pleased  to  reply  to  enquiries,  or  attend  to  any  business  of  the  Company  which 
arise,  or  dealers  can  communicate  direct  to  our  head  office  in  London. 

The  Edison  Bell  Consolidated  Phonograph  Coy.,  Ltd., 

39  CHARINd  CROSS  ROAD,  LONDON; 


Dear  Sir, 

Your  favors  of  Novr.  1  i. _  ... _ _ _ _ 

what  you  say  about  the  Edison  Bell  Company  not  having "any'legal 
right  to  prevent  the  use  of  machines  sold  by  you,  but  meanwhile 
they  are  demanding  and  receiving  a  Royalty  up  to  15  per  ceht 
on  the  selling  price  of  all  Phonograph  and  Graphophone  goods 
and  apparently  their  claim  here  is  a  good -one  as  -the  Patents* 
were  duly  registered  years  ago  and  have  recently  been  legally 
assigned  to  Trustees  representing  the  Edison  Bell  Company, 

You  can  auite  understand  that  that  we  are  slow  to  commence  the 
defence  of  our  position  in  the  Court  as  the  costs  would  probably 
very  soon  run  up  to  £500  or  £600,  and  in  the  event  of  ourwlnning' 
we  would  only  have  been  fighting  for  a  number  of  Jews  and  out¬ 
side  sharks  who  ar.e  selling  goods  at  any  price  they  can  get  and 
completely  demoralising  the  trade.  Some  of  the' dealers  here 
will  not  .combine,  and  if  they  did  would  only  be  held  so  dong  as 
it  suited  them.  Ur  Willoughby  and  ourselves  have  always  worked 
very  amicably  hut  all  the  others  in  this  city  who  have  gone  into 
the  talking  machine  business  at  all,  have  adopted  tactics  totally 
unworthy  of  decent  men.  The  Edison  feell  Co  has  adopted  the  pe-  ' 
^ tarv?lan  of  only  worrying  the  larger  firms,  with  the  result 
tnat  wiule  4  or  5  of  U3  are  being  compelled  to  pay  royalty 

°iT ^ftee?  outsiders  are  smuggling  in  goods  ahd  selling  them 
liuietly  at  ridiculously  low  prices  to  our  customers.  The  whole 
position  is  exasperating  to  such  a  degree  that  we  have  almost 
UP  retire  -from  the  business  in  any  lines  over 

which  this  English  Co  has  any  claims,  rather,  than  be  subjected 
to  continual  harras3ing.  We  do  not  know  whether  Mr  Willoughby 

Som™ Vi”  M°£PWhe  pr90ious  ’’Agreement"  put  forth  by  the 
Company  and  which  all  dealers,  are  supposed  to  sign,  but  it  con,, 
tdips  a  number  of  clauses  of. ,a  most  irritating  nature  -  for 
instance  in  the  first  place  we  have  to  submit  a  list  of  our 
stocks  and  sales  with  fun  particulars  ana  substantiate  this 
aSw^h  ?  a  atftutory  declaration,  and  in  addition  have- to 
aiioj  the  Company's  agent  to  overhaul  our  books  and  examine 
all  documnts.  .Meanwhile  we  have  rio  guarantee  thS  the 


information  tha  obtained  will  not  be  used  to  our  detri¬ 
ment.  Then  the  Co's  representative  a  Mr  Chamberlain  • 
prints  and  publishes  a  circular  quoting  the  prices  of 
machines  etc.  and  stating  that  the  maximum  discount  to  tte 
trade  on  orders  of  not  less  than  12  machines  is  10  per  cent,  so 
that  any  person  can. buy  one  machine  within  10  per  cent  of  the 
price  of  which  large  dealers  like  ourselves  oan  purchase  a  line 
thus  leaving  a  margin  of  only  10  per  cent  which  will  not  pay  for 
advertising.  In  our  opinion  the  business  is  destroyed  save  for 
small  dealers  with  a  stock  of  2  machines -and  100  records  An 
English  barrister  naadd  s.  L.  l,atham.  ha&been  in  these  colonies 
for  over  6  month3  as  the  represent ative  of  the  Edison  Bell  Co. 
and  has  succeeded  in  our  opinion  In  utterly  ruining  the  trade* 
both  for  dealers  here  and  for  his 'Company.  We  understand  he’ 
is  now  on  his  way  to  America  and  no  doubt  he  will  call  upon  you 
and  we  tru3t?you  will  give  him  a  reception  worthy  of  him. 

We  are  wri'ti^g  rather  fully  to  you  -  in  strict  confidence  _  and 
may  mention  that  so  far  we  have  managed  to  avoid  actually  payiig 
over  any  cash  but  it  is  quite  evident  that  we'  will  be  forced  to 
do  so  very  shortly  .  We  had  hoped  to  have  sent  you  some  very 
large  orders,  but  that  must  stand  over  for  the  present ,  man- 
while  we  have  not  ordered  one  cents  worth  from  the  English  Co 
nor  have  we  any  intention  of  so  doing,  as- they  We  ruined  our 
business  after  we  have  spent  years  of  hard  work  in  building 
it  up,  and  worse  than  all  by  their  methods  they  seem  determined 
to  hamper  the  large  importer  and  to  favor  the  smal  1  pettifoggijg 
dealer.  Will  be  glad  to  hear  from  you  fully  on  this  matter 
as  it  means  to  you  the  loss  of  the  whole  of  our  business  and 
also  that  of  others.  -  * 


Rogarding  the  Coin^Slot  Graphophon©  8  we  await  youx* 
advices  Gramophone  Order  sent  to  .you  last  mail,  we  trust  has 
been  shipped  as  we  require  the  stocks.  P.M. Prescott  has  written 
tp  parties'^  offering  gO  per  cent  discount  off  the  $25  Gramo 
?5  C0nta  each*  Is  hs  still  the  sole  Ex¬ 
port  Agent  for  the  national  Gramophone  Company? 

With  kind  regards. 

Yours  very  truly.  /' 


Dear  Mr.  Edison, - 

In  regard  to  your  suggestion  of  forming  a  small 
company  to  do  business  by  renting  phonographs  for  dictation  pur¬ 
poses,  I  find  on  enquiry  that  the  Graphophone  Company  has  a  very 
active  department  engaged  on  the  work  of  selling  graphophones  for 
dictation  purposes.  They  keep  one  or  more  men  subject  to  call 
to  adjust  and  repair  machines  in  the  offices;  so  far  they  have 
made  no  charge  for  this  service.  I  have  examined  the  outfit 
they  furnish  for  the  work.  The  machine  is  a  special  machine. 

Its  mandrel  is  inches  long,  and  the  blank  is  6  inches,  and 

somewhat  thicker  than  the  regular  blanks,  outside  diameter  about 
23/8  inches.  The  mandrel  is  thrown  in  and  out  by  a  clutch,  so 
that  in  stopping,  the  recorder  or  reproducer  is  not  lifted  off 
the  surface.  100  threads  to  the  inch.  Speed  from  80  to  100 
revolutions;  80  revolutions  seems  about  the  lowest  that  the  ma¬ 
chine  will  run  at  without  the  governor  stopping  the  motor.  My 
acquaintance  who  has  one  of  these . outfits  records  at  100  revolu¬ 
tions  and  reproduces  at  80  revolutions.  The  shaving  machine  is 
separate.  It  is  worked  by  a  treadle  like  a  sewing  machine,  and 
the  mandrel  runs  at  very  high  speed.  My  notion  is  that .there 
would  be  no  chance  to  compete  until  you  have  a  special  machine  as 
well  adapted  to  the  particular  use  as  is  the  special  graphophone. 

Of  course  if  you  built  such  a  machine  you  would  make  a  better  one. 

Yours/^ry  truly, 

Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq.,  /tc&jC 

Orange,  N.J.  “ 


important 


HERE'S  A  SCHEME  THAT  WILL  SAVE  TIME;  both  for  you 
and  for  us. 

We  enclose  a  set  of  four  Order  Blanks.  On  them  is  printed 
EVERY  NUMBER  of  every  record  we  have  in  our  No.  77  October 
record  list,  together  with  a  lot  of  numbers  from  7340,  up. 
(Hereafter  records  will  be  numbered  oonseoutively,  as  we  make 
them,  from  7340,  right  along.  Heretofore  we  have  kept  Band 
records  in  one  series  of  numbers.  Orchestra  records  in  another. 
Talking  records  in  another;  but  from  now  on,  ALL  reoords  will 
be  numbered  oonseoutively) . 

The  soheme  is  simple,  as  explained  on  bottom  of  each  blank, 
and  will  save  us  a  vast  amount  of  time  and  labor  in  our  Order 
Department,  besides  giving  you  a  reoord  of  what  you  have 
ordered,  and  an  itemized  reoord  of  our  shipments  to  you.  We 
have  p.  quantity  of  these  blanks,  padded  in  bunohes  of  85,  for 
distribution.  Ask  for  one  pad  eaoh,  #1,  #3,  #3  and  #4  the  next 
time  you  order  of  us . 

Be  sure  to  sign  your  name  on  eaoh  and  every  order  blank. 

Yours- truly, 

NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO. 

C.  H.  Wilson, 

Manager  of  Sales. 


1899.  Phonograph  -  Edison  United  Phonograph  Company  (D-99-19) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  relating  to  the  business  of  the 
Edison  United  Phonograph  Co.  and  its  subsidiaries.  Included  are  items 
concerning  the  company's  financial  problems,  wrangling  among  its  board 
members,  and  relations  between  it,  the  subsidiary  Edison-Bell  Consolidated 
Phonograph  Co.,  Ltd.,  and  the  Edison  Phonograph  Works.  Many  of  the 
letters  are  by  George  N.  Morison,  secretary  of  the  company,  and  are 
addressed  to  Stephen  F.  Moriarty,  vice  president.  There  is  also 
correspondence  by  Moriarty  and  by  John  E.  Searles,  president  of  the  Edison 
United  Phonograph  Co.  At  the  end  of  the  folder  are  two  undated 
communications  by  Edison  to  Josiah  C.  Reiff  denouncing  Moriarty  as  "an 
extremely  dangerous  adventurer"  who  "has  been  living  on  the  Co  for  years." 

Approximately  80  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  Most 
of  the  unselected  items  are  letters  detailing  routine  daily  operations  of  the 
company  or  material  that  duplicates  information  in  selected  items. 


^ '  S.  4^/r/fiJ,  7/muAiif:  (§r/tA0/K  &  ZiTfltirtikHif  $ec/r.fa,r, 

®le/i./u?H/  d  //tona/rty,  ?,w  7%i»u&m6  j7<Uu>oty  &jrector.'  7/A,/u///k-  ,7r 


•2-7-W-IL-L-IA  M  -STR  EE-Tt- 


Measra  Cox,  Biddulph  *  Co:, 
Bankers, 

16  Charing  Cross, 


Edison  HouBe, 

Northumberland  Avenue.  LONDON. 
5t.h  January  .1899, 


Dear  Sira, 

In  reference  to  the  conversation  I  had  with  your  Mr 
Biddulph  this  morning,  I  beg  to  confirm  my  statements  made  to  him 
re  a  loan  of  £5,000  (Five  thousand  pounds  sterling),  which  X  wish 
to  obtain  for  a  period  of  60  days,  for  this  Company,  against  the 
securities  which  I  will  deposit  with  you,  0f  £7, 500,  „f  first 
Mortgage  Debenture  Bonds  of  the  Rdis on-Bell  Consolidated  Phono¬ 
graph  Co:  dJ?  . 


Thia  loan  ia  additionally  secured,  by  310  Multiplex 
Automatic  Phonographs,  which  have  been  delivered  to  the  Bdis on- 
Bell  Consolidated  Phonograph  Co:,  and  payment  for  them  at  the 
rat  e  of  £16  per  machine  is  now  due  by  them  to  us,  and  iranediatel 
upon  rsoeipt  of  this  money  from  the  Edlson-Bell  Consolidated  Co; 

it  will  be  paid  to  you  to  take  up  this  loan. 

Youna  faithfully. 


Vice  President, 


New  York,  January  6th,  1899. 


My  dear  Mr  Moriarty: -PERSONAL. 

Mr 8.  Moriarty  sailed  with  her  Mother,  Mrs.  Valentine, 
on  Wednesday,  January  4th,  per  Steamship  "Fuerst  Bismarck"  for 
Genoa. 

The  vessel  was  crowded, there  not  being  a  vacant  room, 
and  among  the  passengers  was  a  cousin  of  the  Czar,  Grand  Duke  Cyril 
Vladimiroviteh,  and  he'goes  to  attand  a  wedding  of  Princess  Helen 
of  Orleans. 

I  believe  that  we  will  see  more  of  Mr  Searles,  and  I 
would  not  be  surprised  if  he  made  his  office  in  our  building,  and 
he  will  undoubtedly  give  more  attention  to  the  Cotton  business. 

He  seems  to  have  regained  his  health,  and  looks  as 
vigorous  as  ever,  but  I  regret  that  he  does  not  push  our  business 
more,  for  if  a  good  alliance  could  be  made  with  Edison,  and  the 
business  here  for  Soith  America  taken  up  properly,  we  would  get. 
the  orders  instead  of  this  man  Prescott,  who  I  hear  has  twenty-one 
clerks  now,  and  has  a  big  store-room  on  Broad  Streetm  next  to  Hint 
Eddy  &  Company,  but  Mr  Searles  is  afraid  of  losing  his  money,  and 
directly  it  will  be  too  late  for  us. 

I  obtained  from  Mr  Searles  this  week,  a  Check  for  Taxes 
for  the  I. year  18977,  amounting  with  costs  to  |l,197.78,  but  as  the 
days  and  weeks  go  bye  and  no  more  money  comes  from  abroad,  he  is 
more  and  more  disinclined  to  advance  any  money. 

This  week  I  am  in  receipt  of  a  letter  from  the  Multiplex- 


Phonograph  Company.’,  copy  of  which  I  enclose,  demanding  payment  for 
the  remainder  of  the  machines,  which  are  stored  in  Brooklyn,  X  do 
not  know  what  will  be  the  outcome  of  this. 

The  Graphophone  Company,  you  remember'  have  some  extensive 
executive  offices  in  the  Bowling  Green  Building,  but  I  hear  they 
intend  to  give  them  up,  and  move  to  Bridgeport?. 

X  enllose  you  clipping  from  the  New  York  Herald  of 
January  5th,  and  my  object  is  not  particularly  to  call  your  atten¬ 
tion  to  the  fraud,  but  to  the  fact  that  people  seem  So  ready  to 
put  their  money  in  the  Phonograph,  without  even  satisfying  them¬ 
selves  of  the  character  or  standing  of  the  man  who  attempted  to 


[ENCLOSURE] 


* 

MULTIPLEX  PHONOGRAPH  COMPANY 
1358  Broadway,  &  619  Sixth  Avo . 

New  York,  N.Y,  Jany  4,  1899. 

Edison  United  Phonograph  Co., 

27  William  St., 

City. 

Gentlemen: - 


We  again  beg  to  call  your  attention  to  the  fact  that  ther 
is  an  unpaid  balance  due  us  of  over  $3,000.00  on  account  of  the 
maohlnes  in  Brooklyn  Storage.  Your  order  with  us  specifically 
states  that  you  are  to  receive  and  pay  for  machines  as  fast  as 
completed,  and  we  have  bills  outstanding,  against  these  machines 
dated  last  August  and  creditors  as  you  muBt  realize  are  becoming 
very  insistent. 

This  continued  delay  has  injured  our  credit  to  a  very 
large  extent  and  we  insist  that  you  make  us  full  payment  immediate¬ 
ly  so  thatvwe  may  pay  our  creditors,  whether  or  not  you  make  early 
shipment  of  the  machines.  Please  give  us  an  early  answer  stating 
what  you  will  do. 

Yours  very  truly, 

multiplex  PHONOGRAPH  CO., 

M.  V.  Gress, 

Vice-Prest. 


'  V 


New  York,  January  11th,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr  Mori arty: -PERSONAL. 

I  am  sending  you  tn-day  copies  of  some  letters  from 
the  Phonograph  Works,  which  will  show  you  that  they  are  becoming 
restless  under  the  delay  of  ordering  the  stock  of  goods  forward 
which  were  ordered  by  the  Edison-Bell. 

Mr  Gress  is  also  impatient  at  the  delay  in  not  getting 
his  money,  and  while  he  is  not  so  much  "interested  in  the  fact  of 
whether  his  goods  go  forward  or  not,  he  does  want  his  money,  in 
addition  to  which  we  have  some  bill&  for  cablesand  other  things 
here  which  have  not  been  paid. 

We  owe  Bettini  now  some  $1,200.  and  we  will  soon  owe 
the  Cabinet  people  for  the  36  Cabinets  ordered,  which  will  have 
to  be  paid,  and  Mr  Searles  is  now  becoming  very  impatient  at  the 
delay  in  the  Edison-pell  not  making  us  a  remittance. 

In  consequence  of  all  these  demands  for  money,  he  directed 
me  yesterday  to  send  you  the  cablq.I which  I  forwarded  to  you  yester 
day. 

He  said  to  me  that  not  having  been  able  to  see  Edison 
duecta  the  delay  in  consumating  matters  abroad,  he  felt  mortified 

whenever  the  name  of  Edison  was  mentioned  to  him. 

& 

I  took  him  over  Prescott’s  office  yesterday  to  show 
him  the  Big  Graphophone,  but  he  was  in  such  a  frame  of  mind  over 
the  business,  that  he  did  not  enthuse  much  over  it,  although  it  is 


superior  machine. 


Prescott  has  not  submitted  any  proposition  yet,  and  it  is 
not  at  all  certain  that  Mr  Searles  will  do  anything  with  him,  and 
I  pointed  out  to  him  that  we  needed  Mr  Edison  more  than  anyone  else 
and  that  we  might  not  be  able  to  rely  upon  Prescott  carrying  out 
the  terms  of  any  arrangement  made  with  him,  this  latter  was  due  to 
the  fact  that  Mr  Searles  asked  me  if  I  thought  we  could  trust  him 
but  I  said  that  he  was  an  interloper  v/ith  no  rights  whatever,  al¬ 
though  undoubtedly  a  bright  man  with  no  end  of  energy,  still  I  am 
sure  he  will  not  be  used  unless  it  is  clear  that  he  can  be  a  decided 
advantage  to  the  Company. 

It  does  seem  really  disheartening  when  you  realize  that 
when  Mr  Searles  sailed'  fir  London,  everything  here  was  in  just 
such  a  position  that  good  results  could  have  been  obtained,  and 
Edison  was  in  a  frame  of  mind  to  meet  almost  any  proposition  from 
Mr  Searles,  but  this  longucontinued  delay,  and  the  failure  to  take 
the  machines,  has  caused  him  to  lose  confidence  in  our  Company 
again. 

This  letter  is  not  cheerful,  and  really  I  hesitate  mailing 
it,  because  you  have  so  much  worry,  and  I  am  sure  you  must  be  doirj 
your  best  ,  but  it  may  enable  you  to  feel  the  pulse  of  the  situation/ 


here. 


Copy. 


BDTSON-BEMi  CONSOLIDAT ED  PHONORRAPH  CO: 
39  Charing  Cross  Road.  W.C. 

12t,h  .Tanuary,  1899. 


The  Edison  United  Phonograph  Co: 

Edi  son  House, 

Northumberland  Avenue.  W.C. 


Dear  Sirs, 

Referring  t  o  the  cheque  for  £950.  handed  Mr  Moriarty 
yesterday,  we  shall  be  glad  if  you  will  instruct  your  Head  Office 
to  ship  immediately  the  475  Type  2  Machines  in  respect  of  which 
this  cheque  was  paid.  Kindly  communicate  by  cable. 

Yours  faith  fill  ly, 

(Signed)  A.  Simpson  Slater. 

Secret  ary, 


J'rJiw  S.  &&<>/*„/< 

<$fc/f-/wts  3  hr*'  /shiuf/fi/itt 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 
Orange,  N.  J. 
DearxSir:- 


Pleas'e  excuse  delay  in  replying  to  your  letter  of  Deer. 
14th,  enclosing  remittance  of  Two  thousand  Dollars  ($2,000.)  for 
which  we  beg  to  hand  you  our  receipt,  dated  December  14th,  1898. 

In  accordance  with  the  terms  of  Article  II  of  the  Agree¬ 
ment  dated  April  7th,  1898,  the  above  sum  was  payable  to  the  Edison 
United  Phonograph  Company,  therefore  it  is  not  Required  that  the 
International  Graphophone  Company  also  affix  their  signature  to 
the  receipt. 


Yours,  very  truly, 

Vs?? 


Secretary. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Received  of  Thomas  A.  Edison,  the  sum  of  Two  thousand 
Dollars  (§2,000.)  pursuant  to  agreement  dated  April  7th,  1898 
between  the  Edison  United  Phonograph  Company. international 
Graphophone  Co.,  Edison  Phonograph  Works  and  Thomas  A.  Edison,  and 
in  accordance  with  Paragraph  II  of  said  Agreement. 


New  York, Deer'.  14th,  1898. 


New  York,  January  17th,  1899. 


My  dear  Mr  Moriarty: -PERSONAL. 

I  am  duly  in  receipt  of  your  letter  of  January  6th, 
and  than*  you  for  your  kind  inquiries  in  regard  to  my  health. 

1  am  glad  to  say  that  I  have  entirely  recovered,  and  feel 
as  well  as  ever. 

I  realize  fully  that  no  aid  is  given  you  on  this  side 
looking!, *0  the  stopping  of  shipments  of  illegal  machines,  but  as  I 
Have  written  you  before,  Mr.  Searles  will  not  see  Edison  or  endeavor' 
to  make  any  agreement  with  him  until  we  have  orderds  to  ship  the 
goods  we  have  already  ordered  from  the  Phonograph  Worljs. 

The  delay  on  the  part  of  the  Edison-Bell  Company  to  make 
payment  for  their  goods  has  made  Mr  Searles  afraid  to  assume  any 
responsibilities  involving  money  . 

I  regret  this  state  of  affairs  and  wish  I  could  do  some¬ 
thing  to  benefit  the  situation. 

I  feel  sure  however  that  Mr  SearleB  will  take  hold  as 
soon  as  he  can  say  to  Edison  that  he  can  ship  the  goods. 

Your  letter  reads  as  if  you  were  confident  of  success, 
and  I  admire?  youfccourage  in  the  faoe  of  such  extraordinary 
difficulties. 

I  note  what  you  say  in  regard  to  our  Patents  in  Europe, 
and  particularly  in  England,  but  it  wiia  not  be  long- before  onepof 
ourr-’fatentm  expires,  and  it  is  a  most  important  one  too. 


-2- 


I  do  not  want  you  to  feel  that  GresB  is  carried  away  with 
any  idea  in  regard  to  what  he  can  do  with  his  Patents  in  Europe. 

They  do  not  assume  any  arrogance,  nor  have  they  been 
PEeSiimtioue  in  regard  to  their  dealings  with  us,  but  they  have  in¬ 
sisted  upon  the  payment  of  their  account,  and  the  carrying  out  of 
the  terms  of  the  contract,  and  if  you  will  look  at  the  length  of 
time  after  maturity  before  we  paid  the  Royalty  under  the  contract 
and  to  the  fact  that  we  have  not  yet  paid  them  for  all  the  machines 
ordered,  I  do  not  think  we  can  really  censure  them. 

The  weak  point  in  regard  to  the  contract  with  Gress,  is 
in  the  payment  of  a  Royalty  for  soitor-many  years,  and  if  you  will 
remember  this  contract  was  made  after  several  months  of  endeavor 
to  secure  these  Patents,  and  after  you  had  included  them  in  your 
contract  with  the  English  Company,  but  Mr  Searles  agreed  to  this 

because  it  was  the  best  we  could  do,  at  that  t ime .  *///# 

Juv/r-  A  M  jWA  Afcw  u-  AttCr;  s* 

Notwithstanding  the  Patents  that  we  own,  I  think  that 

these  Multiplex  Patents  will  be  of  service. 

I  do  not  think  it  would  be  wise-  at  this  time  to  have  any 

straight  out  business  talk  with  Mr  Gress,  because  we  have  applied 

jf&K  a.  number  of  Patents,  and  I  have  the  receipts  for  the  appliea- 

tibnrvof  a  number  of  them  in  my  possession,  but  we  want  all  of  these 

Patents  in  our  possession,  and  we  also  want  a  proper  assignment  to 

A 

us,  which  cannot  be  done  until  the  Patents  come  from  Europe,  but 
I  am  watching  them  closely,  and  as  soon  as  we  get  them  all,  and  tte 


assigments  for  them  then  will  be  the  time  for  us  to  see  what  we 
can  do. 

In  regard  to  Bettini,  we  have  as  ydu  say  a  contract  with 
him  for  Great  Britain  and  Colonies;  and  we  are  endeavoring  at  this 
moment  to  obtain  possession  of  the  Duplicator  Patent,  and  I  suspect 
that  it  isnnow  in  the  possession  of  Mr  Dickinson,  but  we  have  not 
yet  been  able  to  obtain  it. 

We  owe  Bettini  about  $1,300.  and  I  have  been  delaying 
the  payment  of  this  money  until  we  could  get  hold  of  the  Duplicator 
Patent. 

DeCastro  has  attempted  a  ruse  or  two  to  obtain  payment 
of  his  bills,  but  I  was  not  caught,  and  I  do  not  intend  to  be  , 
yesterday  however  I  was  obliged  to  practically  inform  them  that  we 
were  delaying  payment  on  account  of  not  having  received  the  Patent, 
but  I  did  not  say  so  in  so  many  words. 

I  will  let  you  know  just  as  soon  as  we  get  this  Patent. 

We  do  not  contemplate  making  any  contracts  with  Bettini 

I  note  what  you  say  in  regard  to  Hough,  Kelly  and 
Hunting,  and  I  think  it  was  a  mistake  in  the  Edison-Bell  employing 
him  at  all,  or  in  having  Hough  associated  with  them  for  it  would 
not  surprise  me  at  all  if  they  were  simply  using  all  the  information 
they  can  get  hold  of  against  the  Edison-Bell  Company. 

You  know  that  Hunting  had  a  place  here  on  Broadway 
about  22nd  Street,  and  made  hksxooraxRe cords,  but  Ituftder stand  that 
he  warn  an  Agent  of  the  Qolumbia  -Phonograph  Company,  or  in  other 


-4- 

word8  the  Graphophone  people,  and  was  paid  a  good  salary  by  them, 
for  selling  machines  abroad,  but  I  do  not  vouch  for  any  of  these 
statements,  however  you  know  that  he  was  arrested  at  one  time  for 
making  obscene  Records,  so  that  I  would  not  be  surprised  at  any¬ 
thing  these  people  might  do. 

Tours  very  truly, 


New  York,  January  19th,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriartyi- 

I  am  just  in  receipt  of  your  lomg  Personal  letter, 
dated  January  11th,  and  I  am  pleased  to  receive  it,  but  while  I 
wrote  you  in  a  Personal  sense,  December  30th,  yet  that  letter  wa3 
more  true  than  you  have  taken  it,  and  I  did  not  write  without  good 
reason,  but  if  any  trouble  had  arisen,  or  should  arise  in  the 
future,  I  should  cable  you  without  a  moment's  delay,  to  know  your 
views  under  the  circumstances,  therefore  you  can  always  make  your 
mind  quite  easy,  for  nothing  of  an  important  nature  would  progress 
very  far  wijyjput  your  knowing  it. 

I  am  glad  to  have  such  a  full  explanation  of  affairs,  but 
it  has  occurred  to  me  many  a  time  what  a  difficult  matter  it  is  to 
sell  our  Patents  wheiv  they  have  sncshort  a  time  to  run,  much  less5 
to  sell  Rights  in  Prance  where  act  Patents  are  worthless,  and  it 

seems  most  extraordinary  that  you  seem  able  to  sell  such  Rights 
aJ> 

we  possess  there,  for  anything  like  the  sum  you  mention. 

Of  course  it  is  premature  to  talk  abqut  the  style  of 
machines  which  may  be  ordered:  for  Prance,  but  do  you  not  think 
that  the  "Home"  machine  is  worthy  of  consideration,  for  it  sells 
largely  here,  and  it^so  much  better  than  the  eStandarcB. 

You  make  a  point  of  the  fact  that  it  was  thought  before 
you  left  America,  that  if  you  could  onlyplace  an  order  for  one 
or  two  thousand  machines  with  Bdison-,  we  could  gain  his  co-operatio*OV% 
In  reply  to  this,  I  want  simply  to  remind  you  that  since 


the  day  you  went  abroad,  the  business  at  the  Phonograph  Works  has 
been  increasing,  and  while  much  of  their  output  has  gone  to  our 
territory,  yet  the  fec£*remains  that  the  Works  got  orderdjno  matter 
from  what  source,  which  operated  against  us  in  making  them  more 
independent,  therefore  as  these  orders  have  increased  up  to  the 
present  time,  the  Works  have  not  since  looked  upon  our  orders  as 
big  as  we  are  inclined  to  look  upon  them  ourselves,  but  the  orders 
we  gave  the  Works  did  aid  us  to  theepoint  when  Mr  Edison  had  his 
interview  with  Mr  Searles,  and  when  he  left  for  Europe  there  was 
every  indication  of  a  most  satisfactory  result  of  the  interview 
at  that  time;  but  unfortunately  weeks  and  months  have  since  gone 
by,  and  not  only  have  we  delayed  the  shipment  of  machines  long 
since  ordered  or  past  due  as  per  agreement  with  Works,  but  we 
have  also  delayed  payments  to  the  Works  of  which  I  have  written 
so  many  ±*mes,  that  it  has  exhausted  the  patience  of  Edison,  and 
we  are  now  back  to  the  old  status,  and  they  are  shipping  machines 
as  recklessly  as  ever,  and  I  write  this  simply  to  show  that  we  had 
an  opportunity  of  rectifying  this  situation  but  failed  to  take 

advantage  of  it. 


It  certainly  has  been  great  good  work  on  your  part  to 
straighten  up  all  the  complications  of  the  Edison  Bell  Corporation 
but  we  have  learned  a  lesson  that  if  they  give  us  any  large  orders 
in  future;  ,h,y  ,honla  obliged  ^  ^  ^ 

for  them  within  a  given  time. 

iu.lt  upon  my 


mind  that  perhaps  Annan  or  Wyatt  or  may  be  someone  else  have 

been  instrumental  in  causing  the  delays  of  the  Attornies  in 
iirgpthe  contracts  for  the  purpose  of  gaining  time  . 

I  hope  you  will  be  successful  in  forcing  Stollwerck  to  a 
settlement. 

X  want  to  just  remark  that  if  anyone  should  take  such  an 
imjprtant  step  as  was  hinted  at  in  my  letter,  if  done  at  all,  would 
be  done  without  considering  all  the  important  points  or  results 
that  you  mention  V would  be  caused  by  a  dissatisfied  mind^  therefore 
more  or  less  reckless,  but  a  word  from  me  has  repeatedly  changed 
the  current, and  so  it  would  if  any  such  thing  as  this  was  on  the 
point  of  being  taken,  but  it  was  actually  suggested  and  X  forget 
now  what  my  reply  was.it  was  however  in  all  probability  cautionary 
*2/  this  in  a  strictly  personal  sens - 

Your  views  are  Undoubtedly  well  taken  in  not  wishing  to 
take  legal  action  against  the  Edison  Bell  when  there  is  any  pros¬ 
pect  at  all  in  securing  the  money,  and  I  have  no  doubt  that  Mr 
Searles  would  agree  with  you  thoroughly  on  this  point,  notwithstand 
ing  the  cable  that  was  sent  some  time  agOf  jfa+y 

I  note  what  you  say  in  regard  to  prices  on  future  orders 
and  I  shall  keep  this  before  me  and  remind  Mr  Searles  at  the  proper 
time . 

Yours  very  truly. 


New  York,  January  20th,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriarty,  Personal. 

I  am  calling  you-J attention  to  the  account  of  the  Edison 
Bell  in  a  separate  letter,  and  asking  you  to  try  to  send  us  a 
remittance  on' receipt  of  letter,  because  the  money  you  have  sent  on 
sayl.9 50 .  is  now  entirely  exhausted,  in  fact  we  have  paid  out  more 
than  was  received,  due  to  our  being  obliged  to  pay  Bettini's  account- 
to-day  which  amounted  to  §1,278.10-. 

I  had  to  talk  Mr  Searlos  into  paying  this  bill,  but  I  do 
not  think  that  he  will  pay  the  bill  for  Cabinets,  unless  we  receive 
some  more  money. 


I  do  not  want  to  tire  you  with  my' comments  on  the  situa¬ 
tion,  but  I  really  cannot  understand  why  the  Edi son-Bell  do  not 
put  vjk  in  some  of  the  large  Cities  that  they  control,  every  single 
Multiplex  that  they  have,  because  they  pay  here,  and  the  more  they 
put  out  the  more  money  they  get,  and  they  ought  to  send  us  another 
order  for  them. 

Another  thing  that  should  not  be  lost  sight  of  is  Edison'a 
small  Automatic  Slot  machine,  and  I  would  not  be  surprised  to  hear 
of  their  soon  being  shipped  over  to  Europe  by  Edison. 

At  present  Mr  Searles  has  his  office  next  to  us,  but 
he  is  going  down  on  the  13th  floor,  and  has  rented  two  offices 
there,  and  will  probably  move  in  in  the  course  of  a  week. 

He  seems  pretty  well,  and  is  attending  to  his  business  as 


l/e*y  , 


usual. 


(pearled,  ffmiWcud 

rfy,  JS»  7Hr*ift/sM& 


'dckm/(4mS^a 


(SeTuum:  &  7l;77foredoti/,  <7Ucrel<//ry. 


I  LLIAM  STREET, 


S.  P.  Moriarty,  Esq. , 
London,  England. 
Dear  Sir:- 


7L 


iany>— 24th,J.S9-9. 


-J8L- 


Mr  Searles  has  received  a  reply  from  Prescott  in  regard 
to  his  proposition  to  take  hold  of  the  business  here  and  secure 
orders,  but  I  have  not  yet  seen  it,  although  he  promised  to  let  me 
have  it. 


Morgan  Gress,  the  son,  has  just  gone  South  to  be  married, 
but  will  live  in  New  York,  and  he  will  undoubtedly  want  to  make 
more  money,  therefore,  do  not  be  surprised  if  they  kick  over  the 
traces,  and  sell  goods. 

Yours  very  truly. 


Secretary. 


(Bhisan  pjcnasfi  (18) 
■BoxtlwmbexlKrt'ir  %b&nne, 

Ex ixiisoxt, 

8K.& 

86th  January  1899. 


Bear  Mr  Moriarty, 

I  have  not  heard  from  you  te-dty  ,  and  do  not  know 
if  this  letter  will  reach  jc  u  or  not. 

There  is  nothin/?  important  to  write  about,  except  that  a  represer. 
-tative  of  Messrs  Cocks  Biddulph  &  Co:  coiled  to-dty  to  see  you.  He 
wants  your  signature  to  another  document.  He  said  he  will  call  again 
on  Friday  morniing  do  out  XI  o'clock  in  the  hope  of  catching  you  then, 
and  get  the  signature  to  the  tb  cfiiment. 

There  has  been  a  great  robbery  at  Parrs  Bank  in  the  City  the 
other  day,  when  over  £60,000  in  bank  notes  were  cleanly  taken  away. 

The  affair  is  wrapped  in  mystery,  ani  no-ane  seems  to  be  able  to  unrav 
tiio  mystery.  It  is  the  coolest  and  cleanest  robbery  of  modern  times. 

There  is  only  one  let  IB  r  in  for  you  to-duy  which  I  enclose. 

Yours  very  truly, 


14.  Austinfriars, 

2^7  4 , 


/^»  -^SC. 


'  —  ^7  oj^ 

tS^tzLcJy  ^>W  <i+L.a+&^~ 

£  /Z:  S& 

£~  JZrzh^s- 

Ml  ZcJzZj-  .  _ 

*<  <T  ^T  ~-^rr  7-  ^2.  ^  <  ^  ^ 

'^»*  /£L«^*»£^L 

*i£  <t2zZzz*x*  <&Z 


New  York,  February  10th,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr.  Moriarty:  -PT5RS0NAL. 

For  the  last  ten  days  or  so,  I  have  been  writing  and 
telegraphing  Mr  Searles  for  permission  to  ship  the  Records  and 
Cylinder®  ordered  by  you,  and  for  per  mission  to  pay  Gress,  but 
he  has  steadily  refused,  although  I  keep  at  it  every  time  I  write. 

This  morning  how  ever  I  am  rev/arded  with  a  telegram  from 
him  in  reply  to  my  telegram  of  yesterday,  which  reads  as  follows: - 
"YOU  MAY  SHIP  RECORDS  AND  CYLINDERS  AND  PAY  GRESS". 

When  your  cable  was  received  yesterday  morning,  I  made 
up  my  mind  to  go  out  and  see  the  people  in  Newark,  and  make  every 
effort  to  get  a  reduction  in  price  on  the  Holding's  Gilmore's  and 
Issler's  Bands. 

I  succeeded  in  getting  the  price  down  to  20  cents,  but  I  con¬ 
cluded  we  needed  something  a  lifttle  better  still,  to  pay  fbr  all 
the  cables  and  telegrams  recently,  so  in  the  course  of  a  half  an 
hour  or  so,  I  got  off  another  cent,  making  the  price  to  us  19  cents 
in  consideration  of  our  paying  the  bill  in  ten  days. 

I  promised  this,  but  I  am  afraid  I  will  have  a  fight  to  get 
yout 

the  money,  so  if  w»-  can  send  us  anything  on  receipt  of  this  letter 
it  will  be  thankfully  received. 

Notwithstanding  the  fact  that  you  tell  U3  to  draw  for  the 
full  amount  of  the  Records,  and  half  th&  amount  of  the  cylinders, 
you  must  realise  that  this  will  necessitate  Mr  Searles  paying  out 
more  than  we  receive,  because  we  will  be  oblied  to  pay  the  Works 

.-thS  °f  thSlr  billf  oasl:?'  a****  tl>e  remaining  fourth  in  30 


f>2- 

days. 

In  addition  we  are  paying  Gress  Si, 000. 

I  hope  you  have  not  failed  to  answer  my  letter  to  you  of 
January  21st,  because  they  are  anxiously  looking  for  some  word  from 
me,  which  will  reassure  them. 

Mr  Gress,  Senior  is  here  now,  and  when  they  wrote  the  letter 
to  us,  I  put  them  off  for  a  couple  of  weeks,  telling  them  that  I 
would  write  to  London,  and  that  I  would  probably  receive  a  reply 
which  would  be  satisfying  to  them,  therefore  I  must  say  something 
to  them,  very  soon,  in  fact  I  do  not  think  they  will  wait  until 
this  letter  gets  to  you,  and  I  am  anxious  to  get  all  the  patents 
we  have  asked  for,  indeed  I  can  get  almost  anything  I  ask  for, 
unless  they  get  the  idea  that  we  are  not  going  to  amount  to  any¬ 
thing-. 

These  are  really  the  only  Patents  that  we  have  in  Prance-. 

It  is  only  the  frindship  that  I  have  worked  up  with  this^peopie 
that  has  prevented  an  outbreak  before  now;  for  they  can  sell  their 
machines?,  and  they  would  certainly  go  abroad!,  and  cause  us  an 
additional  annoyance. 


Yours  very  truly. 


P.S.  We  hope  to  ship  the  Records  on  Wednesday,  February,  15th, 1899. 


72v)idt>u£  J 7%0)mUJ&  <§t£iiwi{  &  7&ffikritent  <§ecre&t/ry. 

®te/i/lf/fl/^7^^rwdyJJmMa^m6  J&vitory  SMrectcrrr  2//£nt/m>/v 7M^tU/ei  Jr,M 


■  Dear  Sir:- 

Referring  to  the  Agreement  you  have  just  sent  us  of 
the  Edison  Bell  Consolidated  Phonograph  Company,  Limited!,  and  the 
Edison  United  Phonograph  Company  and  Stephen  F.  Moriarty,  compro¬ 
mising  points  in  differnce,  we  desire  to  call  your  atttention  to  th 
the  fact  that  there  is  no  date’  updn  the  document,  and  would  thank 
you  to  kindly  give  us  the  exact  date,  so  that  we  can  have  it  for 
correct  reference*. 

Your  letter  to  Mr  Searles  states  that  you  are  sending  me 
the  completed  official  document,  but  neither  your  signature  or  that 
of  the  United  Company's  appears  on  it. 

“Ml!r  “«  «*»««/  ho.  it  ...  .ignoai 

and  much  oblige*. 

Yours  very  truly. 


Secretary. 


J/b/w$.$earleA  Matf/e/it  37u>/nMJ& fidtitons  &  %7/knAvn/,  Secretary. 

<$Xt/i./uyns  3  ~7?/ma<rty,  %a?  ZL>,c/t«/<  Mnuny  3Hnctotf  7/£»:d>v/iJ//tjati/<x  3?«, 


London,  England. 
Dear  Sir:- 


In  reply  to  your  cable  of  February  16th,  which  reads 
"ARRANGING  REORGANIZATION  GIVE  NO  INFORMATION  WHATEVER  TO  ANYONE 
ABOUT  NEW  MACHINES." 

We  do  not  quite  understand  why  you  should  cable  this,  because 
we  have  no  communication  with  the  Edison  Bell  '’ompany,  except  ifr 
regard  to  shipments  or  orders,  anyhting  else  would  go  through  you, 
or  anything  out  of  the  ordinary  would  excite  our  suspicion,  and  we 
i  would  first  communicate  with  you,  therefore  there  is  no  probability 
of  our  writing  them  anything  in  regard  to  Edison's  new  machines, 
if  that  is  what  you  refer  to,  as  wo  take  it  you  do. 

Yours  very  t  ruly, 


Secretary. 


S.  7.  Moriarty,  Esq., 
London,  England. 
Dear  Sir:- 


Referring  to  the  copy  of  Agreement  with  the  French  Company 
we  presume  you  have  thoroughly  noted  every  point,  which  we  are 
about  to  criticise,  at  the  same  time,  we  desire  to  call  your  atten¬ 
tion  to  several  clauses  in  your  Agreement. 

Clauses  1  and  2,  refer  to  Duplicating  Phonographic  Records-  for 
France-, 

In  reference  to  Duplicating  machines,  you  of  course  have 
remembered  that  we  do*  not  own  the  Patents  of  Bettini  for  his 
Duplicating  Machine  for  that  Country,  and  while  we  realise  thatnTie 
arfi  entitled  to  a  Duplicating  machine  under  our  Agreements  with 
Edison,  still  he  has  never  patented  such  a  machine  in  France-,  but 
BETTINI  HAS’,  THEREFORE  PLEASE  NOTE  THIS  FACT,  and  that  we  cannot 
use  Bettini' s  machine  in  France,  unless  we  pay  him  a  big  price  for 
them. 

Clauses  1  and  2,  give  the  French  Company  the  rightfc  to  the 
French  Patents,  which  we  have  obtained  from  G.  V.  Gress,  for  the 
Multiplex  Phonograph,  the  Return  Device,  and  his  slot  attachment, 


'  Sts/i/s/jv  7£7?t<rmi/rfy,  7mr  THau/mt 


{7.  7&77fa>'ii0ni  $eentcwu. 
WMWk&d.jz** 


and  as  these  Patents  have  been  acquired,  and  the  latter  two  applied 
for  previous  to  the  date  of  the  French  contract,  we  will  be  obliged 
to  deliver  them  notwithstanding  the  fqct  that  we  own  them  only 
conditionally,  subject  to  the  fulfillment  of  our  Agreement  with  Mr 
Grass. 

You  will  also  kindly  note  we  are  not  reimbursed  specifically 
for  the  cost  of  • -the  French  Multiplex  Patents,  about  $90.  and  $75. 
additional  for  the  Patent  on  the  return  Device  and  Slot  Attachment. 

Article  3  specifies  that  Schedule  3  of  the  Kdison-Bell  Contrai¬ 
ls  the  standard  for  prices  to  the  French  Company,  but  you  will 
remember  that  the  Edison-Bell  Supplementary  Contract  of  April  7th 
1898  changes  the  price  of  "HOME"  Phonographs,  and  modifies  the 
price  of  Type  No.  2J  also  Type  5,  has  been  billed  by  us  to  the 
Edison-Bell  in  1,000  lots  at  $80.  each,  thiB  is  the  Multiplex,  and 
should  be  made  clear  in  the  new  contract 

Type  No.  6,  was  also  changed  to  $70.  each,  although  we  had 
been  charging  $80.  previously',  but  the  Edison-Bell  contract  names 
$75.  as  the  price  for  Type  No.  6,  therefore  please  look  into  all 
of  these  prices,  and  see  that  the  correct  prices  of  all  types  of 
machines-  are  understood- 


\d/Jor/yMmled/< 


H  LLI  AM  STREET, 


We  do  not  make  much  on  Blanks,  but  I  hope  we  can  get  them 
cheaper. 

Please  bear  in  mind  that  we  have  never  shipped  you  any  "HOME" 
Phonographs,  and  consequently  have  not  bought  any  from  the  Works, 
therefore  \ve  do  not  know  what  we  will  be  obliged  to  pay  for  them 
should  we  place  an  order  in  the  future. 

I  am  told  that  the  Standard  Phonographs  are  not  inspected,  but 
that  the  "HOME"  Phonographs  are,  also  that  parties  that  have  pur¬ 
chased  the  Standard  Phonographs,  are  returning  them  and  paying 
Ten  Dollars  additional  for  a  "Home"  Phonograph  in  exchange. 

I  was  also  taid  to-day  that  orders  are  being  received  for 
Edison's  new  style  small  machine,  listed  at  $7.50,  but  neither  this 
ftia chine  nor  the  Large  Machine  Edison  is  now  making  have  yet  been 
sold,  but  from  another  source,  I  was  informed  that  a  certain  party 
had  bought  one  of  the  new  style  small  machines,  however  it  will  be 
but  a  short  time  before  they  are  on  the  market  in  quantities,  but 
as  Mr  Searles  has  not  yet  returned,  and  not  likely  to  before  the 
1st  of  March,  his  interview  with  Edison  will  be  delayed,  which  I 
regret  very  much,  neither  can  I  discuss  other  matters  which  are 


tfe/w $<$eatrt&),  7}a<'</mK  CTTtomMJl/t  S//td<?W  &  7l.77lorci«nf  $(cn£uy. 

'<m/i/wns3n7foru»rty.  2&y  %au/ent  Mvuiory  Sector?  7$nt/tre/v77&77utt/c< 


37  WILLIAM  STREET, 


mentioned  in  your  letters,  but  I  will  write  him  asking  him  to  send 
you  his  approval  of  the  French  Contract,  at  once,  for  I  do  not  see 

6-ec- t.c'  clCTLs  fe" 

how  you  WEH  form  a  Company  anyhow  when  we  have  no  Patents  there, 
except  the  Muljdpl expand  I  consider  that  you  deserve  great  credit 
for  putting  any  kind  of  a  fair  contract  through. 

In  regard  to  ordering  goods  from  us,  and  drawing  upon  the  bill 
•of  lading  here,  it  is  the  only  way  it  can  be  done  if  you;  want  to 
rely  upon  your  orders  being  filled  promptly. 

Yours  very  truly, 


Secretary. 


Psby.  10th,  laoo. 

Jo. 'in  E.  Searles,  Esq.,  President, 

</o  T.  F.  Hutchinson,  Esq., 
o/a  American  Cotton  Company, 

Memphis,  Tenn. 

I't  dear  SirJ- 

Mr  Mori  arty  hae  written  you  enelSBing  you 'a  copy  of  the 
Pencil  contract,  and  I  have  written  Mr  Mori  arty  to-day  cal' iru;  hj.s 
attention  to  one  or  tw  i-fnts  in  connection  with  it  in  relation 
tC' Patents,  prices  of  machinen,  etc,  but  in  order  that  there  may  bo 
no  delay  in  pushing  this  ,1‘Venchohsiness  to  a  concision,  will  you 
nor.,  if  you  have  not  already  done  30,  write  him  at  once  authorising 
bin  to  conclude  the-  negotiation  upon  the  lines  set  forth  in  the 
agreement,  for  he  understands  what  is  necessary  to  be  done,  and  he 
'hotiid  not  be  delayed  awaiting  your  approval. 

V®  cannot  afford,  to  lose  one  moments  time,  and  if  you  have 
siggestions  to  make  will  you  kindl*  let  me  know  what  they  are. 

'  wish  you  were  here  to  take  up  matters,  as  the  Phonograph 
Woiks  iave  assumed  their  old  time  independence. 

$  do  not  see  how  Mr  Moriarty  can  form  a  Company  on  any  condi- 
lions  in  Prance,  when  wo  have  no  patents  there,  so  please  do  not 
j  risk  delay. 


\ 


In  Mr  Moriarty's  letter  to  you  of  February  1st,  he  speaks  of 
preparing  n  new  Contract  for  the  Edison  Eell,  and  he  is  undoubtedly 
y/orking  on  this  now,  for  I  received  a  cable  to-day,  which,  reads  as 
follows 

"ARRANGING  REORfiAlttZATION  GIVE  NO  INFORMATION  WHATEVER  *T0 

"ANYONE  ABOUT  HEW  MACHINES'.  ■ 

I  suppose  he  roust  have  felt  afraid  that  we  might , write  some¬ 
thing  to  the  Edison  Bell  about  Edison's  new  machines. 

The  little  machine  Edison  is  making  is  out  now?  and  the  big 
one,  to  compete  with  the  big  Graphophone  Grand  you  saw^ will  be  out 
soon. 

I  wish  we  could  control  Edison  on  all  these,  things,,  but,  you,, 
can  do  a  lot  if  you  will: try. 

Yours  very  truly,  , 

Secretary. 


New  York,  February  17th,  1899. 


My  dear  Mr  Mori  arty: -PERSONAL. 

I  am  sorry  to  see  by  the  papers  to-day  the  announcement 
of  the  death  of  President  Faure,  and  I  enclose  you  a  clipping  from 
the  Morning  Sun,  to  show  you  what  the  papers  say  hero,  and/sincerely 
hope  that  this  will  not  affect  your  French  business,  but  it  has 
made  me  feel  a  little  anxious  about  it. 

A  am  glad  you  think  of  at  least  coming  over  in  the  Spring 
and  hope  that  all  your  various  negotiations  will  be  completed  by 
that  time. 

I  hope  you  will  be  able  to  get  rid  of  Annan  from  the 
Board,  and  I  have  just  heard  that  Hough  has  written  a  letter  to 
Bettini  within  a  week  or  so,  asking  for  information  in  regard  to 
various  Phonograph  matters. 

I  really  do  not  understand  why  The  Edison  Bell  permit  Hough 
to  act  independently  of  them,  unless  the  Board  of  Edison  Bell  think 
that  they  can  learn  something  about  the  business,  which  you  might 
not  wish  to  give  them. 

Why  do  you  not  put  a  stop  to  Hough  doing  any  business  whatever 
except  through  the  Board  of  the  Edison  Bell,  if  they  control  him, 
or  control  the  Edisoriia,  as  I  understand  they  do. 

I  will  explain  to  Mr  Searles  about  your  keeping  the  original 

While  I  think  of  it,  I  want  to  remind  you  that  you  must  calcu¬ 
late  upon  sufficient  time  to  manufacture  the  goods  when  you  give  us 


-2- 


an  order,  but  anticipate  your  orders,  so  that  there  will  be  no 
doubt  about  their  delivery^on  time. 


Yours  very  truly. 


York, 


February  17th,  1899. 


My  dear  Mr  Mori  arty: -PERSONAL. 

Referring  to  your  letter  of  February  4th,  I  note  your 
views  in  regard  toPr- -escott,  and  I  do  not  think  that  Mr  Searles 
would  do  anything  with  this  man,  without  letting  me  know,  at  least 
I  do  not  think  he  would  conclude  anything,  and  I  have  pointed  out 
to  him  the  necessity  above  everything  else  of  making  satisfactory 
terms  with  Edison,  and  that  the  probability  is  there  would  then  be 
no  need  whatever  for  Prescott. 

Still  I  note  all  your  views  o'fy.this  subject,  and  I  shall  take 
it  up  with  Mr  Searles  as  soon  as  he  gets  back,  and  try  to  induce 
him  to  go  immediately  out  to  see  Edison. 

In  regard  to  the  South  American  business,  I  have  written 
you  a  separate  letter  simply  for  the  purpose  of  criticising'  Article 
by  Article  the  Agreement  you  sent  us,  based  upon  what  knowledge 
we  have  lately  acquired  in  regard  to  this  territory,  for  you  doubt¬ 
less  realize  that  the  Commission  Merchants  in  New  York  City  have 
been  shov/n  how  cheap  they  can  buy  Phonographs?,  and  with  men  like 
Prescott,  who  have  been  manufacturing  supplies  independent  of 
Edison,  the  business-  is  by  no  means-  as  attractive  for  that  country 
as  it  was  when  you  were  here. 

So  much  depends  upon  Mr  Searles  proposed  interview  with  Mr 
Edison,  and  I  am  really  exasperated  at  the  delay,  and  we  have  been 
relying  upon  this  long  deferred  interview-  for  some  agreement  with 
Edison  which  would  help  our  business  for  South  America,  in  which 


case?  I  would  not  forget  your  Brother,  but  it  can  tally  be  done  by 
bringing  him  forward;  at  just  the  proper  time,  and  this  you  know  has 
not  tiet  arrived). 


Yours  very  truly, 


/ 


3/i0r/u0J$ Sx/tdoni  &.  7&ffikwdont  diecrefary. 

<$te/i/wil'^7/lmwrfy.  fix,  ZLuc/mit,  Mfint/em/vMJatt/ci  JZxi a«* 


Dear  Sir:- 

AUTOMATICS 

V/e  realize  that  you  do  not  consider  the  C-ress  invention 
as  a  decided  improvement,  and  that  if  you  do  anything  in  the  future 
with  an  Automatic  machine,  it  will  probably  be  the  small  Edison 
Slot  Phonographs,  also  that  you  think  there  will  be  very  little  use 
for  Gres s' s  machine. 

We  note  also,  that  should  Gress  attempt  to  invade  our  terri¬ 
tory,  that  the  "Customswwill  prove  a  strong  barrier. 

We  also  note?  that  you  would  have  Gress  understand  that  to 
intend  to  protect  our  rights,  etc:. 

In  reply  to  the  above,  we  desire  to  call  your  special  atten¬ 
tion  to  several  points  in  connection  with  our  contract  for  these 
Automatic  Machines,  and  after  this  letter^ll  ft*  endeavor  to  bore 
you  with  a  recital  of  these  facts. 

We  expected  to  see  Mr  Gress  to-day,  but  that  has  been  postponed 
until  to-morrow. 

In  our  contract  with  Gress,  we  undertook  certain  obligations*, 


'/l9P<£>.<$ea/r(ed,  7?raie/e>tt  CfftomaiJ&  S/Aban:  S  Secretary. 

<Mt€/i/wrt/3T7?t<rrM/rfy,  lae-  Seea/mt,  J&(vue>ry'3!crcctcr'  ItfntAre/tJ/t-.jutt/a  JA.at 


namely,  That  We  would  pay  them  a  Royalty  of  §5.00  per  machine’, 
for  five  years,  or  §5,000.  per  year,  and  that  whether  we  place 
orders  to  the  extent  of  5,000  machines  in  that  time’,  or  not,  this 
Royalty  must  be  paid. 

Gress  has  the  right  to  annul  the  Agreement,  if  the  Royalty 
is  not  paid?,  but  he  may  not  wish  to  annul  it,  even  though  we  should 
wish  it. 

Should  this  agreement  however  be  annulled  under  the  terms  of 
the  contract,  we  are  bound  to  return  to  him  his  Patents’  for  Great 
Britain,  France  and  Germany. 

Kindly  note  however-,  that  there  is  no  provision  in  regard  to 
the  Colonies  of  Great  Britain,  or  other  Countries-,  otitefrde  of  Great 
Britain,  France  and  Germany,  and  we  can  therefore’  keep  the  Patents 
for  such  Countries  irrespective  of  this  contract,  but  KINDLY  NOTE 
that  we  have  not  yet  received  those  Patents’,  although  they  have  been, 
applied  for,  and  nearly  all  paid  for,  therefore-  do  you  think  it 
wise  to  antagonise  Grass-,  and  you  know  the  kind  of  man  he  is-,  and 
run  the  risk  of  not  getting  the  Patents  we  have  paid  for. 

ANOTHER  POINT,  you  have’  agreed  to  deliver  to  the  Edison  Bell 


Consolidated  Phonograph  Company,  Limited;,  and  to  the  French  Company 
the  Multiplex  Patents-,  also  the  Company  for  the  Continent  of  Europe 
if  you  .complete  that^will  want  just  as  much  as  the  English  and 
French  Companies  in  the  way  of  Patents. 

Do  you  consider  it  safe  under  these  circumstances  to  run  the 
risl^and  indeed  it  is  more  than  a  risk,  it  is  a  fact,  of  losing  the 
Patents  on  account  of  the  non-fulfillment  of  our  Contract. 

We  have  not  made  any  attempt  to  alter  this  contract,  and  I  am 
afraid  that  we  would  not  have  much  success  if  we  did,  but  one  never 
knows  until  they  try,  still  as  we  stand  to-day,  does  it  not  seem  to 
you-  that  the  safest  and  best  policy  would  be  to  endeavor-  to  send  us 
an  order  for  Multiplex  machine*  for  youfc  two  Companies-,  and  educate 
them  to  the  advantageous  of  the  machine*,  rather  than  decry  it, until 
wo  can  see  our  way  to  make  a  different  sort  of  an  agreement  with 
Gres®. 

You  speak  of  keeping  Gress  out  of  our  territory,  do  you 
really  think  you  can,  if  X  felt  that  was  so,  I  should  have  no  anxiefc 
about  it  other  than  the  fact  that  we  would  be  obliged!  if  we  did  not 
pay  Royaltyto  losfe  our  Patent®, 


%/tJwwtATftoriariy,  flar  Zm<Woi/, 


S.  F.  Moriarty,  Esq., 
London,  England. 
Dear  Sir:- 


We  are  duly  in  receipt  of  a  eopy^of  the  proposed  contract 

with  the  Edison  Bell  Consolidated  Phonograph  Company,  Limited, 

out 

relating  to  South  America,  and  we  desire  to  point^to  you  what  we 
consider  important  defects  in  such  a  contract. 

In  the  first  place,  we  do  not  consider  South  America  of^great 
value  for  sales,  the  customers  from  that  section  are  unreliable, 
the  freight  charges  excessive,  and  must  be  prepaid,  and  the  goods 
must  be  paid  for  in  advance1  according  to  my  opinion^  it  will  also 
be  necessary  to  work  up  the  business,  and  divert«£"to  this  Cbmpany 
instead  of  through  the  channels  it  has  gone  heretofore,  but  this 
latter  is  not  at  all  an  impossibility,  if  we  stand  right  with  Ediso**. 
still  it  will  cost  something. 

Your  Agreement  gives  one-third  of  the  profits  to  the  Edison 
Bell  Company,  but  you  guarantee  a  certain  amount  per  machine  in  any 
event. 


This  guarantee  in  the  case  of  No.  2  Standard  Phonographs  is 
Pound’,  which  is  more  than  we  can  afford  at  the  present  cost  1 


The  prices  at  which  these  machines  are  sold  here,  is  40#  dis¬ 
count  or  §12.00  nett,  and  they  co3t  us  to-day  in  quantities  $9.00 
each,  therefore  you  will  see  how  impossible  it  is  to  guarantee  one 
Pound  on  each  machine. 

There  is  the  possibility  of  our  breaking  up  Prescott,  Stevens 
and  the  other  infringers,  but  it  is  contingent  upon  our  making 
satisfactory  and  reliable  terms  with  Edison,  even  then  wo  have  the 
Graphophone  Company  to  meet,  and  the  Gramophone?  will  be  heard  from 
also. 

Phonograph 

Under  the  present^si tuation  or  even  any  agreement  that  wo? 

might  make  with  Edison  I  do  not  consider  it  safe  to  guarantee  one 

cent,  however  we  note  that  you  will  not  accept  this  guarantee  pro¬ 
vision. 

In  addition  you  state  that  the  nett  profit  shall  be  the  differ 
ence  between  the  prime  cost  of  manufacture-  and  the  sale  price,  this 
is  a-  very  important  provision,  and  leaves  the  cost  of  running  the 
business  to  the  United  Company. 

Referring  to  Article  4  the  provisions  exacted  in  this  Article 
will  practically  kill  the  business^,  these  South  American  Merchants 
will  not  buy  Phonographs  or  accessories,  if  they  have  to  sign  any 
sort  of  a  paper  whatever*  When  a.  men  hnv»  a 


i//n/$.<§ear/4A  7?m<</cnC 
$te/i/iwv  37?lorrkrty,  7m/  Tfratt&mti 


(fJ/Zj/j 


27  WILLIAM  STREET. 


it,  he  wants  to  own  it,  otherwise  he  does  not  want  it.  This 
article  should  be  entirely  stricken  out. 

Article  6  requires  that  the  United  Company  shall  purchase  500 
Standard  Phonographs  within  12  months. 

X  think  this  would  be  taking  a  great  responsibility^for  we  do 
not  now  know  what  we  will  be  able  to  aeomplish  in  this  South  Ameri*<!«^i/ 
country,  or  how  we  will  stand  with  Edison. 

If  the  Consolidated  Company  wants  us  to  work  up  a  trade  in 
South  America,  we  must  have  the  right  to  do  so  in  our  own  way,  and 
on  such  conditions,  I  should  suppose  that  Mr  Searles  would  not 
hesitate  to  give  them  one-third  of  the  nett  profits,  this  is  the 
only  fair  way  we  can  conduct  this  business,  and  I  do  not  think  it 
can  be  done  in  any  other  way. 


Yours  very  truly. 


Secretary. 


S.F.Moriarty  Esq. 


(1) 


E.B. 


Dear  Mr  Moriarty, 


Gramophone . 


Tho  defendants  Solicitor  yesterday  ovoning  rang  mo  up  on 
the  telephone  and  I  had  a  long  conversation  with  him.  His  clients 
seem  to  bo  anxious  for  a  settlement  and  he  states  that  ‘they  aro  will- 
-ing,  if  terms  are  arranged,  to  have  their  boohs  investigated  by 
Messrs  Tlirquands  or  any  other  high  class  firm  of  accountants.  I 
pointed  out  to  him  that  we  did  not  admit  the  validity  of  the  patents 
under  which  his  clients  aro  working  and-  that  if  those  aro  not  valid 
they  really  have  nothing  to  aoll^  as  it  would  bo  compotont  for  any 
other  firm  to  commence  business  on  tho  same  linos.  de  replied  that 
ho'  did  not  admit  that  tho  patents  we ro  invalid,  but  on  tho  contrary, 
contonds  that  they  -would  bo  maintained  if  submitted  to  the  decision 
of  tho  courts.  flip  matter  is  ono  of  so  much  importance,  it  is 

so  essential,  if  any  arrangement  is  to  bo  made,  that  it  should  be 
concluded  without,  delay,  that  I  think  it  desirable  that  tho  parties 
should  meet  and  that  the  negotiations  should  not  continue  to  filter 
through  their  legal  advisers.  If  the  directors  s.00  Hr  Owen,  they 
will  be  in  a  better  position  to  foim  an  opinion  regarding  him,  and 
a  groat  deal  of  correspondence  and  waste  of  time  and  monpy  will  thus 
bo  avoided.  She  defendants  admit  that  their  motion  will  most  prob- 
-ably  be  dismissed  and  that,  it  is  quite  possible  that  it  may  be 


dismissed  with  costs.  They  are  therefore  negotiating  on  this  basis, 
and  I  personally  see  no  useful  object  in  postponing  the  negotiations 
until  after  the  defeat  has’ been  consummated.  Within  certain  limits 
the  parties  can  control  each  other,  but  they  cannot  control  the 
public,  and  I  am  convinced  that  the  trade  may  be  disturbed  to  such 
a  decree  that  it  will  be  impossible  to  resuscitate  it  if  fin  arrange- 
-ment  is  arrived  at.  In  other  words  the  parties  will  bo  "killing 
the  goose  that  lays  the  golden  egg " •  It  may  of  course  bo  impossible 
to  arrive  at  an  arrangement ,  but  I  think  that  the  attempt  should  bo 
made,  and  that, 'without  delay.  There  is  obviously  a  very  profitable 
trade  existing  in  the  Gramophone  and  if  this  company  can  obtain  the 
benefit  o£  it,  thoy  can  well  afford  to  mate  considerable  concessions 
with  that  object.  The  defendants  solicitor  states  that  his  clients 
would  like  to  meet  the  board  with  a  view  to  discussing  the  matter 
and  supplying  and  receiving  information.  Unless  the  directors  see 
any  objection  the  defendants  would  like  to  attend  at  tho  Companys 
office  on  Wednesday  at  such  time  as  may  bn  convenient  to  the  board. 

Will  you  kindly  let  mo  know  your  views,  and  I  tin  at  the  seme  time  writ- 
-ini;  to  the  othor  directors.  It  is  by  no  moans  certain  that' if  tho 
Gramophone  is  removed  from  the  field,  the  phonograph  Co  v/ill  succeed 
in  replacing  it  by  the  phonograph.  Of  course  if  the  basis  of  an 
arrangement  we Vo  arrived  at,  there  would  be  a  number  of  details 
requiring  careful  provision,  but  until  the  parties  have  come  together 
it  is  hardly  necessary  to  consider  those.  I  sincerely  hope  that 
if  a  meeting  does  take  placo  on  Wednesday,  you  will  be  able  to  attend 


S.F.Moriarty  Esq  '  (2) 


m,7 r.c. 


S.F.Moriarty  Esq 
Edison  House 


Northumberland  Avenue. 


■>/m/$.<$ea/r6ti),  7h.i«/cnt: 
<$Xc/l./wri/‘3'7?tenar{H,  Kayjftrju/mt 


3.  7&7/iloriit7n/,  $ec/r.i 'ary. 


E.  Mori  arty.  Esq. , 
London,  England. 


Dear  Sir:- 


Mr  Annan  has  just  called,  and  says  he  will  look  in  again. 
He  stated  that  he  had  just  received  a  cable-,  asking  him  to  find  out 
whether  we  had  shipped  the  No.  2  Phonographs’,  but  as  we  have  not 
there  was  nothing  else  to  say,  thah  that  we  had  not  shipped  them. 

He  also  asked  me  when  we  would  be  able  to  ship,  and  I  replied 
date’  without  looking  into  it, 
that  I  could  not  give  him  a  definite^  and  that  .1  should  have  to 

eommunicate  with  Mr  Searles.  He  then  asked  when  Mr  Searlea  would 
return,  and  I  said  in  about  ten  days’. 

He  asked  for  a  pen,  and  he  wrote  on  a  slip  of  paper  the 
following: - 

"Have  not  shipped;  any  of  the  balance  of  the  2550  :Np.’  Z  a  nd 
"Morison  does  not  know  when  they  can  ship  any." 

I  said  to  him,  it  would  be  a  mistake  to  cable  such  a 
message  as  that,  because  it  would  give  the  impression  that  we  were 
indifferent  as  to  when  we  would  ship,  and  he  said  he  would  think 
it  over,  therefore  I  think  I  shall  cable  you  myself  to-day. 

X  said  to  Mr  Annan  that  they  owed  us  a  great  deal  of  money, 
and  Annan  replied  that  when  Mr  ,hey  hafl 


come  to  an  agreement,  and  that  recently  all  matters  had  been  ad¬ 


justed,  and  I  remarked:  that  since  all  matters  had  been  adjusted,  I 
presumed  there  would  be  no  trouble  about  shipping  the  machines, 

I  simply  say  to  you  that  It  is  a  fact  that  Mr  Searles  has  been 
indifferent  about  shipping  these  No.  2  Machines,  but  I  did  not 
think  it  worth  while-  to  let  Annan  go  out  with  that  memorandum, 
without  saying  a  word  against  his  sending  such  a  cable. 

YoursP  very  truly, 


Secretary. 

P.S.  My  object  in  cabling  you  is  that  you  may  have  something  from 
us  just  as  recent  as  anything  Annan  might  cable,  and  also  that  you 
may  be  prepared  for  any  surprise  that  the  Board  might  spring  on  you 
on  Wednesday.  The  fact  of  my  mentioning  Annan,  will  show  you 
he  has  caUed,  also  that  you  may  know  that  the  machines  are  not 
shipped  to  date. 

Mr  Searles  would  not  ship  them  because  the  Edison  Bell  owff 
us  so  much  now. 


Jfo/wi/S.^eairteii,  7&cit</cnK  37i0nuMJ& Sdtiiont  & 7t$farit0nt  dtwntwry. 

<§te/i/imv^7fona>rfy,  7J*r  Z^d>ni  Jtk&ny  3>7rcct»*  T/Jtnt/tre/iMjutt/a 


London,  England. 
Dear  Sir!- 


We  sent  to  Mr.Searles1  by  special  delivery  mail,  Saturday 
night,  February  18th,  1899,  a  Power  of  Attorney  in  your  favor,  whib/f' 
we  had- preparedi  that  day  for  his  signature1  to  enable  you  to  carry 
out  the  French  contract,  and  he  must  have  received  it  this  morning 
for  he  telegraphed  us  as  follows: - 

"Cannot  accept  French  contract  as  written,  await  my  letter". 

We  understand  from  this  that  he  objects  to  approving  the  memo¬ 
randum  of  contract  for  the  French  Company,  but  will  write  you  more 
fully  when  we  get  his  letter. 

We  are  sorry  there  is  any  delay  in  this  matter,  as  it  is  liable, 
to  kill  the  contract,  and  an  order  for  5,000  machines  would  enable 
us  to  make  a  nice  sum  of  money,  but  I  suppose  he  may  have  been  dis¬ 
appointed  in  not  embodying  in  thafc  contract  the  Jfl5,000.  heretofore 
referred  to. 

We  are  just  in  receipt  of  a  letter  from  Mr  Searles  in  reply 
to  my  letter  to  him,  stating  that  he  cannot  possibly  reach  home- 
before  the  end  of  the  month,  but  that  he  is  anxious  to  do  so  at 
the  earliest  pose-i^i.  *■  1/Lty -findy 


^%/imt$.$eartea,  %vn</en£  3%onuitJ& $x/<Aoni  &  7i77lorii(fm  tiainfartf. 

<§ti/i/mt/^7?lomvrtyJwWni>utsHt  Gfimxfon'  ZdinfAn>/v7?ii'/utl/c(  JrauwmK 


27  WILLIAM  STREET, 


S.  F.  Moriarty,  Esq., 
London,  England. 
Dear  Sir:- 


'Ttez/j^or/,^ 


*./M L 


We  cannot  understand  why  it  is  that  you  write  ,  "you 
cannot  understand  from  the  information  we  have  sent  you  whether 
these  Records  which  cost%  35  cents;,  are  original  Records',  or  if 
they  are  better  records  than  those;  you  have  paid  20  cents  for,  and 
what  the  reason  is  for  the  difference  in  price." 

We  wrote  you  January  17th  that  the  prices  we  would  be  obliged 
to  pay  fbr  Duplicates?,  was  25  cents'  for  Issler's  Holding  &  Gilmore' 
Bands,  and  we  cabled  you  on  January  23rd,  that  Records  will  cost 
the  Edison  Bell  Company  35  cents,  and  stating  that  we  would  await 
your  remittance  before  executing  order-,  therefore',  it  seems  tan 

o-tASis'  CmA/Ts  TC'AAA)  <7o 

clear  to  us  that  the  35  cents  named  in  cablej^refer^^  to  the 
prices  we  would  charge  the  Edison-Bell  in  consequence'  of  the- cost 
to  us  of  25  centsr  each  for  the  Records  referred  to  in  our  letter 

of  January  17th,  namely  Duplicates?. 

&7&W  uuvlxs 

SINCE  THE  ABOVE^HW  WRITTEN,  we  te-made^an  extra  effort  to  get 
the  cost  to  us  down,  and  succeeded  in  purchasing  them  for  19  cents 
each, ^  but  as  the  quotation  has  been  agreed  to  of  35  cents  to  the 
Edison  Bell,  we  will  not  make  any  lower  price  to  them  on  account  of 


jo/n,$.<$earU  0»M*e  JZmaMt &%&********? 

<§te/Jieri/7F7/fonartt/,  ?<vs  7tr.ut/»n&  Mvaory  greetin'  Wnt/nv/i,7MjuUlnf 


our  being  able  to  buy  them  for  six  cents  less  than  the  original 
quotation  to  us  by  the  manufacturers. 


Our  reason  for  maintaining  this  price  of  35  cents,  is  that 
the  Records  have  turned  out  to  be  a  great  deal  better, than  the 
samples  we  first  heard,  for  we  discovered  that  the  manufacturers 
showed  us  on  our  first  visit  some  inferior  Records  in  the  hope'  that 
we  would  purchase’  originals*  instead  of  Duplicates,  but  on  the  second 
visit  we  found  the  Duplicates  so  much  better  as  stated'. 

Yours  very  truly: 


Secretary. 


27  WILLIAM  STREET. 


/MM/JAOrA'y Fe  b  y .  21  st,  1899.^fl.‘ 
Stephen  F.  Moriarty,  Esq.,  Vice-Presidem, 

London,  "England. 

Dear  Siir:- 

We  have  just  had  a  call  fVom  R.  G.  Dunn  &  Co.,  and  in 
reply  to  their  request,  vre  gave  them  the  named.  of  the  Officers, 
because  I  believe’  they  have  had  this  before,  anyhow  it  is  public 
information. 

He  asked  what  interest  Mr  Searles  had  in  the  Company,  and  I 
replied  that  Ipreferred  not  to  answer  that  question,  without  referr 
ing  to  Mr  Searles. 

He  then  said,  well  I  tell  you  just  what  my  inquiry  is,  which 
came  to  us  in  a  very  vague?  way,  namely  a  report  that. the  Company 
was  in  financial  difficulties.  I  said  I  cannot  imagine  who  could 
have  originated  such  a  report  as  that,  because  the  Company  asks  for 
no  particular  credit,  he  asked  whether  the  Company  had  any  bonded' 
indebtedness-,  I  said  it  had  not. 

Do  you  suppose-  this  inquiry  was  made  by  Annan  or  the  French 
people-.  It  might  have  come  from  the  Herrmann  Furniture  &  Plumbers 
Cabinet  Works,  from  whom  we  ordered  the  CabinetB,  and  they  are 

/ 


strangers  to  l 


Subject 

R.C  .  WYATT. 


46  '■■■'/'/orHg '.u/fs£fy.ec/?. 

/d  / 

<>y/^y/?SrA-  FebytlQflff? 


Bear  Lord  Eeribigh, 

At  yesterday’s  Board  we  had  to  settle  various 
questions  Between  ourselves  and  the  Edison  United  and  Mr. 
Moriarty. 

(1)  Rent.  This  is  going  to  he  settled  today  by  cheque  A 

is  perfectly  satisfactory,  though  X  do  not  see  why  the  invoice 
from  us  to  them  for  repairs  on  automatics  should  not  be 
brought  into  the  settlement  .  It  is  no  more  sprung  on 
them  than  the  invoice  for  use  of  basement  was  on  us. 

(8)  Cabinets.  For  this  amount, plus  all  charges,  we  are  to 

receive  a  cheque  or  remittance  within  ten  days.  If  this  is 
done  it  is  quite  satisfactory. 

(3)  475-Typeg-  paid  for  in  January.  I  do  not  think  the  reply 

or . explanation  giyen  us  was  satisfactory,  and  I  think  it 
would  be  in  the  interest  of  the  Edison  United,  as  well  as  of 
our  Company  ,  that  a  reasonable  explanation  should  be  given 
why  an  order;  sent  by  mail (for  goods  paid  for)  about  the 
SRth  January  has  to  be  cabled  for  again  on  the  22nd.  February 
Records.  The  remarks  apply  with  more  force  to  this 
question,  but  the  reply  given  that  we  had  stopped  shipment 
should  be  substantiated  by  documentary  evidence,  as  I  cannot 
but  think  that  Mr.  Moriarty  is  mistaken.  The  facts  are 
that  since  July  we  have  not  been  able  .to  get  a  record  or 
blank,  which  is  a  distinct-  breach  of  the  contract  ,  that  records 


(8) 

are  the  life  of  the  business,  and  that  ho  change  of  management 
could  help  a  business  so  handicapped.  We  ought  to  know 
why  this  has  happened  and  get  reasonable  assurance  .that  it  will, 
not  happen  again  .  1  think  also  that  the  Board  should  insist 

'and  Mr.  Moriarty  assist,  that  in  his  absence  there  are  people 
who  can  and  may  give  us  the  proper  information  as  to  orders , 
shipments  &c.  1  did  not  press  .this  question  further  .  at 

yesterday’s  board:  - 

(1)  It  had  already  lasted  nearly  four  hours. 

(S)  It  was  evident  that  Mr.  Smith  strongly  desired  me  not 

to  press  it  then. 

5$(  I  wanted  to  give  a  night’s  thought  to  it  .  ■ 

Having  done  the  latter,  I  have  come  to  the  conclusion  that 
as  far  as  I  am  concerned  any  settlement  that  does  not  embrace 
proper  explanations  of  the  above  points  will  be  unsatisfactory 
Mr.  Moriarty  said  to  me  afterwards  that  in  order  to 
make  more  unity  on  the  Board  he  had  friends  who  would  pay 
out  Mr.  Annan,  myself,  and  our  personal  friends  at  par,  with 
interest,  if  we  would  resign  in  their  favour.  I  replied 
,  that  I  would  resign  anytime  that  I  was  convinced  the  share¬ 
holders  would  benefit-  thereby  •,  but  that  neither  Mr.  Annan 
or  I  could  voluntarily  resign  until  all  those  who  had  sub¬ 
scribed  on  the  faith  of  the  prospectus  bearing  our  names  had 
received  the  offer  .  I  thought  this  was  only  about  £40; 000 
He  replied  that  he  thought  he  could  arrange  it. 

Should  this  be  done  my  resignation,  and  I  believe  Mr.  Annan’s, 
will  be  forthcoming  at  once  . 


(3) 

I  have  felt  it  my  duty  to  write  this  letter  and  to  send 
a  copy  to  my  colleagues 

Believe  me," 

Yours  very  sincerely 

(signed)  Robert,  c.  VTyatt 


P.S 

Gramaphone.  1  heartily  approve  the  decision  we  arrived, 
at  yesterday.  it  was  the  only  possible  one  in  my  opinion  . 


New  York,  February  24th,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriarty: -PERSONAL. 

In  looking  over  the  telegram'  sent  you  February  23rd, 
where  we  referred  to  our  letter  of  February  16th,  we  realise  that 
perhaps  it  might  not  have  been  perfectly  clear,  as  it  gives  the 
impression  that  my  letter  of  February  16th,  was  written  at  the 
instigation  of  Mr  Searles,  whereas  IT  Y/AS  NOT. 

The  first  part  of  the  telegram,  we  sent  you  because  Mr 
Searles  wrote  us  directing  us  to  wire-  you  in  that  way,  but  he  did 
not  know  that  I  had  written  you  on  February  16th,  and  I  merely  put 
that  in,  because  the  letter  will  reach  you  in  a  day  or  two,  and  I 
thought  it  would  do  no  harm  if  you  would  just  compare  these  figures 
with  the  prices  you  have  set  for  the  French  Company. 

Mr  Searles  criticism  of  the  French  Contract,  and  my  suggestion 
in  my  letter,  were  entirely  independent  of  each  other,  and  Mr 
Searles  does  not  know  to-day,  the  contents  of  that  letter,  except 
a  small  portion  of  which  I  have  since1,  say  oil  February  23rd’  given 
him,  commencing  on  page  2  of  that  letter  with  the  words  ARTICLE  3 
and  ending-  on  page  3\  with  the  words  SHOULD  TO  PLACE  AN  ORDER  IN 
THE  IUTURTT. 

Yours,  very  truly, 

/  (/  t  vi  0-1 


[ENCLOSURE] 


John  1?.  Searles. 

27  William  Street. 
New  York. 


Private  Car  "Iolanthe”, 

En  Route,  Little  Rock,  Ark. 
February  20,  1899. 


Mr  George  N.  Morrison,  Secretary, 
Edison  United  Phonograph  Company, 
27  William  Street, 

New  York  City. 


Dear  Sir:- 


I  am  in  receipt  of  your  letters,  also  those  of  Mr 
Moriarty  in  re_  French  and  English  contracts.  I  have  read  the 
contract  very  carefully,  but  cannot  consent  to  its  execution  as 
written,  particularly  in  Section  3,  providing  for  the  same  price1 
and  terms  as  made  to  the  Edison- Bell  Company,  England.  As  you  know 
the  pricesin  this  contract  are  wrong  in  two  or  three  particulars 
and  have  been  the  subject  of  controvercy  and  amendment,  and  we  do 
not  know  today  where  we  stand  under  same.  It  is  quite  probable  tba 
the  reduction  of  the  price  on  the  first  order  to  S9.  for  one  half 
the  order  could  be  construed  as  part  of  the  contract  or  a  modifies 
tion  of  the  same,  which  would  fix  a  price  for  No.  2  machines- 
below  what  we  should  be  willing  to  sell  them  at.  Wire-  M.  that 
"price1  in  contract  should  be  definite  and  entirely  independent  of 
English  Company". 


Reference  is  made  in  Section  5  to  a  schedule  of  machines1 
ordered,  which  is  not  included  in  the  papers  sent  me.  If  you  have 
a  copy  of  same,  please  forward  it. 


recognise  the  necessity  of  pushing  uus  mailer  to  an  ear 

question.0 as  ms  h&V?  anythins  left  °Pen  to 

fruitful  of  trouble?  I  shill  be  coftra“t*  which  has  been  so 
meanwhile1,  matters  in  London  ?  I  ab0Ut  ten  *****  and  if 

be  able  to  take  up  matter*  Pail3,have  been  arranged',  shall 

.  up  matters  with  out  friend  in  Orange  and  come  to 


[ENCLOSURE] 

-2- 

some  adjustment.  X  have  not  yet  had  time  to  read  carefully-  the 
new  agreement  with  the  London  Company,  but  will  take  same  up 
later. 

Yours  very  t  ruly. 


( Sgd. ) 


Jno.  K.  Searles- 


New  York,  February  24th,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriarty: -PERSONAL. 

V/e  are  just  in  receipt  of  a  letter  from  Mr  Searles,  which  is 
dated  February  21st,  and  it  jsays  "Your  letter  with  Power  of  Attorny 
"received’,  it  is  already  too  late  to  get  this  off  by  Wednesday's 

"steamer.  I  will  look  it  over  in  time  to  send  it  to  you  for 
// 

"Saturday' s. 

When  we  wrote  you  February  20th,  we  were  under  the 
impression  that  Mr  Searles  had  received  the  Power  of  Attorney  I 

y-wist/ 

sent  him,  February  lSth^bht  from  this  letter  just  received  to-day, 
I  conclude  he  l?cl  not  received  it,  when  his  letter  to  us  was  written 
of  February  21stJ  however  the  Power  of  Attorney  has  not  yet  been 
received,  although  if  we  get  it  to-morrow  morning,  we  can  catch 


You  will  kindly  notice  that  the  above  letter  of  February  21st 
from  Mr  Searles,  was  written  the  day  after  he  sent  us  the  following 
telegram,  which  is  dated  February  20th,  and  reads 

"Cannot  accept  French  contract  as  written.  Await  my  letter". 

We  attach  copy  of  Mr  Searles  letter  of  February  31th, 


which  was  written  the  same  day  as  the  above  telegram,  but  kindly 
note  that  the  letter  received  this  morning  was  dated  the  day  after. 

Upon  receipt  of  Mr  Searles  letter  of  February  20th,  above 
referred  to,  we  sent  him  a  copy  of  your  cable  of  February  22ndi, 
which  was  a  holiday  with  us,mand  I  called  Mr  Searles  attention  to 
the  fact  that  the  475  Type  2  Machines  had  been  paid  for, and  the 
ey  used  hy  us  for  other  purchases/ 


-2- 

I  am  in  hopes  of  hearing  from  him  that  we  can  ship  these 

I  also  made-  in  this  letter  to  Mr  Searles  request  for  the 
execution  of  the  Power  of  Attorney,  and  it  reads  as  follows: - 

"Do  you  not  think  it  would  be  wiser  to  execute  the  Power  of 
"Attorney  ibr  the  French  Contract,  as  sent  you,  and  write  a  letter 
"setting  forth  your  stipulations  in  the  matter,  because  in  any  even/* 
"we  must  give  him  such  a  power  of  attorney,  as  will  enable  him  to 
"modify  the  contract  or  add  to  it,  as  circumstances  require!,  and 
"we  will  have  the  advantage  of  gaining  time- 

"The  remainder,  if  not  agreed  to,  can  be  arranged  by  cable. 

"You  know  with  all  the  competitors  against  us  in  this  business,  and 
"no  French  Patents,  this  will  probably  be  our  last  chance  for  that 
"territory,  therefore  I  strongly  advocate  immediate  action  in  the 
"premi  sea-.  " 

X  have  just  telegraphed  Mr  Searles-  upon  receipt  by  us  of  your 
cable  of  February  24th,  as  follows: - 

"HOPE  YOU  WILL  SEND  POWER  OF  ATTORNEY  JUST  AS  WRITTEN.  MORTARW 
"CABLES!  PRICES  TYPE  2  DEFINITELY  FIXED  FRENCH  CONTRACT  $10.  NO  * 
REFERENCE  ANY  KIND  TO  EDI  SOM  BELL  MADE  IN  CONTRACT".' 

Yours  very  truly. 


27  WILLIAM  Slffitl, 


NEWYORfe- 

Private  Car  "Iolanthe", 

Bn  Route,  Atlanta,  Ga. ,  - 
February  25th,  1899, 

S.  F.  Moriarty,  Esq., 

Edison  House, 

Northumberland  Avenue, 

London,  W.  C.,  England. 

Dear  Sir:- 

I  am  in  receipt  of  your  forwarded  letters  of  the  1st,  4th, 

8th  and  11th  inst.,  and  have  read  same  with  care.  X  have  also  re¬ 
ceived  through  Mr.  Morrison  a  power  of  attorney  for  execution. 

Edison- Bo 11. 

Regarding  the  South  American  business,  the  proposed  contract 
is  very  unsatisfactory.  Mr.  Morrison  has  sent  me  a  copy  of  his  letter 
to  you  of  the  11th  inst.,  which  very  well  covers  the  points  of  objec¬ 
tion,  and  I  quite  agree  with  him  that  any  contract  with  the  J5-B  Com¬ 
pany  is  impracticable  on  the  lines  stated.  Under  no  circumstances  are 
we  prepared  to  make  any  gurantees,  nor  will  we  allow  any  part  of  their 
contract,  for  10,000  machines  to  be  applied  on  the  South  American 
business.  It  is  not  going  to  be  an  easy  matter  to  divert  this  South 
American  trade  from  the  people  who  now  control  it  here,  for,  while  they 
are  doing  an  illegitimate  business,  they  are  well  intrenched,  and  it 
will  not  be  worth  our  while  to  spend  any  time  in  fighting  with  them 
unless  we  are  to  be  foot-free  to  conduct  the  business  according  to  our 
best  judgment,  and  so  far  as  determining  the  basis  of  profit  iw  con¬ 
cerned,  we  should  want  the  profit  calculated  as  the  difference  between 
the  price  the  English  Company  pay  us  and  the  net  amount  received.  They 
cannot  expect  to  get  a  profit  on  any  other  basis  than  the  basis  on  which 
they  themselves  would  purchase  the  goods.  It  seems  to  me  scarcely  worth 
while  to  spend  anymore  time  on  this  feature  of  the  E-B  Company's  bus¬ 
iness  until  you  get  the  reorganisation  whi.ch  you  say  you  expect  to  ac- 


John  E.  Searles, 

^ S.F.M.,  No.  2,  2/25/99. 

complish  in  that  Company.  At  that  time,  with  business  men  to  deal  with, 
it  should  be  easy  either  to  develop  from  your  side  a  South  American 
Company  to  handle  this  business,  or  to  get  a  contract  which  will  be 
fair  to  us  to  handle  it.  I  hope  you  are  not  doomed  to  disappointment 
in  your  plans,  confidentially  stated,  for  the  reorganization  of  the 
E-B  Company,  for  really  this  lies  at  the  bottom  of  all  future  business 
in  Great  Britain. 

I  note  that  you  will  forward  the  official  document  properly 
executed  closing  up  all  the  old  matters,  and  that  from  this  time  on, 
you  will  aggressively  seek  to  come  to  a  financial  settlement.  In 
the  absence  of  any  cable  from  you  this  week  regarding  automatics  or 
remittance,  I  assume  that  the  hoped  for  action  by  the  Board  on  Y/ednes- 
day  has  not  been  consummated.  The  delay  in  the  matter  of  the  automatics 
is  not  only  unbusiness  like,  but  appears  to  me  to  be  a  studied  scheme 
to  prevent  the  payment  of  money  to  us.  If  you  can  get  business  men 
in  charge  of  this  Company  it  will  be  an  immense  relief. 

I  hear  that  Hough  has  ordered  some  50  M.  machines,  which  I 
presume  are  for  the  E-B  Company.  Of  course,  this  must  be  with  the 
connivance  of  Pratt  and  the  managing  directors,  and  is  of  a  piece 
with  action  disclosed  in  your  letters  of  the  11th  inst. 

Germany. 

I  hope  this  matter  will  be  brought  to  a  head  soon.  It  has 
become  very  tedious  as  well  as  unsatisfactory,  and  it  seems  as  though 
with  the  evidenc^in  their  hands,  our  attorneys  ought  to  be  able  to  bring 
things  to  a  head  without  further  delay. 

France ■ 


I  have  a  telegram  from  Mr.  Morrison  stating  that  you  have 


27  WL4MM  SWEET- S’ 

NftrroHtc.' 

S.F.M.,  No.  3,  2/25/99. 

cabled,  him  to  the  effect  that  the  price  of  Type  2.  machines  for  Prance 
has  been  definitely  fixed  at  §10.  and  that  no  reference  of  any  kind 
is  made  in  the  contract  to  the  Edison-Bell. Company,  prom  this  I 
judge  that  a  new  contract  must  have  been  prepared,  inasmuch  as  paragraph 
3  of  the  contract  sent  to  me  expressly  provides  that  the  prices  on  all 
the  French  business  shall  be  "at  the  same  prices,  and  giving  them  the 
same  privileges  that  are  given  to  the  Edison-Bell  Company  and  the 
Consolidated  Phonograph  Company  of  London,  according  to  the  schedule 
list  of  prices  which  is  designated  as  the  Third  Schedule  in  the  con¬ 
tract  made  between  &c,  &c,  which  schedule  sets  out  in  full  the  prices 
arranged  for  the  machines  and  accessories".  There  is  no  other 
reference^  to  prices  in  the  contract.  Moreover,  in  paragraph  5,  ref¬ 
erence  is  made  to  an  attached  schedule  showing  the  distribution  of 
5000  machines  ordered,  etc.  There  was  no  schedule  attached  to  the  con¬ 
tract  as  forwarded  to  me. 

As  I  stated  in  my  letter  to  Mr.  Morrison,  which  he  has  no 
doubt  communicated  to  you,  I  am  not  willing  that  anything  in  the  French 
contract  should  allude  to,  or  be  predicated  upon,  our  dealings  with  the 
English  Company,  otherwise  we  may  be  in  the  future  unpleasantly  complica¬ 
ted,  and  litigation  result.  Have  a  new  and  clean  schedule  made  for  the 
French  Company  absolutely  independent  of  any  other,  so  that  the  contract 
shall  be  self  contained  and  final. 

I  note  by  your  letter  that  there  is  a  clear  understanding 
regarding  cash  payment  for  shares,  notwithstanding  same  is  not  expressed 
in  this  contract. 

The  A.  C.  Co. 

I  have  read  with  interest  everything  you  have  written  regard- 


ftw'tiroc. 

S.F.M.,  No.  4,  2/25/99. 

ing  this  business  in  your  letters  of  the  1st,  4th,  8th  and  11th  inst. 

My  trip  through  the  South  has  been  almost  an  ovation  in  view  of  the 
interest  in,  and  popularity  of,  the  round  bale.  The  success  of  this 
business  has  been  assured  beyond  question,  and  the  number  of  presses 
which  we  shall  be  able  to  put  out  for  the  next  crop,  is  only  limited 
by  the  utmost  capacity  of  the  works  in  Chicago,  which  are  now  being 
run  day  and  night.  I  am  very  greatly  embarrassed  by  the  delay  on  the 
part  of  our  English  friends.  I  now  wish  that  the  business  had  never 
been  proposed  to  them,  as  in  such  case,  I  should  before  this  have 
completed  a  syndicate  here  to  control  the  business  and  have  the^noney 
in  hand.  I  ought,  in  justness  to  myself,  to  close  the  deal  on  your 
side  and  take  action  here  immediately,  but  your  letters  from  time  to 
time  have  been  so  confident  that  the  matter  v/ould  be  soon  consummated,  and 
in  view  of  the  possible  future  business  with  Lord  Farquhar  and  his 
friends  in  other  and  most  important  lines  which  1  know  to  be  entirely 
feasible  provided  they  are  desirous  of  such  a  connection,  I  have  held 
the  matter  open  until  now  daily  expecting  to  hear  from  you  that  the 
matter  was  finally  closed.  You  must  certainly  admit  that  I  have  given 
you  every  reasonable  opportunity  to  consummate  the  business,  and  that  I 
am  entirely  justified  in  withdrawing  it  unless  it  is  immediately  con¬ 
cluded. 

I  now  expect  to  reach  New  York  on  the  3rd  of  March  after  a 
five  week's  absence,  stopping  on  my  way  at  Baltimore  to  complete  the 
organization  of  the  new  trust  company  referred  to  in  my  letter  of  a 
fortnight  or  more  ago.  This  is  destined  to  be  a  very  important  and 
profitable  business,  and  j  hoped  to  see  our  English  friends  participate 
in  it  also,  but  inasmuch  as  they  have  not  completed  the  Ootton  Company 


27  WMtHMsSTBEET, 

N£*r«JHT  ... 

S.E.M.,  No.  5,  2/25/99. 

master,  I  presume  you  have  not  presented  this  to  them.  Since  my  release 
from  the  detail  of  the  Sugar  Company  and  the  Bank,  I  have  had  timejto 
consider  some  other  matters  which  otherwise  I  could  not  have  done,  and 
I  am  in  a  position  to  control  to  mutual  advantage,  some  very  important 
and  profitable  business  matters  in  which  English  capital  might  very 
profitably  be  interested,  but  if  the  slowness  evinced  in  the  A.  0. 
Company  transaction  is  characteristic  of  all  business  on  your  side,  it 
renders  impossible  any  such  connection,  as,  in  the  best  things  which 
transpire  here,  it  usually  happens  that  prompt  action  is  the  condition 
on  which  they  are  secured.  I  beg  of  you  not  to  allow  this  matter  to 
drag  any  longer,  but  give  me  immediately  on  my  return,  either  an 
absolute  settlement  of  the  business  or  a  withdrawal  of  the  proposition. 


New  York,  February  28th,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriarty: -PERSONAL. 

I  have  at  last  received  permission  fVom  Mr  Searles  to 
ship  the  475  Type  No.  2  Phonographs,  and  they  will,  go  forward  per 
the  Atlantic  Steamship  Line,  Saturday,  March  4th. 

I  am  aiiso  in  receipt  of  a  letter  from  him  ,  a  copy  of  which  X 
enclose,  upon  receipt  of  which  today,  I  cabled  you. 

I  have  also  written  him, as  follows 

.  "*n  reference  to  the  French  Contract,  T  do  not  understand'  that 
this  is  the  final  and  complete  contract,  but  gives  the  terms  as 
"near  as  possible  at  that  time. 

"I  think  in  all  probability  there  will  be  some  changes  as  to 
"details,  but  the  general  terms  of  the  contract  will  probably  not 
"be  changed;,  and  I  understand  his  telegram  to  mean  that  the 
"reference'  to  the  Edison  Bell  contract  has  been  stricken  out." 

"Doubtless  also  there  v/ill  be  a  clause  inserted'  in  regard  to 
"manufacturing  rights,  and  the  object  in  sending  on  this  memorandum 
"oTAgreement  was  in  order  that  no  time  should  be  lost."" 


{  <>  >  , 

expect  him  to  return  home  March  4th  or  6th. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


John  F.  Searles 
27  William  Street. 

Hew  York.  Private  Car  "lolanthe", 

Fn  Route,  Atlanta,  Ga. 

February  25th,  1899. 

Mr.  0.  M.  Morrison,  Secretary, 

27  William  Street, 

New  York  City. 

Dear  Sir:- 

Your  telegram  of  yesterday  received  on  my  arrival  here 
this  morning.  I  notice'  what  you  say  regarding  prices  in  the  French 
contract.  This  it  totally  at  variance  with  the  contract  itself  in 
the  third  paragraph.  I  do  not  know  what  to  make  of  it.  If  a  new 
contract  has  been  made,  which  must  be  the  ease  if  the  cable  is 
correct,  we  should  have  the  new  contract  before  authorizing  it  to 
be  closed.  Try  and  ascertain  the  facts  by  cable  before  wo  go  any 
further. 

Yours  very  truly, 

(sgd. )  Jno.  F.  Searles. 


JTtomMj/;  S//tho>K  &  7l.7?l<»‘i4ent  $ce*t&vn 


J  Tffrrwrfy,  fay  Mviu>ri,  Erector.'  T^ndn/lsflij/uti/et  Jfa 

nr 

Vjrn/m/rm, 


27  WILLIAM  STREET. 


5.  F.  Moriarty,  Bsq. , 
London,  England. 
Dear  Sir:- 


The  regular  Annual  meeting  of  the  Stockholders  of  this 
Company  was  held  March  Gth,  1899  at  the  office  of  the  Company  at 
Oarnge,  New  Jersey,  and  the  following  gentlemen  were  elected 
Directors  to  serve  for  the  ensuing  year. 

Mr  John  R.  Searles. 

Mr  Stephen  F.  Moriarty. 

Mr  Henry  G.  Marquand. 

Mr  Thomas  C.  Platt. 

Mr  G.  II.  Mori  son. 

Mr  Winthrop  M.  Tuttle. 

Mr  George  V.'.  Oakley. 

Mr  J.  T.  McChesney. 

Mr  Samuel  M.  Robinson. 

Mr  Robinson  is  now  located  in  Philadelphia,  and  some  one  else 
will  no  doubt  be  appointed  in  his  place  in  due  course'. 

The  meeting  passed  off  quietly. 


Yours^very  truly. 


Secretary. 


14.  Austinfriars. 

''A^ar-tOL+iCy 

*^-t—  -a-c-c^-ej«_ 

■&+*-  v  !/C-^n>-»-co'c JJ.  -iCv  4,-e~.oC 
'S~o  &-* ^au^o^L*, 

cyLejL  ^ 

AtJte-  £&Wt 


Enclosed  I  send  you  copy  letter  received  from  Mr  Bettcher. 
With  your  approval  I  propose  to  write  to  Mr  Horrwitz  partner  desiring 
him  to  take  the  matter  up  and  to  at  once  institute  and  prosecute 


with  all  possible  vigor  the  contemplated  proceedings  against  Mr 
Stollwerck,  the  other  directors,  and  the  German  Co.  I  shall  be 


S.E.Moriarty  Esq. 

Edison  House 


Northumberland  Avenue, 


(Bhisan^ansu  |E@) 
iRtfrilmmlrjerlanjtr  SUyjenxxje, 
ICxrjtjErxw, 


IOth  March  1899. 

Dear  Mr  Moriarty, 

I  have  no  news  from  you  this  morning,  and  there  is 
nothing  much  of  importance  to  write  about. 

I  enolas  e  you  herewikt/i  a  cable  message  which  has  just  come  in, 
and  as  you  will  get  this  letter  first  thing  in  the  morning  I  have  not 
cabled  it  as  it  is  a  long  message,  and  you  will  get  the  letter  in  a 
few  hours  now. 

I  also  enclose  you  copies  of  two  letters  received  from  the  Edison- 
Bell  Co:.  We  have  only  an  additional*  order  from  tnem  for  85000  blanks 
and  on  my  pointing  this  out  to  Mr  Pratt  he  adnitted  his  mistake  and 
told  me  that  an  official  order  would  be  sent  forthwith  for  the  other 
85000  making  the  50000  mentioned  in  the  letter.  If  you  will  let  me 
know  in  the  morning  and  you  wish  a  cable  message  to  be  sent  I  will 
draw  out  the  necessary  cable  and  get  the  mone*  from  them,  as  obviously 
this  is  a  matter  for  them  to  pay  for,  and  unless  the  money  is  got 
beforehand  they  will  raise  all  sorts  of  objections  afterwards. 

The  other  letter  shows  the  spirit  they  are  acting  in  now,  and 
demand  payment  in  advance  for  outlays  that  heretofore  have  been, 
debited  to  our  account,  as  is  usual  in  such  matters  between  Companies 
doing  business  with  each  other.  I  will  do  nothing  in  this  matter  until 
your  return  and  will  remind  you  of  this  matter  then. 

There  is  nothing  else  I  can  think  of  to  write  you  about  to-day. 
Yours  very  truly. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


KDISON-BELL  CONSOLIDATED  PHONOGRAPH  COJ  LTD. 
39  Charing  Cross  Road.  W.C. 

9th  March,  .1899. 


The  Edison  United  Phonograph  Co: 

Edison  House, 

Northumberland  Avenue.  W.C. 


Dear  Sirs, 

With  reference  to  the  blanks  on  order,  we  understand  thfit 
you  have  so  far  only  ordered  forward  the  thirty  thousand  barrels 
of  the  first  lot,  and  we  shall  be  much  obliged  if  you  will  kindly 
cable  for  than  to  ship  the  fifty  thousand  afterwards  ordered  as 
early  as  possible. 

At  the  present  time  we  have  not  a  single  Record  in  the 
place  except.  Master  Records,  and  Edisonia  is  in  as  bad  a  state 
for  want  of  Blanks,  and  therefore  you  will  see  the  urggioy  of 
this  order,  and  we  shall  be  glad  therefore  if  you  will  kindly  do 
your  very  best  to  urge  these  blanks  forward. 

Yours  faithfully, 

(Signed)  F.  W.  Pratt. 


General  Manager, 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Copy  Letter. 


BDISON-BBLL  CONSOLIDATED  PHONOGRAPH  CO:  LTD. 
39  Charing  Cross  Road.  w.  C. 

8th  March,  1899. 


Messrs  The  Edison  United  Phonograph  Co! 
Bdigon  House', 

Northumberland  Avenue.  W.C. 


Dear  Sirs, 

We  have  had  application  made  to  us  for  payment,  of 
Income  Tax  in  respect  of  property  and  House  Duty,  amounting  in 
all  to  £49.11,8.  Will  you  be  good  enough  to  send  us  a  cheque 
for  one-fourth  of  this  amount  to  enable  ua  to  settle  at  once. 

Yours  faith  £lilly, 

(Signed)  p.  y,  Pratt., 


General  Managi 


Mr.  S.  F.  Moriarty, 

Edison  House, 

Northumberland  Avenue, 

London,  W.  C.,  England. 

Dear  Sirs- 

Your  cablegram  of  the  7th  inst.  received,  by  which  1  understand 
that  lord  Ravelstrok  will  sail  tomorrow.  I  shall  consequently  expect 
him  at  the  end  of  next  week,  and  trust  that  your  assxirances  as  to  the 
certainty  of  his  promptly  closing  the  business  will  be  fully  realized. 


^irxaxrn  pjcmgje  138) 

^jariTjumfrjerlattjb-  Stfrerarje, 


Iff^rtjCrxrn, 


Dear  Mr  Moriarty, 

Your  telegram  did  not  arrive  here  last  night  until 
7.30  so  Attorbuiry  infoxms  me,  30  that  it  was  impossible  to  attend  to 
it  last  night.  1  asked  Mr  Pratt  this  morning  for  the  Articles  of 
Association,  and  am  sending  them  to  you  herewith  by  separate  registers! 
book  post,  and  hope  you  will  safely  receive  the  package. 

A  cable  oarae  in  this  morning  which  I  immediately  transmitted  to 
you  by  wire  using  the  code  words  used,  and  hope  it  has  been  properly 
telegraphed,  and  that  you  will  have  no  difficulty  in  decifiring  it. 

I  now  send  the  original  message,  and  as  I  was  careful  to  typewrite 
the  message  sent  to  you  this  morning  I  hope  it  has  gone  through  exactl; 
so  that  you  may  be  able  to  got  the.  proper  reading  of  the  message 
to-day. ,  as  evidently  Mr  Morison  desires  a  quick  answer,  and  it  was 
that  reason  that  prompted  me  to  send  you  the  message  by  wire  at  once. 

I  will*  look  back  again  later  on  in  the  day,  as  it  is  Saturday  afternoc 
in  case  you  wire  an  answer  which  I. will  immediately  code  and  re-direct 


Mr  Pratt  mentioned  to-day  th*.  Lord  Denbigh  request  ad  STto  make 
enquiry  if  it  was  possible  to  hold,  the  meeting  next  week  on  X«*  Tuesday 
instead  of  Wed:.  I  told  him  that  I. would  communicate  with  you.  Mr 
Pratt  said  that  Sir  Wm:  Jones  is  ill  and  confined  to  his  room,  Mr 
Smith  i.  .MU  ror„  ill  i„  Glasgow* and  oannot  o»s  and  Mr  wra,t  i, 

Z7.  T  7'h  A,,ri1,  ■"*  ■>«”■“*  — »  fend  .  meeting  on 

bnt  Mr  Mr.tt  »„  ...  that  there  will  | 

r  Annan  is  expeotod  baok  to-day,  but  it  is  not  known  what  his  movement! 


will  be  next  week.  I  communicate  to  yon  these  fact 3,  so  that  you  nw 
Jcnow  how  to  act.  Mr  Pratt  says  that  unless  Sir  Vta:  Jones  is  better  ai  < 
able  to  come  out  on  Tuesday  tWe  cannot  be  a  meeting,  as  he  is  sure 
Mr  Smith  will  not  come  down  next  week,  the  reports  being  very  bad 
concerning  him,  but  if  you  wish  me  to  communicate  further  with  you  on 
Monday  morning  early  let  me  know  and  I  will  do  so. 

The  weather  has  turned  again  for  the  worst  to-day  being  wet  and 
misty  again,  and  very  treacherous. 


Voars  very  truly. 


[ON  BACK  OF  PRECEDING  PAGE] 

/'C'ky  -  r  A'Yf,  7 - ^ 

S'**  -*l'r  A  ^a-  .* £ ,^y» 

. /L  t-v  <^~c£  ;  A^,^ifr 

y^{.(  A  Jfcz.  -<m  V^.  /^ri  -f  v-A  -~v 


T"~ 


?- 


£^,f 


\oaua  A&uJi  p  J.nrjA  *  j 

WjapA  GUJfTU*  SUtf  AOI.A  4>J.S3CJJGMMJ8« 

Xj/e  MGfffjisj.  p&a  ffi,.mq  aSsin  iol.  f}io  jiioi.ap  po-ga A  pGiufa.  nap  aug 
j-jougaA  iuomjiuB  saj-jA  jsp  uis  Tfuoiii  sug  x  tt. ijj  go  so*  \ 

cowcsi.WTUfc;  jitui*  pnp  tx,  Aon  Miap  cjg  410  couuHnjrca.p6  yrx.pjJGi.  MipjJ  Aon  ou  , 
j-jj.  gtij-pii  mijj  v op  cows  gojfu  uoxp  mosjc*  PJig  ualjoupa  psiuG  asj.A  pag 
spja  po  oowg  onp  ou  xneagaA  p-Joto  cauuo'p  Pg  a  ugg^tuS*  aa  jig  ia  anus 
jiuoav  jjo/a  po  aop«  ftx.  i,j.app  aa  Aa  ppap  mijsaa  garx.  tipi  'xougb  1a  psppsi.  ai  ( 
mtjj  P15  ugxp  Masjf  I  ccmiamjjc ape >0  Aon  pysae  yicpa*  ao  ppap  Aon  wtft 


S.  F.  Morlarty  Esq. , 


llth.  March  1899. 


Edison  House,  HORTHUMBEKTiAHD  AVEHUE.  H.C. 


Dear  Sir, 

1  am  instructed  by  the  Chairman  to  ask  if  you  will  be 
good  enough  to  favour  us  with  a  cheque  for  the  cabinet&which 
cheque  1  understand  was  to  be  repaid  to  this  Company  in  10  days 
from  the  last  Board  Meeting. 

I  am,  dear  Sir, 

Yours  faithfully, 

/iJene  ral  Manager. 


I mEZ\  i 

Telephone  N?p  Bank. 


Telegraphic  Adlress, 

“Coates:  London. 


(CORHER  OF  COLEMAN  ST.) 


^JrmOs/, 


smarms,  March-i4th . 


. 


S.P.Morlarty  Esq. 

Edison  House, 

Northumberland  Avenue. 

W.C. 

Dear  Sir, 

I  oomraunioated  with  the  Secretary. of  the  Edison  Bell 
Consolidated  Phonograph  Co.  yesterday  asking  whether  the  transfers 
from  you  to  myself  of  the  £3,000  Debentures  and  336  Ordinary 
shares  had  gone  through  but  he  replies  this  morning  that  he  has 
not  yet  reoeived  the  oertificates  from  you.  When  I  saw  you 
ten  days  or  a  fortnight  ago  you  promised  that  this  would  be 
carried  out  immediately.  X  now  give  you  notice  that  unless 
this  matter  is  put  through  by  12. o' clock  on  Friday  next  the 
17th  inst.  I  shall  place  the  matter  in  the  hands  of  my  Solicitor 
without  any  further  delay. 


V 


Telephone  N!2I8  Bank. 


Telegraphic  Aodress, 
“Coates';  London. 


•9.9,  .  A'.C. 

(CORNER  OP  COLEMAN  ST.) 

/c)  / 

'=sa~j0n€Um/t . _  March  14th  - . /(¥  M 


S.F.Moriarty  Esq. 

Edison  House, 

Northumberland  Avenue, 
W.C. 


Dear  Sir, 


-Edison  Bell  Consolidated  Phonograph  Co.- 
We  beg  to  inform  you  that  taless  we  receive  the  cheque 
from  you  due  to  us  in  the  above  matter  by  12. o' clock  on  Friday 
next  the  17th  inst  we  shall  place  the  matter  in  the  hands  of  our 
Solicitor  without  any  further  delay. 


New  York,  March  14th,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriartyt -PERSONAL. 

I  am  duly  in  receipt  of  your  letters  of  March  1st  and  4th 
contents  of  which  are  all  noted. 

I  do  not  know  who  the  Gould!  is  that  you  refer  to,  but 
I  ascertained!  that  a  man  named  Fred  A.  D'A  Goold,  sailed  on  the 
"Teutonic"  February  22nd. 

No  one  seems  to  know  who  this  man  ir,  and  if  I  find  out 
anything  about  him,  I  Irill  let  you  know  at  once*. 

iThere  is  a  man  by  the  name  of  Alfred  Clarke,  he  has  a 
middle  name,  but  X  cannot  find  out  what  it  is?  just  now,  who  used; 
to  be  with  Tewksbury  in  the  United  States  Phonograph  Company,  Newar/o 

C.E. 

but  who  is  now  employed  by^Stevens,  and  I  am  told  is  at  present  in 
London. 

He  is  reported!  to  have  taken  some  "GEM"  machines,  and  is 
soliciting  orders  for  them,  as  well  as  for  Edison's  larger  machine 
of  which  latter  type’,  namely  the  new  large  machine;,  Edison  is 
reported  to  have  shipped  about  two  weeks  ago  some  thirty  of  these 
to  London. 

X  have  not  had  this  verified,  but  I  have  no  dohbt  itnis  so. 

There  has  been  made  only  25  of  the  little  GEM  machines,  so 
Gilmore  states?,  and  I  hear  it  from  other  sources,  but  there  will  be 
a  lot  of  them  ready  very  shortly,  and  there  is  no  doubt  at  all,  but 
that  they  will  be  shipped  abroad  in  quantities?,  for  everybody  has? 


a 


-2- 


orders  for  them,  therefore  I  hope?  that  your  French  Company  and  the 
reorganisation  of  the  EdisonwBell  Board,  will  be  entirely  completed 
before  any  noise  ia  ntde  abroad  about  these  small  "GEM"  machines. 

I  enclose  you  a  cut  of  the  machine,  and  am  doing  my  level  best 
to  get  hold  of  one  of  them  to  ship  you  from  some  other  source  thanh 
theca  Phonograph  Works,  for  it  is  clearly  evident,  that  neither 
Edison  or  Gilmore  want  us  to  have  one,  as  they  distributed)  25  of 
them  as  samples  to  Stevens’, ^their  show-room  at  26th  St.  &  Broadway 
/<fthe  Consolidated!  Phonograph  Companies,  Ltd.  Newark,  had  one,  which 
they  shipped  to  Philadelphia,  but  it  will  be  returned  to  them, 

4'the  Edisoniani a  Co.,  Newark,  N.  J.  of  which  A.O. Pettit,  is  General 
Manager,  and  to  other  persona* 

We  were  not  even  notified  by  the  Works?,  much  less  were'  we> 
permitted  to  have  a  sample. 

The  Enclosedl  cut.  shows?  at  the  right-hand  side  a  push-button 
which  stops  and  atarts  the  machine,  as  you  push  it  in  or  pull  it 
out,  also  in  the  same  mechanism  is  a  speed  regulator,  the  push¬ 
button  goes  through  the  apedd- regulator,  and  the  speed-regulator 
turns  on  a  screw. 


You  see  other  people  get  these  things^  and  we  do  not. 

Yours  very  truly, 

y  l,  <7-t  C^i  er  /  C 

smailWGEMdrnspMn  &t  po?3ibl«  for  Y°«  to  take1  orders  for  this 

machine1  will  wear  however  vj  ’  *  *  1  do  not  know  how  wel1  the 

. h°WeV0r  at  the  difference  in  price 


T 


still  on  second  thoughts,  X  guess  it  is  better  not  to  try  to  take 
orders  unless  you  have  a  sample',  although  the  machine  is  going  to 
sell  here  like  hot  cakes,  and  my  hope  was  that  we  would  be  able  to 
show  big  orders  for  this  small  machine  before  they  got  very  ihr  in 
their  shipments. 

Now  let  me>  caution  you  that  knowing  the  feeling  of  Mr  SearleB 
in.regard  to  orders  and  business  from  past  experience,  you  should 
send  us  on  wxibc  the  order-  signed  by  the  parties  ordering  the  goods, 
or  if  a  cable  order-,  have  it  signed  by  the  Company  ordering  them, 
withe-,  a  knowledge  of  how  they  are  going  to  be  paid  for-. 

I  advise  this  3imply  to  make  sure  that  when  your  order  is 
received),  Mr  Searles  cannot  delay  filling  it,  on  account  of  not 
knowing  how  he  is  to  get  his  money, n  etc.  Why  not  have  two  origi¬ 
nals  executed  by  the  Company,  you  keep  one,  and  send  the  other  to 

there-,  with  a  check  Ibr  tZf  t  ft*1*™  in  Phon°sraphs 

Prescott  had  .hipped  to,  }500.  «orth  o?  M,  good"  '  "" 

the  ’I™*  «* 

that  the  maximum  disoount  is  35  per  cent  ^ut  ^  Whioh  you  win  see 

order  35  th./told  n0,  giS.  ^“hf^’ce"?  STSU,’” 

Sa4nS,r^yoft‘.ga1eS  T.IZV  oT to  ihe 
what  we  could  buj  them  at  in  large  quantitieJ.  °°Ur8e  d°  n0t  kn°W 

W*AM  PRETTY  SURE  MR  SEARLES  WILL  NOT  PAY  TOR  THOqw  nan i»w«. 
THEREFORE  I  HOPE  YOU  WILL  BE  ABLE  TO  SEND  ME  MORY  m  ™  t 


EDISON  PHONOGRAPH  WORKS. 


Orange,  N.  J.  March  16,  1899. 

Edison  United  Phonograph  Co., 

G.  N.  Mori  son,  Esq.,  Sec., 

27  William  St.,  new  York. 

Dear  Sir:- 

We  are  to-day  sending  you  by  express  one  "Gem"  phonograph 
The  machine  as  it  is  sent  you  is  the  same  as  our  regular  production 
will  be,  with  the  exception  that  we  purpose  adopting  metal  mandrels 
instead  of  tht.wooden  mandrel  such  as  is  now  on  the  machine.  We, 
however,  up  to  this  writing  have  not  been  able  to  secure  a  mandrel 
which  just  suits  us,  and  have inot  yet  finally  decided  just  what 
style  it  shall  be. 

Yours  very  truly, 

(Signed-.)  j.  r.  Schermerhorn, 


jrs/tww 


Asst.  General  Manager. 


S.  F.  Moriarty,  Esq., 
London,  England. 
Dear  Sir:- 


Referring  to  the  Memroandum  of  Agreement  made  the  7th 
day  of  February,  1899,  between  the  Edison  Bell  Cosiwlidated  Phono¬ 
graph  Company,  Ltd.,  the  Edison  United  Phonograph  Company,  and 
Stephen  Fv .  Moriarty  "Compromising  points  in  Difference’'. 

We  note  that  the  American  Company  shall  not  be  entitled 
to  call  upon  the  Consolidated  Company  to  accept  deliveries  of  the 
undelivered  residue  of  550  Phonographs,  except  for  the  purpose  of 
maintaining  the  stock  of  the  Consolidated  Company  at  the  limit  of 
450  machines,  but,  there  is  no  limit  of  time  in  which  they  c  an  put 
off  ordering  the  automatic  machines  shipped!,  and  it  would  be  in 
their  power  to  do  so  indefinitely,  we  therefore  call  your  special 
attention  to  ithis  point. 

We  beg  to  notify  you  that  the  Automatic  Phonographs  stord cf- 
in  Brooklyn,  for  account  of  the  Edison  Bell  Consolidated  Phono) 

Co:  Ltd’.,  have  not  been  insured  ,  and  we  would  thank  you  to  kindly 
formerly  notify  them  of  this  fact,  and  that  if  they  wish  them 
insured  they  must  remit  us  the  money  to  pay  the  premium. 

Fours  very  truly,  ^  ,  ,/ 

_ _  ■;  •  'T/7/1 


Mr.  S.  F.  Moriarty, 

Edison  House, 

Northumberland  Avenue , 

London,  W.  0.,  England. 

Dear  Sir:- 

I  was  as  much  chagrined  as  surprised  when  on  Monday  instead 
of  meeting  Lord  Ravelstrok  as  1  expected,  1  received  a. cable  from  you 
stating  that  he  would  not  be  here  for  another  fortnight.  The  In¬ 
ternational  Trust  Company  was  organised  a  week  ago  with  a  Board  of 
Directors  representing  the  strongest  financial  interests  in  the  City  of 
Baltimore.  In  addition  to  the  cotton  and  warehouse  business,  con¬ 
cerning  which  I  have  already  written  you,  we  have  secured  the  immense 
business  of  the  Seaboard  Air  Line  Railroad,  and  of  the  enterprises 
represented  by  Mr.  J.  Skelton  Williams,  President  of  the  Company,  and 
Middendorf,  Oliver  &  Company,  of  Baltimore,  besides  a  foreign  con¬ 
nection  which  promises  to  be  very  valuable.  The  announcement  of  these 
interests  in  combination  in  the  new  Trust  Company  resulted  in  a  great 
rush  for  subscriptions  in  Baltimore,  and  the  entire  capital  stock  of 
§2,000,000.  plus  §1,000,000.  surplus  was  subscribed  five  times  over 
within  twenty-four  hours,  the  result  being  a  tremendous  pres sub  upon 
me  from  my  Baltimore  associates  to  surrender  a  part  of  my  interest 
which  I  had  reserved  for  my  English  associates.  .  This  I  stubbornly 
refused  to  do,  expecting  the  matter  to  be  settled  on  Monday  on  the  ar¬ 
rival  of  Lord  R.  It  was  useless  in  view  of  the  delay  to  think  of 
holding  the  matter  open,  as  I  go  to  Baltimore  this  evening  tcjmeet  to¬ 
morrow  the  Committee  and  members  of  the  Board  with  a  view  to  com¬ 
pleting  the  organization.  I  am  surprised  beyond  measure  to  think 


8.  F.  M.,  No.  2,  3/21/99. 

you  should  have  waited  until  Lord  R.  should  have  arrived  here  before 
advising  me  that  he  had  not  sailed. 

I  have  been  holding  on  to  the  Cotton  Company  business  for 
his  arrival,  under  circumstances  which  have  been  extremely  disagreeable, 
but  with  the  assurance  that  the  matter  was  to  be  settled  this  week. 

It  is  useless,  however,  to  dally  with  them  any  longer,  and  I  shall 
immediately  organize  a  syndicate  to  place  the  stock  here. 

Yours  very 


P.  S.  Your  cable  received  stating  that  a  meeting  will  be  held 
tomorrow  with  Farquhar  and  Hardwicke,  when  they  are  to  give  their 
final  decision. 


* 


New  York,  March  27th,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriarty:-  PERSONAL. 

I  have  just  seen  Mr  Searles,  and  he  is  altogether  annoyed 
about  this  business,  and  he  says  he  was  never  so  much  inortified) 
about  anybusiness  in  his  life,  as  he  has  been  about  this,  and  that 
if  you  do  not  show  some  business  in  30  days,  he  is  going  to  tell 
Edison,  he  can  sell  machines  anywhere  he  darn  pleases. 

He  saw  Edison  at  Lakewood  last  week,  and  he  is  going  to  have 
him  down  there  again  this  week,  but  he  says  Edison  wants  his  money 
for  the  2,000  machines-,  which  he  has  had  stored  there  for  us  for  a 
long  time,  and  when  I  talkedi  to  him  about  Edison  having  ruined  a 

CO-C.ttCs 

number  of  contracts  for  us,  which  !  m  on  the  point:  of  completion 
A  ' 

and.  is  still  shipping  no  end  of  machines  abroad*,  he  says  that  he  da 

doe®  not  wonder-  Edison  does  ship  abroad),  that  we  do  no  business, 
and  we  have  got  nobody  over  there-  that  can  do  it;  that  everything 
is  going  to  be  accomplished)  next  week  or  next  Christmas,  or  some¬ 
thing  jro  that  effect  and  that  Annan  comes  on  here  and  tells  Edison 
that  he  controls  the  Board  of  the  Edison-gell. , 

When  Mr  Searles  remarked  that  he  would  tell  Edison  he 
could  ship  where  he  pleased’,  if  you  did  no  business  in  30  days,  I 
said  "0  no  you  would  not  Mr  Searle®,  and  when  you  see  Mr  Edison  you 
"should  meet  him  not  in  a  spirit  as  if  you  were  in  the  wrong,  but 
"on  the  contrary,  and  try  to  arrange  so  that  we  can  get  control  of 
"those  machine®,  and  there  will  be  no  doubt  about  our  sending 
orders  fot  them",  but  he  replied  that  that  is  absurd’,  there  is  a 


big  Company  formed  srer  there  which  cannot  even  take  the  2,000 
machine  s  they  have  ordered. 


You  can  see  from  this  how  dissatisfied  Mr  Searles  is,  and  how 
impossible'  it  would  be  for  him  to  accompli sh .anything  with  Mr 
Edison,  if  he  should  be  in  this  spirit  when  he  meets  him. 

I  tried  to  show  him  that  this  was  entirely  the  wrong  view' to 
take  of  U,  but  we  cannot  expect  to  accomplish  much  with  Edison 
nor  v;can  we  now  expect,  much  from  Mr  Searles,  unless  orders  are  re¬ 
ceived!,  and  he  can  feel  there  is  a  fair  prospect  for  future  busi¬ 
ness,  and  one  parting  shot  he  gave  to  me,  was  "there  is  the  German 
Company,  which  has  never  amounted  to  anything",  and  the  long  and 
short  of  it,  is,  that  if  we  want  Mr  Searles  do-operation  and  aid, 
we  have  .got  to  show  business-,  and  cannot  count  upon  it  until  we  do. 

In  order  to  accomplish  anything  with  Edison,  it  would  be 
necessary  for  Mr  Searles  to  guarantee  some  big  orders  or  give  his 
personal  assurance  of  early  future  business,  but  as  Mr  Searles  has 


not  the  confidence'  himself  he  should  hav®,  it  is  not  worth  while 
for  you  to  make  yourself  believe  you  have  his  entire  confidence, 
when  you  have  not,  therefore  it  does  not  look  to-day  as  if  Mr 
Searles  was  likely  to  accomplish  anything  with  Edison  even  if  he 
does  see  him  this  week,  unless  we  get  some  business-. 

The  orders  for  Cylinders  are  not  counted  as  anything,  and  Mr 

s*  °»  ‘h»"- unti1 

it  to-day.  ’  d  he  S9emi, altogether-  discouraged, t  abot 


April  4,  1899. 


Mr.  S.  F.  Moriarty, 

Edison  House, 

Northumberland  Avenue, 

London,  W.  C.,  England. 

Dear  Sir:- 

Your  letters  of  the  25th  tat:..  received.  I  am  glad  to  know 
that  you  have  hopes  of  being  able  to  rearrange  matters  with  the 
Edison-Bell  Company  before  long  and  put  them  upon  a  more  satisfactory 
basis.  It  is  needless  to  say  that  it  will  be  a  very  great  relief  to  me 
when  this  is  done.  As  to  support,  I  have  never  failed  to  give  you  that 
to  the  fullest  degree,  and  only  covet  an  opportunity  to  carry  out  some 
definite  business  proposition  which  you  will  be  able  to  submit,  not  only 
for  London,  but  for  Paris  and  the  Continent.  Mr.  Annan's  visit  here 
has  tended  to  demoralize  matters  somewhat,  and  I  shall  hope  soon  to 
here  that  you  have  interested  other  parties  to  take  his  place. 

I  see  by  the  newspapers  that  Lord  Ravelstrok  arrived  on 
Saturday,  and  I  have  Lord  Hardwicke's  letter  saying  that  he  has 
given  hin  an  introduction,  but  he  has  not  yet  presented  it.  I  shall 
doubtless  hear  from  him  soon. 

I  remain. 


My  Dear  Mr  Mori  arty, 


-2  P 

... 

/°/ 

5th  Apl  1899 


Gouraud  v  Edison  United 


Mr  Munro  has  Instructed  me  to  appear  to  the  Writ  which  has 
been  served-  upon  him  and  has  handed  to  me  a  memorandum  containing 
a  note  of  your  views  in  reference  to  the  jurisdiction  of  the  Court 
I  am  applying  to  set  the  Writ  and  the  service  aside  as  irregular. 
The  application  is  to  be  heard  on  the  13th  inst,  before  which  date 
it. will  be  necessary  for  me  to  prepare  an  affidavit  in  support  of 
the  appli c at  ion .  I  have  also  received  from  Mr  Munfco  this  evening 
a  further  Writ  which  has  been  served  by  Mr  Gouraud  by  which  he 
claims  a  sum  of  £886  alleged  to  b8  due  from  the  Edison  United  to 
Messrs  Bireham  &  Co  and  to  have  been  assigned  by  them  to  Mr  Gour¬ 
aud;  this  writ  was  served  last  Thursday.  I  shall  appear  tomorrow 
and  shall  take  the  same  course  in  this  action  as  I  have  taken  in 
that  to  which  reference  has  been  made  above.  It.  is  very  necessary 
that  these  proceedings  should  be  dealt  with  promptly  vigourously 
and  completely  and  I  shall  be  glad  6f  the  earliest  opportunity 
of  conferring  with  you  upon  the  subject.  It  is  obvious  that  Mr 
Gouraud  is  prompted  by  some  feeling  of  enmity  against  your  Com-  - 
pany  and  it  is  singular  that  he  should  have  selected  this  time 
for  his  attack;  the  question  is,,  what  has  occurred  to  set  him  in 
motion. 

Please  pardon  me  for  dictating  this  letter,  but  unless  I 
do  so  it  will  not  catch  tonight's  Mail.  I  only  received  the  Writ 


in  the  Second  action  at  a  late  hour  this  evening. 

Yours  faithfully, 

GEORGE  RIDDELL, 
pp  R.G.S. 


Stephen  F.  Moriarty  Esq., 
Ritz  Hotel,  Paris. 


(Slbison  ’fficrnsii  (IS) 
^0rlljum&jerlartir  SMjunxxe, 
y&axitSQTi, 
ffll.  ®. 


6th  April  1899. 

Dear  Mr  Moriarty, 

I  had  a  latter  from  Mr  Riddell  this  morning  x  a 
oopy  of  which  X  ancles e  yoa.  It  speaks  for  itself,  and  I  have  only  to 
say  that  I  telephoned  him  to-day  and  Mr  Riddell  has  aBked  me  to  go  to 
his  offioe  to-morrow  afternoon  for  the  purpose  of  swearing  an  affidavit 
which  I  will  do,  and  will  advise  you. 

There  is  nothing  elBe  of  importance  to  refer  to  to-day,  and  I 
have  simply  to  eiolose  the  letters  that  arrived  for  you. 

Yours  very  truly. 


P.S. 

There  are  letters  in  this  morning  from  both  Clarke  of  Madrid  and 
Palm  of  Vienna  asking  for  cheques  to  be  sent  them  immediately.  Palms 
a/c  is  £51  and  as  he  it  is  most  out  of  pocket  expenses  he  must  have; 
a  remittance  soon. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Copy  Letter. 

9  John  Street, 

Bedford  Row.  W.C. 
5th  April,  1899. 


Dear  Sir, 


QOURAUD  v  BDISON  UNITED. 

ACTION  Wo:  1. 

We  enclose  copy  surmiona  which  we  have  issued.  You  will 
observe  that,  it  is  to  be  heard  on  the  13th  inst:  before  whioh  date 
it  will  be  necessary  for  us  to  prepare  an  affidavit  in  support,  of 
the  application.  We  shall  require  to  see  you  or  sane  other 
officer  for  the  purpose  of  obtaining  the  information  necessary  to 
enable  iis  to  prepare  the  affidavit.  Will  you  kindly  let  us  know 
when  it  will  be  convenient  for  you  to  call.  We  shall  also  be 
glad  to  know  when  Mr  Moriarty  is  expected  to  return  as  it  is  very 
necessary  that  these  actions  should  be  dealt  with  promptly  and 
completely. 


ACTION  No:  a. 

We  are  duly  in  receipt  of  your  favour  of  yesterday's 
date  with  the  enclosed  copy  Writ.  We  shall  take  the  same  course 
in  this  action  as  we  have  pursued  in  reference  to  the  other  case. 
Appearance  must  be  entered  in  this  action  to-morrow. 

Yours  faithfltlly, 

(Signed)  Riddell,  &  Co: 

Boo!  Munro,  Bsq, 

Bdi  son  House, 

Northumberland  Avenue. 


Mew  York,  April  8th,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriarty:-  PERSONAL. 

It  has  been  suggested  to  me  that  the  reason  the  small  "GEM" 
machine-  and  the  "Cbncert  Grand"  are  not  yet  out  in  any  quantity,  is 
due  the  feet  that  there  may  be  contention  between  the  Phonograph 
and  Graphophone* in  regard  to  it  due  to  the  feet  that  there  may  have 
been  an  understanding-  between  them  that  Edison  would  not  put  out  a 
small  machine*  to  compete  with  the  Graphophone  Company's  small 
machine?  but  this  is  only  the  hearsay  which  has  come  to  me,  and 
purely  conjecture,  for  my  part  I  do  not  believe  there  is  anything 
in  the  report.*  but  Edison  is  holding  back  quotations  to  dealers-, 
and  they  cannot  understand  it,  and  Mr  Searles  may  have  possibly 
had  something  to  do  with  this,  without  letting  me  know,  as  he  has* 
had  one  interview  with  Mr  Edison,  but  he  does  not  talk  as  if  he  had 


done  anything,  although  I  have  been  urging  him  constantly. 

FROM  MY  RECENT  LETTERS,  YOU  MUST  BE  FULLY  AWARE:  OF  THE  FEELING 
MR  SEARLES' ENTERTAINS  TOWARDS  THIS  BUSINESS,  AND  I  HAVE  NOT  FOUND 
AN  OPPORTUNITY  FOR  BRINGING  BEFORE  HIM  THE  LITTLE  MATTER  OF  THE 
CABINETSVBECAUSE  WE  WANTED  TO  ACCOMPLISH  OTHER  THINGS,  AND  A  VERY 
DISCOURAGING  MATTER  LIKE  THIS  WOULD  NOTNHAVE  HELPED  THE  SITUATION, 
THIS  IS  WHY  I  HAVE  WRITTEN  YOU  TWO  OR  THREE  LETTERS' ASKING1  YOU  TO 
TRY  TO  COLLECT  FROM  THE  EDISON  BELL  ENOUGH  MONEY  TO  SEND  ME  TO  PAY 
THIS  BILL  TO  THE  HERRMANN  COMPANY,  SAY  $600.  AND  I  HAVE  JUST 
RECEIVED  ANOTHER  STATEMENT  FROM  THEM,  WHICH  WORRIES  ME’.  .  IF  YOU  CAN 


SUCCEED  IN  THIS,  CABLE  l 


.  1  ME  ™E  MONEY  ON  RECEIPT  OF  THIS  LETTER, 


-2- 

I  KNOW  THAT  MR.  SEARLES  WILL  NOT  PAY  SUCH  A  BILL. 

I  am  endeavoring  to  dispose'  of  the  12  Cabinets  her®,  but  have 
not  succeeded  yet,  and  this  little  matter  causes  me  a  great  deal 
of  annoyance. 

I  do  not  like  to  bother  you  about  this  Cabinet  business,  but 
what  am  I  to  do,  for  I  can  hardly  get  money  for  actual  shipments, 
much  less'  to  pay  for  Cabinets  which  have  been  thrown  on  our  hands. 

Yours  very  truly. 


fireu'dait:  JTtCmMjtf  &/tAon;  S.  7£7?lwtd0/l/,  Sccntmry. 

<§te/l/wn'Jl  77/orcartl/,  tm>  Beeu&td  Minor;/  Stored*#  Z0td/*m/vM3"U6tt  'Vfr 


Dear  Siri¬ 
us  had  a  talk  with  Mr  M.  V.  Grass’  yesterday  in  regard  to 
some  new  Styles  of  Phonographs^  which  he  is  getting  out,  and  the 
special  models  to  which  I  wish  to  call  your  attention,  will  probabj- 
be  called!  the  "Multiplex  Kommercial",  one  style  ofv.which,  is  run  by 
a  spring-motor,  the  other  style  to  be  run  by  electricity,  fitted 
with  a  very  nice  little  resistance  coil,  and  I  want  to  send  you  a 
model  just  as  soon  as  I  can. 

The  list  prices  of  the  Spring-motor  style  will  probably  be 
about  $65.00,  and  the  price  to  dealers,  about  $42.50  nett.. 

The  cost  of  this  machine  to  us,  in  lots  of  about  200,  will  be 
in  the  neighborhood  of  $22.00,  a  little  more  or  less* 

The  electrical  styles  will  list  not  less  than  $100.,  and 
probably  more. 

The  cost  of  this  electric  machine  to  us  will  be  from  32  to  35 
Dollars  or  thereabout®,  in  quantity. 

These  figures  are  all  estimated^  therefore?  do  not  take  them  as 
a  quotation,  for  they  may  be  changed!.  We  simply  asked  for  them 


ffi/t/ns$.<$‘ew/ej,  7&c.u,Antt  Jfomaidt  fiefam  &  TiT/kredotv,  <§*en&t,ry. 

Sb/i/ww  37?lena-rty,  %Zc  Wnsu'eknt.  J&fafrry  &**&>>■  Jrr,tM„:>r 


in  order  to  enable  you  to  form  some  sort  of  calculation  in  regard 
to  them. 


I  have  always  felt,  that  this  Multiplex  Machine  would  be 
of  great  servioe  to  us  some  day,  and  I  do  not  believe  that  anybody 
who  sees  a  "Commercial  Multiplex^"  side  by  side  with  an  Edison  Sprinj 
m° tom,  will  hesitate  a  moment  in  choosing  the  S>  cylinder  machine, 
if  it  sounds  as  well,  and  X  believe  it  will,  although  I  have  not 
yet  heard  one,  but  there  seems  to  me  no  reason  why  it  should  not. 

If  I  had  the  money,  I  would  order-  one  of  each  style  bui^t.  at 
once.  A  model  of  the  electric  machine  would  cost  us  about  $75.00 
and  the  Clock-motor  model  about  $25.00 

Mr  Searles  however  is  not  now  in  the  frame  of  mind’,  over  this 
business;  to  encourage  men  to  ask  for  the  money  to  buy  them,  but  I 
will  try  to  get  one  as  soon  as  possible. 

Yours  very  truly, 

A/Hz  Z  l- o*l  L  j  -Crt  l/ 

Secretary. 

P.S.  Another**  important  thing  about  Multiplex  machines  1b,  that 
Mr  Ores S3  will  carry  out  any  reasonable  request  of  ours  in  regard  to 
protecting  our  territory,  where  we  have  the  Patents.  I  hope  you 
will  be  able  to  give  us  an  order  for  these  new  Commercials,  which 
_ Can  US9  agalnsi  ^di son  .machine  if  necessary* 


S.  F.  Moriarty,  Eaq., 
London,  England. 
Dear  Sir:- 


uaf/Uor/tfh 


:Apjzil_lA±h,^m9A.^X _ 


Mr  Searles  informed  me  this  morning  that  he  had  received 
a  quotation  from  Edison,  as  follows:- 

Concert  Grand  Phonograph  in  lots  of  50  §50.00  each. 

"GEM"  Phonograph  in  lots  of  2,500  3.85  each 

in  lots  off  5,000  3.75;  « 

Mr  Searles  stated  that  Edison  has  written  him  asking 
when  he  will  take-  the  Standard  Machines  still  undelivered,  and  call 
ing  his  attention  to  the  fact  that  he  said  he  would  take  them  long 


Mr  Searles  has  written  you  by  this  mail,  but  I  have  not 
seen  the  letter,  and  Mr  Searles  has  kept  the  letter  he  received 

from  Mr  Edison,  therefore  I  do  not  know  the  full  contents  of  that . 
-Urit-ash  SULfUUs  Ajcs  si ' 

I  told  Mr  Searles  that  we  should  have  better  prices  than 

those  quoted,  but  nothing  more  will  be  done  in  the  matter,  until  we 
get  a  bona  fide  order. 

Mr  Searles  is  so  discouraged  about  the  business  all  the  time, 
oars*  the  delays  in  getting  the  French  contract  through,  and  other 


/.oi.  Mkm£mA  Amwlf  Sdtom  S.  7&77lmik>n4  $e«nsfart/. 

r/l/l /;//.'  77777/0/1#/////,  Kn  Mauimf/  •S/t/mtory  SHnefor.'  7$tit/nv/t/, 77/: 7777///a  .Trr/u 


things,  that  it  requires  a  great  effort  on  my  partAto  keep  up  my 
own  courage. 


Yours  very  truly, 

71  o-i  wru/ 

Secretary. 

?!S*  Ii3e“t  y°u  80me  time  ago  a  yellow  card' giving  the  discount a 
MacMnptrfne^«e5e!  0n  ’’G1EM"  phonographs,  ranging  from  25  %  on  5 
notS™  +n  *  °n  raachine8>  not  cumulative?,  and  I  have  heard] 
nothing  to  disprove  these  quotations* 


New  York,  April  19th,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriarty:-  PERSONAL. 

Prescott  said  to  me  yesterday  that  you  had  a  new  machine?,  and 
that  if  the  Supply  Company  was  formed’,  you  would  give  them  this 
machine;. 

X  note  in  one  of  your  letters,  that  you  say  that  the  new 
Edison  Bell  Company  and  the  French  Company,  and  all  others,  Ij 
suppose  will  be  obliged  to  buy  from  us,  all  Phonographs  and  Supplier 
they  require*,  this  is  a  very  important  matter,  and  cannot  be 
exaggerated,  and  I  would  like  to  call  your  attention  to  the 
importance  of  making  it  very  clear  in  regard  to  Records  and  Blanks, 

Mr  Gresd'  called  in  yesterday,  and  I  tell  you,  they  are  likely 
to  be  a  factor  on  this  business  in  a  very  very  short  time,  they  are 
getting  out  some  nice  little  commercial  machines,  of  which  I  have 
written  you,  and  I  will  send  you  a  sample  as  soon  as  I  can  get  one, 
probably  next  week. 

I  sent  you  a  model  of  a  weight-motor  Phonograph  in  a  geeat  big 
tall  case;,  this  machine  has  been  immensely  improved.  End  I  intend 
to  ship  you  another  one,  with  all  the  latest  improvements  and  it 
works  well,  but  in  order  to  avoid  paying  for  it,  you  must  return 
to  us  the  one  you  have-,  and  you  had  better  do  thi s  right  away, 
because  the  one  you  have  is  so  imperfect  that  it  will  be  no  use  to 
you  whatever. 

Kindly  note;  that  this  weight-motor  machine  is  thought  so  much 
of  here;  by  one  man  who  knows  all  about  Phonographs,  that  he  is 
striving  to  make  a  contract  with  Cress'  for  a  hundred  or  two  of 


-2- 

theae  machines  for  this  Country,  and  has  offered'  to  give  Mr  Gress 
$100.  per  week  for  100  machines  clear  and  clean  of  every  sort  of 
expense  for  one  or  two  years,  but  Mr  Gress  thinks  he  can  make  more 
and  he  may  not  accept  the  offer,  although  it  would  not  restrict 
except  in  a  limited  territory. 


ytvjCa  f-  Tr* 

Please  keep  this^  perfectly  secret.,  because  if  it  got  out,  it 
would  hurt  us  in  our  relations  with  Mr  Gress,  and  probably  destroy 
hiis  confidence  in  us,  and  that  is^that  before  very  long-  theire  will 
probably  be  formed  here-  a  large  Company  for  the  Multiplex  including 
the  commercial  machines  and  all  his  stylfe®,  and  1  am  watching  it 

to  see-  that  we  are  protected  in  every  sense  of  the  word.  M~ 

Lr.Jy  n.drtrCfo.  4/*<.  A it/. 

V  I  have  been  watching  his  little  business,  and  it  has  been 
growing  constantly,  and  he  has  two  experts  experimenting  for  him 
all  the  time,  and  has  spent  a  good  deal  of  money,  so  that  as  we  own 
the  foreign  Patents  (conditionally)  1  look  to  some  considerable 
advantage  to  us  in  this  style  of  machine  and  our  pleasant  relations 
with  him,  which  I  want  to  keep  up,  because  he  tells  me  much  which 
he  would  not  tell  to  others,  and  we  can  get  many  an  advantage  with 
a  little  reciprocity  on  our  side'. 

Another  point  i*  regard  to  Gress  is,  that  I  have  twice  spoken 
tp  him  with  a  viem  to  getting  your  Brother  something  to  do,  I 
urged  it  strongly,  and  he  does  not  want  it  even  known  that  I  made 
any  suggestion  of  the  kind  to  him,  but  he  will  not  ibrget  it,  and 
if  an  opportunity/ presents  himself  where  he  can  us®  him,  I  think  I 


-3- 

stand  as  good  a  chance  as  any  ones  of  getting  it,  but  you  must 
realise  that  it  has  been  so  far  only  a  feeler,  and  nothing  may  corns 
of  it,  but  I  am  trying-. 

Yourws  very  truly, 

-f //  /v  W,,-.,' 


P.s.  I  enclose  you  a  clipping  from  to-day's  Sux*  of  an  advertisement 
of  the  Gram-o-phones,  read  it  carefully, and  note  what  they  say  about 
their  cylinders. 


RIDDELL, VAIZEY  &  SMITH.  fj, 

^Zp/u/w,,  me 

Z-ea^r  Ae~ 

Jk^  <&~v 

c^O  *f/-*Ce,  .  /^u-  /^**-*^  *'"'L* 

a~~^ —r,  ^  " 

y>^ ,  ^.^-4;  — -•*  ^ 

tr?*^ 

r*^,J  ■' 

•  4.  ***-  ^  //^r 

^  4-**sf*r 

^  ^  4^d"  ^  " 
^  /./*—  ^  ^  ~ 


~sZrt>, 

A  c. 


dcr/tfJwsst.', tKc’ZGth  Apl  1899 


Dear  Mr  Moriarty, 


Gouraud  v  The  Company 


I  regret  to  say  that  the  Judge  yesterday  dismissed  the  appeal 
but  gave  the  defendants  leave  to  appeal  to  the  Court  of  Appeal  pro¬ 
vided  that  the  Appeal  is  entered _wl thin  a  week  from  yesterday^.  He . 
also  staid  all  further  proceedings  pending  the  hearing  of  the  Appeal 
should  the  defendants  determine  to  avail  themselves  of  the  privilege. 
1  shall  be  glad  to  receive  your  Instructions  upon  the  subject  in  the 
course  of  tomorrow.  I  think  that  the  Judge  is  wrong,  but  it  Is  for 
you  to  say  whether  you  will  fight  the  action  out  here  or  make  a  fur¬ 
ther  endeavour  to  relegate  the  plaintiff  to  th^taerican  Courts. 

Yours  veryyraith£t 


Stephen  F.  Moriarty  Esq., 

Edison  House,  Northumberland  Avenue. 


My  lord  ai  d  Gentlemen, 

Referring  to  the  approximate  Balance  Sheet,  I  desire 
to  draw  attention  to  the  fact  that  in  taking  Stock,  X  have  had 
to  resort  to  a  method  which  I  thought  might  be  sufficient  for 
present  purposes,  but  ito  ich  of  course  would  not  be  followed  in 
a  Balance  she*t  for  publication. 

I  have  taken  the  total  number  of  Machines  sold, 
added  the  stodc  on  hand  here,  and  deducted  these  from  the  total 
purchased,  aid  have  taken  the  difference  as  being  at  the  wharf. 

According  to  the  books,  this  Company  purchased  791  "0" 
Machines  and  185  "D"  or  "H"  Machines;  total  976.  I  can  only 
account  far  929,  being  a  deficiency  of  47.  These  Machines 
cost  £17.  each.  Total  deficiency  £799. 

The  Company  also  purchased  100  old  Slot  Machines  at 
£17.  each.  X  can  only  account  for  89,  being  a  deficiency  of 
11,  which  at  £17.  each  amounts  to  £187. 

There  is  also  an  amount  of  £1,200.  paid  by  the  Company 
for  "Stock  of  Materials  at  Head  Office".  I  have  been  informed 
that  "Materials"  were  taken  at  valuation.  This  amount  was 
made  up  as  follows  .  "Cells  £428,  Cylinders  £136,  Records 
£506,  Accessories  £130. 

In  connection  with  the  Branches  I  find  that  this  Com¬ 
pany  paid  £713.  for  Stock  of  Materials.  I  have  no  record  how 
this  amount  was  arrived  at. 


Leeds,  Cardiff  and  Newcastle  Branches  have  been 
closed.  £133.18.0.  was  paid  for  "Materials"  at  Leeds  and  Car¬ 
diff  Branches  (being  part  of  the  above  £713),  but  when  the 
stock,  other  than  Machines,  was  returned  here,  it  was  only  con¬ 
sidered  worth  a  nominal  figure. 

I  have  had  considerable  difficulty  in  deciding  how 
these  items  should  be  treated  in  the  approximate  Profit  and 
Loss  Account  and  Balance  Sheet,  and  after  consultation  with  Mr. 
Annan  I  adopted  the  following  course.  The  total  purchase  price 
was  £160,000,  and  this  has  been  apportioned  on  estimated  values, 
.the  balance  being  treatted  as  the  cost  of  Patents,  Goodwill,  &c.; 
In  my  opinion  the  £1,913.  apportioned  to  "Stock  of  Materials" 
was  very-much  over  estimated,  therefore  I  have  written  back 
£1,379,  which  increases  the  balance  on  Patents,  Goodwill,  &c., 
Account  by  that  amount,  and  leaves  Stodc  of  Materials  as  cost¬ 
ing  £534.  I  have  also  carried  the  estimated  deficiency  in  the 
Electrical  Machines  to  the  debit  of  the  Patents,  Goodwill,  &c.. 
Account,  because,  subject  to  my  figures  being  correct,  there 
must  have  been  an  error  in  the  original  number  taken  over. 

I  have  also  carried  the  expenses  of  the  Newspaper 
Scheme  to  the  debit  of  an  Establishment  Expense  Account,  and 
have  not,  at  the  present,  debited  same  to  Profit  and  LossAc- 
count. 

Referring  to  the  amount  £41,198.7.6.  for  Purchases,  I 


will  mention  that  this  figure  includes  wages  and  expenses  di¬ 
rectly  expended  for. putting  goods  in  saleable  condition. 

Under  this  arrangement  the  gross  profit  works  out  ait 
about  40$  on  the  return. 

135  old  Electrical  Machines  have  been  sold.  The 
proceeds  of  the  sale  of  these  Machines  is  held  in  reserve  for 
redemption  of  Debenture:  Stock. 

There  is  a  difference  in  the  books  of  £56.7.10., 
which  has  been  for  the  moment  debited  to  Profit  and  Loss  Ac¬ 
count. 

An  amount,  £199.14.6.,  due  from  Mr.  Hough  for  Licenses 
is  still  outstanding,  and  is  held  up  as  an  Asset.  This  was  one 

of  the  assets  taken  over  from  the  old  Corporation.  Mr.  Hough 
tells  me  it  was  settled  when  the  Shares  in  Edisonia  were  pur¬ 
chased,  but  I  cannot  find  that  this  was  so.  There  is  a  debit 
balance  of  £750.  for  a  Bill  met  by  this  Company  on  behalf  of 
Edisonia,  which  presumably  will  be  written  off  against  the 
£1,500  Debenture  Stock  since  received. 

In  submitting  my  conclusions  I  would  point  out  that 
there  were  several  abnormal  circumstances  during  the  period 
under  review. 

The  Company  went  to  allotment  on  March  8th.,  from 
which  date  Debenture  Interest  was  paid,  but  the  purchase  was 
not  completed  until  April  7th.,  and  no  business  appears  to  have 


been  done  until  far  in  May.  Say  no  trading  for  two  months 
with  interest  running. 

From  April  7th.  to  August  31st.  not  one- third  of  the 
total  business  to  31st.  Deo  ember  was  done.  As  a  contrast,  in 
the  one  month  of  December  about  one-fifth  of  the  gross  business 
was  done. 

Organization  is  responsible  for  heavy  expenditure  in 
Law  Costs,  Travelling  and  General  charges,  and  is  not  likely  to 
be  recurrent.  There  has  also  been  a  considerable  charge  for 
storing  and  insuring  Stock. 

The  Rent  Rates,  &c.  ,  of  Edison  House,  for  3  months 
unused,  aanunt  to  about  £200. 

I  estimate  the  annual  charges,  including  Debenture 
Interest,  but  not  taking  into  consideration  depreciation  of 
Patents,  &c.,  at  about  £19,000,  which,  taking  the  gross  profit 
on  a  basis  of  40$,  requires  a  turnover  of  £47,500.  per  annum. 

Nothing  has  been  written  off  for  depreciation  of 
Patents,  & c., 

A.  SIMPSON  SLATER. 

Secretary. 


26th.  April  1899, 


New  York,  May  4th,  1899. 


My  dear  Mr  Mori  arty: -PERSONAL. 

When  your  cable  crf^May  3rd!,  was  received  yesterday,  I 
showed  it  ~/o  Mr  Se arias?,  and  he  remarked  that  you  had  said  the  same 
thing  last  week,  but  I  replied  that  you  stated  that  the  money  had’ 
not  been  arranged  satisfactorily,  but  he  said  it  had  not  been 
arranged  yet  according  to  this,  and  he  is  in  a  frame  of  mindi  to 
place  no  reliance  upon  anything  until  it  is  finally  and  positively 
accomplished!. 

Within  the  past  week  I  have  received!  two  communication® 
from  the  Herrmann  Furniture  &  Plumbers  Cabinet  Company,  requesting 
payment,  and  X  was  obliged  to  reply  that  I  would  give  the  matter 
attention  Monday  or  Tuesday,  but  I  did  not  speak  to  Mr  Searles 
afaout  it  until  yesterday  when  I  took  down  the  cable,  notwithstand¬ 
ing  the  fact  that  the  goods  were  shipped  in  January  and  February, 
and  I  am  surprised  that  they  have  allowed  the  account  to  stand  so 
long,  I  have  however  been  in  hope-s  that  we  would  get  some  remitt¬ 
ance  from  the  Edison  Bell  for  the  Automatics  or  for  the  seven  or 
eight  hundred  dollars  on  the  packing,  storage,  etc-,  which  they  owe 
on  them,  to  enable  us  to  pay  this  unfortunate  bill',  without  asking 
Mr  Searles,  as  X  was  perfectly  sure^that  it  only  needed  some  such 
pretext  as  this?  to  act  as  the"last  straw?  therefore  I  was  not  sur¬ 
prised  at  his  becoming  very  much  incensed!  at  my  asking  for  the 


money  fbr  such  anaecoumtt,  but  in  addition  to 


this  w«r  owe1  the  Phono¬ 


graph  Works?  $3,955.18’, 


and  they  demanded  money  this  week  also, 


-2- 

consequently  Mr  Searles  said  he  would  not  pay  another-  dollar,  and 
when  I  tried  to  make  him  8ay  positively  whether  I  should  order 
the  Concert  Grand  Cylinders  and  Records  ordered  in  your  cablff,  he 
refused  to  give  me  permission  to  do  so,  and  said  he  would  not  ship 
any  goods?  without  the  money,  and  askedl  me  where  we  v/ere  to  get  the 
money  flcr  them. 

Finally  I  said, as  he  rose  from  his  chair-  "What  am?;  I-ou  going 
to  do  about  these  accounts",  he  said  *  He  did  not  know'1  that  he 
could  not  do  anything,  and  he  also  remarked  that  he  had  better  uses 
for  his  money,  and  he  walkedl  out  of  the  room  to  call  in  another  man 
leaving  me  sitting  there. 

He  looked?,  so  put  out  that  I  am  sure  the  other  people  must  have 
noticed!  it. 

I  knew  this  Cabinet  business  would  be  the  one  thing  to  upset 
him,  and  I  have  endeavored  to  put  it  off  as  you  know. 

He  even  said  to  me  when  I  drew  my  check  on  the  1st  of  the 
month,  that  he  was  tired  of  paying  those  things,  and  made  me  feel 
very  uncomfortable?,  and  I  have  had  an  incessant  head-ache  for  two 
weeks  worrying  over  the  finances  of  the  Company. 

After  leaving  Mr  Searles  yesterday,  X  thought  it  was  best  to 
send  you;  a  cable?,  as  thefl«,will  be  a  row  with  that  Furniture?  Company 
iff' I  do  not  get;  $618.  to  pay  them. 

Yours  very  truly, 

is 


«r 


New  York,  May  J 

My  dear  Mr  Moriarty:-  PERSONAL. 

I  am  just  in  receipt  of  your  cable?  of  May  4th,  stating 
that  you  believe  you  will  be  able  to  send  me  the  Cabinet  money  next 
week,  for  which  I  thank  you,  but  it  was  simply  impossible  to  get  it 

from  Mr  Searles-,  although  I  do  not  know  what  he  might^^done'.  if 

A 

the  Cabinet  people;  had  entered  suit  against  us,  but  we  do  not  want 
any  such  thing  as  that,  for  it  would  be  heralded  all  over  the 
country. 

A  workman  told  me  the  other  day,  that  he  heard  this 
Company  was  bankrupt,  and  of  course  I  made  a  suitable  reply,  but 
it  might  have  come  from  Edison  or  the  Works,  and  in  thinking  over 
the  matter,  there  was  a  report  of  the  kind  out  when  Annan  was  here, 
and  it  has  occurred  to  me  that  our  Drafts  on  the  Edison  Bell  pro¬ 
tested  occasionally,  and  which  require'  Mr  Searles  endorsement  beolW 
they  can  be  negotiated}  here',  does  not  give  the  Ctompany  any  too  good 
standing-. 

I  hope  your  letter  which  you  rfer  to  in  the  previous 
cable;,  will  authorise;  payments  for  the  700  Type  No.  2,  and  the 
50,000  Cylinders  in  a  satisfactory  manner  to  Mr  Searles,  for  he 
will  certainly  not  ship  the  goods,  ff  payments  are  not  satisfactory# 

S  o'clock,  P.M.  I  have  just  seen  Mr  Searles,  but  no  chance  of 
getting  any  money  this  week-  to<Pay  the  Works,  so  I  thought.  I  would 
not  urge  the  matter  too  mucl^day,  and  run  the  chane*  of  fixing 
it  up  with  Gilmore  to-morrow* 

' . t- 


-2- 

Gresa  has  some  new  machines,  and  I  wanted  to  interest  Mr 
Searlem  fn  something-  to  cheer  him  up,  so  I  have  had  Gress?  fix  up 
his  place?,  and  I  asked  Mr  Searles  just  now- whether  he  would  go  up 
"<fewn  with  me  next  week  and  see  these  machines,  he  replied"  there 
is  not  much  use,  for  there  does  not  seem  to  be  any  place  to  use 
them",  I  judge  he  meant  by  this  that  we  were  not  selling  any  goods^ 
but  I  replied  "that  Oh  yes,  there  was-",  and  asked  him  to  fix  a  day 
which  would  be  most  convenient,  he  was  however  so  full  of  business 
that  he  could  not  put  his  mind  on  it,  however  he  promised  to  go 
some  day  during  the  week,  and  I  will  try  to  wake?  up  his  interest 
in  the  business-,  and  this  will  give  me  an  opportunity"  to  have  a 
talk  with  him. . 

This  wekk’s  experience  has  not  been  pleasant,  but  the 
good  day  is  bound  to  come-,  so  I  shall  look  on  the  bright  side  of ' 
thingss. 

I  hope  the  re-organization  will  soon  be  completed’,  and 
that  we  shall  have  some  good  nows  from  the  Automatic  business-. 

Yours  very  truly-, 

*0rl/yiri.o-UA.tn*/ 


London,  England’. 


Dear  Sir-J- 


We  are  duly  in  receipt  of  the  first  draft  of  the  French 
contract,  and  we  expect  V*.  the  correct  form  will  come  to  hand  this 
week,  therefore  will  reserve  any  remarks  on  this  subject  until  that 
comes  to  handi. 

idi^eur- 

We  do  not  exactly  what  is  meant  by  the  words  in  Article  2' 


"at  the  lowest  prices  for  v/hich  they  can  be  sold,  as  this  isnot 
very  definite,  also  I  hope  that  the  other  contract  will  state 
clearly  that  all  purchases  by  them  shall  be  made  through  this  Com¬ 
pany. 


I  believe  the  Phonograph  Works  are  now  putting  outtheir  small 
machines  here. 

I  note  that  you  say  that  Pathe'will  be  completely  wiped 
out  by  the  French  Company,  but  a  Company'that  can  order  $20,000. 
worth  of  goods  at  one  time,  and  are  doing  a  considerable5  business 
will  doubtless  make  something  of  a  fight  for  the  trade.  I  note 
also  that  you  say  that  you^control  of  the  Gramophone 

Yous  state  also  that  the  Schedule  of  prices-  will  be  exact 


ly  for  the  French  Company  as  the  Schedule  for  the  English  Company 
but  I  presume  you  have  noted  the  fact.,  that  some  of  those  prices; 
were  changedl,  namely^ype-  4  to  $65.00'  in  lots  less  than  1,000', 

$80.  for  Type'S,  (Multiple*),  and  to  $70.  for  Type  6,  for  less 
than  1,000. 

I  am  sending  you  by  this  mail  a  copy  of  the  Phonogcope; 
for  February,  please  read!  the  only  two  articles  I  have  marked. 

This  is  a  good  move  in  some  respects  on  the> part  of  Edison,  if 
it  is  k  faithfully  carried  out,  but  you  know  they  have  their 
favorites,  and  Gilmore  makes  special  concessions-. 

Yours  very  truly, 

•  Secretary. 

P.S.  X  was  told  that  a  salesman  was  going  to  Paris? in  the  interest 
of  the  National  Phonograph  Company,  and  that  Arnheim  ,  who  is  a 
tailor  on  Broadway,  was  supplying  the  money,  giving  it  the  appear¬ 
ance-  that  the  National  had  nothing  to  do  with  ilt,  but  I  do  not 
know  how  time  this  is?. 


New  York,  May  8th,  1899. 


My  dear  Mr  Mori arty:-  PERSONAL. 

Mr  Platt  called  to-day,  and  went  down  to  se®  Mr  Searlee.  Mr 
Searlea  said  that  he^was;  very  anxious  about  his  holding. 

When  I  again  asked  Mr  Searles  for  money  to  pay  the  Phonograph 
Works,  to-day,  he  said  he  had  no  money  for  them,  so  I  simply  let 
the  matter  drop,  and  if  the  Works  make  a  fuss  about  it,  they  can 
fight  it  out  wi th  him. 

You  did  not  send  on  the  English  translation  of  the  French 
contraot,  which  you  seem  to  lay  stress  upon  in  your  letter  of 
April  25th,  and)  from  such  knowledge  of  French  as  I  possess?  I  found 
that  the  English  translation  which  you  sent  me  the  previous  mail 
was  just  about  the  same?  as  the  French  copy  just  now  received,  with 
the  exception  of  two  short  clauses?,  which  I  have  added,  however 
Mr  Searles  was  not  satified!  that  the  translation  was  correct,  and 
X  am  having  one  mad®  to  hand  to  him  to-morrow  morning  oua 

There  may  be  some  alteration  suggested,  such  a®  a  mor® 
clearly  defined)  clause  to  the  effect  that  the  French  Company  must 
buy  all  of  their  Phonographs  and  Supplies  in  the  future  from  us 
only. 

Mr  Searles  was  also  criticised  the  fact  that  to  are  supplying 
the  Edison  Bell  with  No.  2  machine®  as  $9.00,  and  their  printed  con 
tract  states  this  very  clearly,  therefbre  as  the  French  contract 
stipulates  that  we  cannot  charge  the  French  company  more  than  we 
charge  the  English  Company,  he  is  afraid  this  will  cauB®  some  future 


comflict. 


The  matter  of  Type  3  Phonographs  will  also  be  discussed  to- 
tnorrowi  and  I  am  afraid  he  will  consider  the  price  too  low',  for 
such  estimates  as  we  receivedfrom  the  Phonograph  Works  in  1897  and 
1898  were  too  high,  but  little  attention  was  given  to  the  figure® 
then-,  as  you  did  not  expect  to  send  any  orders  for  that  type?  . 

I  am  writing  this  letter  hurriedly  to  go  by  Tuesday’s 
steamer,  and  I  have  just  been  informed  by  F.  M.  Prescott,  by  tele 
phon®  that  a  Clerk  of  his  who  lives  in  Newark,  has  ascertained 
that  the  "Bdisonia"  company  of  that  City,  whoBe  card  you  will  find 
upon  the  cut  of  the  GEM  machines  which  I  sent  you  some  time  ago, 
had  received  an  order  for  Germany  from  some  house  in  JNew  York, 
whom  we-  guess  to  be  Volkmann,  Stollwerck  &  Co.,  for  200  Typ®  2 
100  "Home-"  Phonographs  and  300  of  the  GEM  and  the  Large  CONCERT 
GRAND  Phonograph®,  a  total  pf  500. 

If  this  is  Volkmann,  it  is  only  another  of  the  orders 
which  they  have  repeatedly  placed  in  this  country  independently 
of  this  Company yp  / 

Yours  very  truly. 


Secretary. 


S.  F.  Moriarty,  Esq., 

Edison  House, 

Northumberland  Avenue'*', 
tondon,  England. 

Dear  Sir:- 

Your  letters  of  the  25th,  26th  and  23th  received.  The  letter 
of  the  25th  did  not  contain  the  translation  of  the  French  contract, 
hence  1  am  obliged  to  have  onejmade  here  today  and  cannot  reply  by  this 
steamer.  I  shall  try  to  cable  you  tomorrow  and  send  power  of  attorney 
on  Wednesday. 

Regarding  Edison-Bell  proposition,  I  haveknstructed  Mr. 

Morrison  to  write  you  officially  stating  that  in  view  of  the  long  delay 
and 

in  receiving^? aylng  for  the  2000  machines,  we  shall  insist  upon  payment 
in  full  on  shipment,  or  if  the  E-B  Company  require  the  letter  of  the 
contract,  we  shall  exact  payment  of  interests  since  September  on  the 
delayed  payments.  It  is  very  small  and  picayune  in  the  English  people 
under  the  circumstances  to  hesitate  regarding  this  matter. 

We  have  no:  agreement  with  the  Edison  Company  which  provides 
for  breakages,  but  when  a  proper  specific  claim  is  made,  will  do  what 
we  can  to  collect  the  difference. 

On  the  automatic  machines,  however,  your  claim  is  entirely 
untenable  and  we  shall  decline  to  allow  it. 

I  see  that  your  new; organization  of  the  E-B  Company  drags  and 

is  as  indefinite  as  ever,  which.,  is  exceedingly  discouraging.  The  months 

embarrassing 

drag  wearily  on  and  bring  no  relief  from  the  present ^financial  con¬ 
ditions.  How  long  must  this  continue? 


EDISON  UNITED'  PHONOGRAPH  COMPANY 

S.  P.  Moriarty,  Esq.,  New  York,  May  12th,  1899. 

London,  England. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriarty:-  •  t. 

I  have  been  trying  for  some  time  to  induce  Mr  Searles  to 
go  up  town  with  me  and  see  the  various  styles  of  Multiplex  machines 
and  I  went  around  to  his  hotel  this  morning  at  half  past  eight,  and 
found  him  at  breakfast  with  Mrs.  Searles,  and  made  him  promise  to 
go  around  there  with  me  in  the  course  of  an  hour,  and  he  kept  his 
wordt 

He  was  very  much  pleased  with  the  machines,  and  Mr  Gress' 
will  give  him  a  commercial  machine  to  put  o#  his  desk. 

Mr  Searles-  does  not  want  to  send  models  of  the  new  type 
Multiplex  until  we  get  another  order  for  some  more  of  the  same 
style  as  we  sent  on  the  first  order,  but  they  have  been  re-modeled 
and  are  much  superior  to  the  first  loit,  as  Gress  has  had  the 
experience  in  manufacturing  them,  and  ha3  hired  the  best  experts  to 
improve  them,  so  that  he  claims  they  are  no^p  100#  better  than  hhe: 
first  order, 

In  view  of  Mr  Searles  wishes  in  this  matter,  please  do  n 

not  make  any  feature  or  in  fbct  say  anything  about  any  new  models 

of  other  styles^  as  he  wants  to  bring  these  out  after- we  get  your 
which  is? 

order^ in  contemplation. 

On  the  way  down  town  I  showed  Mr  Searles?  all  your  various 
letter®  of  May  2ndi,  which  he  read  through,  but  he  will  not  see> 
anything  ala.  mlu  ..  g8t 


-2- 

aome  substantial  orders  for  machine®,  therefore  there  is  no  possi¬ 
bility  at  the  present  moment  of  quoting  the  Edison  Bell  anything 
lesa-  on  cylinders  as  indicated  in  your  letter. 

Mr  Searles  directed  me  to  send  a  cable  to  you  to-day 
with  the  termsof 

to  the  effect  that  he  would  not  ship  any  goods  ire  accordance'  with 

A 

the  letter  to  him  of  May  3rd!,  nor  will  he  consent  to  their  demand 

that  10#  of  the  bill  for  cylinders  shall  remain  unpaid!  until  they 

check  the  good®  and  render  an  account  of  breakages*  this  is  a  thing 
it 

that  the  Works  would  not  consent  to,  and  would!  therefore  be 

A 

impossible  for  this  company  to  grant  it. 

The  profit  on  cylinders  is  very  small  indeed1,  and  does 
not  permit  us  to  run  any  risk  whatever  in  regard  to  payment 

Gress  will  not  allow  anything  upon:  the  Automatics,  and 
their  account  is  paid  in  full,  and  there  is  no  way  by  which  we  can 
force  them  to  do  so,  even  if  we  thought  it.  good  policy,  to  do  so, 
which  we  do  not. 

Mr  Searles  asked  me  to-day  whether  I  had  written  you  to  charge 
interest  on  the  machines  for  the  E  disotf  Beil  Company  from  say 
September- 17th,  1898,  and  I  said  I  hadl 

You  cabled!  last  week  that  you  thought  you  would  be  able; 
to  remit  us  $618.  to  pay  for  Cabinets,  but  this  has  not  come  to 
hand  at  this  writing*  and  I  am  in  now  hourly  expectation  of  hearing 
some  thing  disagreeable  from  them,  and  Mr  Searles  will  not  pay  the 
bill,  so  the  matter-  must  take  its  course’.  . 

'  '  •  *  ;  •  ;*  d-trll/J?  J - 


P.s.  Mr  Searles  is  beginning  to  distrust  the  Edison  Bell  so  much 
on  account  of  their  repeated  claims?,  that  he  is  afraid  that  even 
his  short  time  Drafts?  will  not  be  pai^l  and  he  was  almost  inclined! 
to-day  to  cable  you  that  they  must  remit  the  money  here?,  this  is 
partly  due  to  their  demand  for  £528.  which  they  want  deducted!  from 
the  bill  for  700  Machines  when  they  are  shipped),  goods  upon  which 
we  make  no  profit  whatever-. 


May  12,  1899. 


Mr.  8.  E.  Moriarty, 

Edison  House, 

Northumberland  Avenue, 
London,  England. 


Dear  Sir:- 

Your  letter  of  the  3rd  inst.  received.  I  am  surprised 
beyond  measure  at  the  proposition  submitted  by  the  Edison-Bell 
people  regarding  terms  of  shipment  and  payment.  I  cannot  under¬ 
stand  how  you  could  have  entertained  these  for  a  moment.  I  have 
instructed  Mr.  Morrison  to  cable  you  that  they  arejunaccoptable  and 
we  shall  make  no  shipments  until  they  can  be  made  on  a  proper 
basis.  I  am  more  arid  more  disgusted  with  the  actions  of  the 
managers  of  this  property,  and  I  must  confess  that  it  seems  to  mo 
they  are  treating  you  without  the  slightest  respect  or  considera¬ 
tion.  They  seem  to  feel  that  they  can  pay  wiien  they  like  and 
make  you  any  kind  of  proposition  they  see  fit.  We  shall  make  no 
concessions  of  any  description  not  included  in  the  contract,  turd 
unless  they  send  the  cash  to  pay  for  the  No.  2  machines  and  the 
balance  of  the  automatics,  we  shall  certainly,  insist  upon  the  pay¬ 
ment  of  interest  on  the  account  from  the  date  the  machines  were 
tendered. 

I  need  not  repeat  that  it  is  useless  to  call  upon  Mr. 

Edison  for  concessions  as  to  price  or  better  treatment  at  his  hands 
while  we  are  in  default  as  now  on  the  business  of  1898. 

Yours  very 


14  Royal  Avenue 


Chelsea,  g.  w. 
14  May  1899 


Dear  Lord  Denbigh, 

I  have  been  thinking  over  our  position  with  regard  to  our 
large  stock  of  Ho  2  type  of  Phonographs  in  the  light  of  our  review 
of  the  financial  position  last  Friday  and  it  seems  to  me  we  must  do 
something  to  turn  the  bulk  of  these  into  cash  quiokly  or  disaster 
to  the  Company  must  result.  Unless  some  better  scheme  is  proposed 
I  think  we  ought  to  try  what  the  effect  of  a  reduction  in  price 
to  the  public  acooiqpanied  by  advertisements  will  bo.  What  I  should 
like  would  be  to  reduce  the  price  from  £6-6-0  to  £5  as  from  the 
1st  July  next  to  the  public  and  in  order  to  meet  the  trade  at  once 
notifying  them  of  our  intention  to  do  this  intimating  at  the  same 
time  that  the  wholesale  price  in  view  of  proposed  reduction  would 
in  future  be  £3-10-0  instead  of  £4-4-0  as  at  present,  this  reduction 
to  commence  at  once  so  as  to  lot  the  trade  down  easily  and  not  to 
await  reduced  retail  rate.  In  spite  of  Mr  Pratts  views  I  can  not 
help  thinking  that  sdoh  a  substantial  reduction  in  price  must  affect 
the  demand  for  machines  and  the  fact  that  once  reduced  the  price 


cannot  agAin  be  raised  does  not  frighten  me,  as  dearly  we  must  red¬ 
uce  the  price  shortly  to  meet  competition  and  if  we  cut  our  prices 
as  low  as  possible  before  competition  commences  the  stronger  we  make 
our  position  and  the  less  encouragement  there  is  for  others  to 
compete  against  us  after  they  oan  come  into  the  market. 

I  am  sending  a  copy  of  this  letter  to  the  other  directors. 


Yours  truly  - - — 


W.H.Quayle  Jones. 


Dear  Mr  Moriarty, 

Gouraud . 


I  am  sorry  to  say  that,  as  I  rather  anticipated,  this  appeal 
was  dismissed,  the  Court  being  of  opinion  that  your  Company  does  suf¬ 
ficient  business  in  England  to  give  the  English 'Courts  Jurisdiction. 
You  must  now  therefore  be  prepared  to  contest  the  case  here  and  I 
have  to  suggest  that  you  should  at:  once,  if  you  have  not  already  done 


Stephen  F.  Moriarty  Esq., 

Edison  House, 

Northumberland  Avenue,  W.C. 


Nevr  York,  May  18th,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriarty:-  PERSONAL. 

I  have  asked  Mr  Searles  a  number  of  times  to  settle  the 
account  of  the  Works  and  for  the  cabinets,  and  last  evening  I 
waited!  a  hour  and  a  half  in  his  office*  until  it  was  so  late,  I  couS^ 
accomplish  nothing,  as  there  were  a  lot  of  coitten  men  there1,  and 
they  always  hold  the  fort  when  they  are  around),  however josoctaxWiihs- 

if  if*-':  the  fact  that  this  business  kept  me  awake  last  night  until 
and) 

half  past  one  O'.eloek*  I  determined!  to  see  him  again  this  morning 
and  he?  rather  expected  me  I  think  for  I  had  asked  him  in  the  half 

minute  I  saw  him  yesterday  whether  he  would  be  in  his  office  to-day 

„  ,  .  .  for  he  knew  what  I  wanted) 

He  had  evidently  been  thinking  over  the  mattery  and  acted 

as  if  he  had  made  up  his  mind  to  pay  up  entirely  everything  that  we 

owe;,  and  incurr  no  more  debts-,  and  ift  fact  he  said  he  would  not 

incurr  any  more  debts  or  ship  any  more  goods  without  the  money. 

I  showed  him  a  letter  I  had  received  from  the  Phonograph 

Works  received  on  the  16th  in  regard  to  their  account,  which  he 

paid  in  fall  $3,955.18  also  I  got  a  check  for  $372.  on  account  of 

the  Cabinets,  the  remainder  as  well  as  a  bill  of  $250.  to  the 

Fidelity  and  Safe  Deposit  Company,  for  the  Edison  Bell  Bona,  he 

will  pay  when  obliged  to,  but  as  I  said  before  it  was  only  paid 

because  there  was  no  other  way  out  of  it,  and  he  has  determined  to 

ascertain:  just  how  he  stands?  abroad),  and  for  that  purpose  he>  gggfgt 

will  utilize  a  man  he  know®,  an  Accountant  who  sail^May  20th^to 

look  into  the  accounts?  in  London?  and  render  him  a  statement,  and  re 


-2- 

port  to  him,  but  he  may  not  do  this  when  it  comas  to  the  points  still 
you  better  be  prepared!. to  give  him  what  information  he  requires*, 

I  asked  him  not  to  do  this,  but  he  said  he  might  as  well1 

know  where  he  stands  first  as  last,  and  evidently  has* no  hope  for 
the  future  of  the  Company. 

Arguments  in  the  faae?  of  the  long  delays  in  concluding 
the  negotiations  in  London  and  Paris* and  the  other  discouragements* 
in  connection  with  the  business  for  so  long  a  time?  avail  nothing 
now*,  and  the  only  thing  for  you  to  do  is  to  come  here  yourself; 
backed  by  such  documents ras  will  back  you  up. 

Your  Check  foir  $250.  from  Paris?,  through  J.  P.  Morgan  & 
Co.  was*  received!  by  mq, but ‘?noft  until  after- X  had  succeeded  ira 
getting  a  check  for  $3572.  from  Mr  Searles-,  which  as  I  stated  before 
was  only  paid!  because  he  had  made-  up  his  mindi  to  pay  up  everything 

and  then  put  a  stop  to  incurring  any  more  bills,  unless- he  got:. 

/<r 

money^pay  for  them,  but  this  does  not  pay  the  Cabinet  bill  in  full. 
In  talking  with  Mr  Searles  about  the*  prices  of  Blank®,  0 
I  said  to  him,  if  you  can  only  get  one  cent  reduction  from  Edison 
on  this  order  it  wiill  mean.. a  profit  to  u®  of  $500.,  and  he-  called 
his  stenographer  in*  and  wrote  the  Works  asking-  for  a  reduction  in 
price*,  which  he  wanted  to  make  at  .08  l/2  cents,  but  I  suggested. 
.08/  and  that  he  really  ought  to  get  them  for  .07/  so  the  letter 
went  off  at  eight  cent®  for  100,000,  and  I  will’ write  you  as*  soon 
as  we  get  a  reply  as  to  whether  we?  get  any  reduction  or  not.. 

I  showed  Mr  Searles*  your  several  letters*  of  May  5th,  a® 
weO  a®  the  confidential  letter  to  me  of  May  5fh.  as  !  saw- 


tion  to  doing  so,  but  he  took  exception  to  your  remarks  about  the 
financial  position  in  Americas,  which  you  refer  to  in  your  confiden¬ 
tial  letter  to  me;,  similar  remarks  to  which  you  make  in  your 
Company  letter  on  page  3i  and  S,  and  I  said  to  Mr  Searless  that 
probably  your  reasons  for  writing  so  was;  that  I  had  been  writing 
you  frequently  in  regard  to  money. 

If  this  man  gts  off;  or  rather  if' Mr  Searlesinstrucif him 
to  call  upon  you/  it.  seems  to  me1  it  would  be  rathexr  to  your 
advantage  than  not  tto  have  Mr  Searles-'  own  man  submit  a  report, 
because  in  that  etfenfe  there  would  be  no  gainaaying-^and  it  will 
make  matters  perfectly  clear  to  him,  and  will  probably  help  you  to 
come  to  an  underdtanding:  when  you  get  here. 

Mr  Searles  does  not  approve  at  all  of  your  allowing  the 
1528.  to  the  Edison  Bell,  to  which  you  refen  in  a  recent  letter,  ad./ 
particularly  to  permitting  this^from^-The  Type  2  machine  mash  in* 
order. 

Yourc’able  off  May  17th  is  received),  and  we  understand 
that  you> are  endeavoring  to  have  them  retract  the  stipulation  in 
regard  to  1528.  so  far  as  it  relates  to  the  deduction  on  the  ship¬ 
ment. 

I  will  write  you  by  next  mail  whether  we  placed  the  order 
for  the  50{)000  Blank®  which  I  think  we  will1  do. 


This  i..^  Friday,  P.  M. ,  and  I  have  heard  nothing  more!  in 
regard  to  the  Ao  count  ant  going  abroad1,  and  I  do  not  know  whether 
Mr  Searlea-.  has  finally  decidedl  to  let  him  call  upon  you  or  not,  t 
therefore  I  hesitate  cabling  you',  in  addition  to  which,  if  I  were 
to  say  anything  more  to  Mr  Searlea? he  might  direct  me  not  to  notify 
you,  and  if  I  did  so,  and  he  were  cognizant  of  it,  he  might  not  be 
willing  to  let  me  know  anything  in  the  futures,  so  T  will  just  think 
it  over-  between  now  and  next  weok. 

Of  course  an  accountant,  even  with  a  letter  from  the 
President,  could  not  suddenly  walk  into  your  offic®  and  demand  to 
know  everything  about  your  business?  or  accounts^  and  he  would  have 
to  call,  back  when  you  made?  an  appointment  for  him,  and  a  cable? 
might  give  you  a  mis-apprehension?  of  his  mission,  for  as  I  under1- 
stand  it  he  wants  to  knowhow  he  stands,  and  he  has  expressed 
doubts'  as  to  whether  the  French  business- would  go  through  at  all, 
asAit  was  practically  concluded  when  he  was  in1  London). 

Mr  Searles  does  not  know  either  whether  or  not  you  have 


y.^and  whether-  it^not  hypothecated). 


These  remarks  are  strictly  confidential,  andndoubtless?  an 


interview  with  you  will  clear  up  all  measure  of  doubt  about  every¬ 


thing-. 


When  I  showed  Mr  Searlei 


your  telegram  sending  me  th< 


-5- 

check  for  $250.,  he  was  surprised  at  receiving  if. 

These  things  that  I  write  in  this  letter-  are  told  to  you 
by  me--,  whioh  is  very  different  from  Mr  Searless  saying  them  to  you 
which  ha  probably  would  not  do,  as  they  come  to  me  through  my  eon- 
versatiomflwith  him-,  so  do  not  take  umbrages  unnecessarily^ & 

let  me  make  a  suggestion,  if  you  feel  like  hitting  some¬ 
body,  think  twice),  and  reserve  it  until  you  get  hene>,  then  you  can 
hit  as  hard  as  you  choose  with  a  complete  understanding  back  of  you 
of  the  entire  situation  on  both  sides  of  the  water. 

If  this  accountant  calls-  and  you  objects  to  anything  he 
ma*  demand),  frame  an  intelligent  cable  to  Mr  Sear  lee,  and  askt*  to 
have  it  postponed;  if  you  think  it  wise  to  do  this,  but  my  own 
impression  i*  that  it  will  not  only  not  do  you  any  ham,  but  on  the 
contrary  be  of  services. 


Yours  very  t  ruly. 


fli'niusutni'S.- ©rimtal  <£tonu  J&nmjatiim  tfirmpauu, 
/22. 

^  24*  I899- 


We  have  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  of 
the  I8th  instant  making  formal  application  for  the  leasing  of 
the  firBt  floor  of  "Edison  House"  Northumberland  Avenue,  and 
in  reply  write  to  say  that  we  have  not  made  up  our  minds  as  to 
what  part  of  the  house  we  shall  let,  but  will  bear  your  request 
in  mind.  We  have, however,  already  several  applications. 

Yours  faithfully, 


one  N°4205. 


Dear  Sir, 


For  the  Managing  Directors. 


S.  F.  Moriarty  Esq., 

16  Craven  Street, 


Charing  Cross,  W.  C, 


ifl  c*~r^u  Ony  y  •t^M^^lyf  <r^  /Q-fU\/ 

(j)0  ,y^tn,  -urA-c^ij  J  o^x,  tr^C-^y 

(.jLL>i  ^U^’LX.'d^yxf cc'ttZ-^)  /'L<r\J 

j^lMyyx.^  (^  Lrxmx  f~  ^ 

ervt,/  Pu^]  i^r'fL^i/. 

UnAJb  6fJ  i!^  <rr^  W-Tn^ela^pT\ 

o^iU*-L*  oLcuj  ru^>4 

f^rrw  Knh^eca^jc,  L 

UrtLrvr^.  'U^f  ~ 

, £  /o  .  M  U4  C-4-4*^ft-'A'i'  LpUlJ 

jy%-(.p\0  A'V'- tsdjJv ,  J4sX-vxJ-tj  ~L-/xl -M^TDrCJ 

-Auj-i H-vr  hxej  i*sz>cih  c<^P<-rxz>  ci^-^fn 


tJ_  iyu^  a^hi  1 

k^f  ,.‘  f  *“■  •■  tLUJ~ 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Berlin 

Bad  Str  37  a  T. 

May  25th  1B99. 

Messrs  Riddell  Vaizey  &  Smith 
London. 

Boars irs  , 

I  confirm  my  last  letter  to  you  and  on  the  12th  inst 
I  recoivod  a  P.  C.  from  your  representative  (Mr  Courtenay) 
asking  mo  to  call  upon  him  During  the  time  he  was  here  I 
informed  him  that  1  should  very  likely  bo  leaving  Berlin 
shortly  and  I  am  now  in  a  position  to  inform  you  that  I 
shall  leave  Berlin  on  tho  1st  or  2nd  of  June  for  good  .  On 
the  13th  inst  Mr  Courtenay  wrote  you  asking  for  a  remittance 
of  the  £16.  0.  10.  which  are  due  to  me.  I  must  say  that 
I  was  greatly  surprised  when  your  Mr  Courtenay  informed  me 
that  you  told  him  to  tell  me  that  as  regards  the  money  "that 
was  all  right"  I  am  not  a  man  of  independent  means  and  when 
I  continued  the  investigation  I  thereby  sacrificed  a  birth 
so>  that  making  enquiries  for  you  has  up  to  the  present  brought 
me  but  a  loss  nevertheless  I  have  done  everything  I  could  for 
your  Mr  Courtenay  when  here  and  also  upon  receipt  of  the  wire 
I  gave  same  my  immediate  attention  I  neod  not  tell  you  that 
I  shall  want  the  money  befoi'e  I  leave  Berlin  and  I  trust  you 
will  be  kind  enough  to  send  mo  a  choque  per  return  of  post. 
Enclosed  X  send  you  a  cutting  of  a  Berlin  paper  and  from 
enquiries  made  1  hear  that  they  are  already  doing  a  good 
business.  Besides  this  there  is  anothor  Company  starting  in 
a  month: or  two  for  the  manufacture  and  sale  of  Phonographs 
not  only  for  Germany  but  for  all  over  Europe.  As  I  informed 
your  Mr  Courtenay  should  Mr  Moriarty  haved  wished  it  I  can 
prove  that  the  cutting  in  wax  was  patented  herein  Germany  * 
by  Edison  and  that  it  was  not  previously  known  in  this  Country 


[ENCLOSURE] 


I  have  found  this  out  after  a  very  careful  study  of  the  patent 
whichhas  not  only  taken  time  but  also  cost  a  lot  of  trouble 
and  I  am  sorry  that  I  am  now  leaving  the  Country  as  I  am 
sure  that  if  the  Phonograph  had  boon  properly  managed  a  large 
business  would  have  been  done  ,  but  I  wish  Mr  Moriarty  success 
in  this  case. 

May  I  once  more  ask  you  to  send  me  a  cheque  by  return 
of  post  as  I  am  now  getting  ready  to  leave  . 

I  remain 

Dear  Sirs, 

Yours  faithfully, 


H.  Bottcher. 


New  York,  May  29th,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriartyt -PERSONAL. 

I  regret  every  hour  of  the  day  almost  that  solid  many 
difficulties  stand  in  .therway  of  filling  orders  promptly,  and  of 
conducting  the  business;  as  it  should  be. 

Last  week  however  I  requested  Mr  Searles--  to  write  a 
letter  to  the  Phonograph  Works,  asking  for  a  better  price  upon 
cylinders,  and  I  enclose  you  herewith  a  copy  of  the  letter  received 
from  them  reducing  the  cost  to  us;  to  .08  85/lOOth  cents?  each  in¬ 
stead  of  .09  20/i00ths, •:  which  will  make  a  saving  to  us  of  $175;.00 
on  50,000  Blanks^  which  is  better  than  nothing  at  all,  although  we? 
should  not  pay  over  .08  cents  at  the  outside;. 

Gilmore  is  going  to  Chicago  on  Tuesday,  and  we  will 
probably  see  him  when  he  returns  as  suggested  in  his  letter  in  re¬ 
gard  to  the  No.  2  Machines’,  but-  I  hope  we  will  receive  orders  from 
you  to  ship  most  of  them  at  least  before  that  time. 

I  shall  looio  for  some  advices  from  you  this  week,  announo 
ing  the-  positive  and  entire  completion  of  the  French  contract;,  and 
I  hope  your  other  business;  will  go  through  smoothly  so  that  you  may 
come  on  here  as  aoon  as  possible,  for  no  business  in  the  world!  can 
be  a  success  as  the  Company  is  conducted  nowi 

Thw  Works  are  very  independent  indeed  with  us  now;  and  Mr  I 
Searles  will  not  order  any  goods  of  any  kindl  unless;  he  has;  here:  a 
certified;  copy/  of  a  resolution  of  the  Board1,  so  if  you  order  any- 


-2- 

thing  mora,  please  bear  this  in  mind  and  send  it  with  the  order, 
so  that  time  may  be  saved. 

I  am  afraid  there  will  ge  some  delay  in  shipping  the  cy¬ 
linders  ordered,  and  as  I  read  Mr  Gilmore’s  letter,  we  need  not  ex¬ 
pect.  the  Works  to  flavor  us?  in  executing  our  orders  promptly. 

I  believe  Mr  Searles  could  alter  this  situation  with  a 
word  if  he  felt  so  disposed,  but  he  seems  mortified  about  the 
whole  situation,  and  nothing  can  be  done  until  you  complete  your 
Work  there. 

Yours  very  truly. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


EDISON  PHONOGRAPH  WORKS, 

Orange,  N.  J.  May  26,  1899. 

Edison  United  Phonograph  Co., 

John  E.  Searle®,  Esq.,  Pres., 

27  William  St.,  New  York. 

Dear  Sir:- 

Your  letter  of  the  18th  came  duly  to  hand,  but  has 
remained  unanswered  due  to  the  writer's  absence  in  the  South. 

On  a  firm  order-  for  not  less  than  fifty  thousand  (50,000) 
blanks;  we  will  make  you  a  firm  net  prior  of  Eight;  and  85/i00  Dollar 
( §8. 85>)  per  one  hundred  (100),  packed),  f.o.b.  dock  New  York  City. 

This  price-  is  made  without  reference!  to  the  contract  between 
your  Company  and  ourselves,  dated  March  11th,  1890.  Terms  of 
payment,  to  be  cash  with  order. 

In  connection!  with  this  matter,  we  desire  to  say  that  we  are 
very  much  overcrowdedl  in  the  wax  department;  at  the  present  time, 
and  should!  you  decide;  to  place  an  order  with  us  it  will  take  some 
little  time  to  fill  same. 

Regarding  the  breakages,  of  course-  there  has  always  been  more1 
or  less-  trouble  as  to  rhis,  and  it  has  always  been  an  open  question 
as  to  whether  the  fault  was  ours*  the  transportation  company's  or 
the  receiverjs,  as  in  the  handling- of  blanks  the  latter  very  often 
break  a  great  many  in  removing  them  from  the  barrels.  This  we;  know 
to  be^the  fact,  hot  only  in  this  country,  but  also  in  shipments; 


[ENCLOSURE] 


-2- 

that  we  have  made  for  your  account  abroad. 

We  note  with  pleasure  that  you  expect  to  send  us  some  further 
advice  this  week  as  to  the  machines  still  held  for  your  account. 
Unless;  we  do  hear  from  you  some  day  this  week,  it  is  the  intention 
of  the  writer  to  go  in  to  see,  you  next  week,  eo  ae  to  decide  once 
for  all  whetherit.  is  your  intention  to  take  these  machines,  or 
whether  we  shall  , consider; the  orders  as  cancelled!  and  make  arrange¬ 
ments;  to  dispose  of  them  to  the  best  possible  advantage,  as  we 
certainly  feel  that  we  have  given  you  every  consideration  in  the 
way  of  extending  time  for  taking  these  goodB  off  our  hands;  and 
we  must  now  decline  to  hold!  them  any  longer  under  any  and  all  cir- 
cumstancesi 

Your 8  very  truly, 

W.  E.  Gilmore, 


General  Manager. 


Bad  Str  37a  1 


Messrs  Riddell  &  Co 


I  received  your  favor  of  the  14th  inst  and  on  the  2nd  inst 
the  advised  remittance  from  Mr  Horrwitz  for  which  I  thank  you.  I 
have  found  out  here  from  Messrs  Sponholz  &  Wrede  that  they  manufact¬ 
ured  for  Stollwerck  275  machines  in  all  and  reserve  parts  for  • 
about  50  machines,  this  is  all  this  firm  have  done  for  Messrs 
Stollwerck  or  rather  the  Deutshhe  Edison  Co.  I  have  received  no 
instructions  from  Mr  Horrwitz  to  proceed  with  any  investigations 
but  I  have  2  persons  in  Cologne  who  are  at  work  for  me  and  I  am 
expecting  further  information  daily.  I  qUite  agree  with  you  that 
the  best  possible  way  is  to  have  the  companys  books  inspected  by 
an  accountant  and  I  could  be  of  very  great  assistance  to  the  account- 
-ant  in  pointing  out  to  him  how  machines  have  been  sold  to  the 
Automatic  Company  (  Stolwerck  &  Co)  which  the  Phonograph  Co  knew 
were  going  to  be  sent  to  foreign  Countries.  I  am  staying  here  in 
Berlin  at  the  above  address  and  all  letters  will  find  me  here.  I 
heard  the  other  day  that  the  Phono  Co  have  a  Bettini  Reproducer 
in  Cologne,  this  was  to  my  knowledge  delivered  by  Mr  Mori  arty 
but  they  have  one  here  as  well  which  is  out  of  order.  I  got  a  friend 
to  go  and  make  inquiries  at  their  offices  here,  they  had  not  got  a 
machine  which  was  in  working  order  and  shewed  their  cylinders 
on  a  Graphophone  purchased  from  an  infringer.  This  will  give  you 
an  idea  of  how  the  business  of  the  company  is  being  ruined  in  Germany 
Enclosed  is  a  cutting  from  the  Cologne  Gazette  in  which  the 


machines  purchased  from  America  e 


i  offered  for  sale.  As  stated 


before  I  have  dieeevewed  discontinued  giving  my  whole  time  for  the 

business  at  your  request  but  I  shall  be  only  too  pleased  to  do  what 

lies  in  my  power  for  Mr  Moriarty,  I  have  spent  4  days  here  in  Berlin 

on  investigation  which  leaves  a  balance  in  my  favor  of  £16-0-10. 

A/c  received  25-0-10 

4  days  Berlin  6 -0-0  ' 

n,  ,  Yours  faithfully 

Cheque  recede  15-0-0  J.Bettcher. 


£  16-0-10 


T&wdw/i 
w£7/it#ri<lrrty,  7m  7?mt>/r.n6 


j7u>mMJ&  S(/tAon;  &  %7?iort/>0ty  $ccnt(vru. 

'***~ya**«  Wnt/w/MJult/a^.m* 


V/jJrm/fymueay, 


27  WILLIAM  STREET, 


S.  P.  Mori  arty,  Esq., 

London,  England. 

Dear  Sir:- 

Mr  Searles  showed  me  your  cable  in  which  you  say  the 
French  Company  have  signed  and  I  am  pleased  to  hear  it,  but  he 
requested  me  to  cable  you  which  I  am  confirming  by  this  mail. 

He  wants  your  old  matters  all  settled  up  before  you  come 
away,  and  X  hope;  we  will  be  able  to  fix  up  all  differences  and  put 
the  Company  on  a  more  satisfactory  basis  when  you  come  on. 

I  will  be  very  glad  to  see  you. 

Mr  Searles  wants  to  draw  the  Drafts  for  the  cylinders 
at  3  days  and  30  days  sight  the  very  day  we  make  the  shipment,  not 
as  the  letter  of  the  Edison  Bell  Consolidated  Phonograph  Company 
reads.  "One  half  against  bill  of  Lading  and  the  other  half  30 
days  after  delivery"  in  London,  and,  I  cabled  you  to  this  effect. 

In  consequence  of  this  we  have  not  yet  ordered  the  goods 
and  there  will  certainly  be  some  delay  in  filling  the  order  by  the 
Works  so  they  will  not  get  the  goods  as  promptly  as  they  should,  bu 
but  I  will  try  to  hurry  them  when  we  get  a  reply  to  our  cable. 

I  am  trying  to  sell  the  12  Cabinets  I  have  here.  GreBS 


expects  to  put  out  his  Commercial  machines  here  shortly.  I  think 
at  $125. each  and  if  he  keeps  this  price  up  it  will  satisfy  me  until 
we  know  what  we  want  to  do  about. them. . 


Werrwill  get  his  goods’ probably  at  cost  with  $1.00  addi¬ 
tional  as  I  have  arranged  with  him,  but  I  will  write  you  again 
about  it. 

you  need  not  feel  uneasy, about  it,  no  complications  will 

Yours  very  truly. 

Secretary. 


result. 


. 

*  EDI»  *  OjMI^FED  *  PJI0P6WJJ  +  (SSfSSf^sf 


Temporary  Address.- 
15,  CRAVEN  STREET, 
CHARING  CROSS,  S.W. 

J.U  Letter,  to  be  addreued  to  the  C 


EDISON  HOUSE, 


Northumberland  Avenue, 

Charing  Cross,  W.C. 


8tn  June  1899. 

Dear  Mr  Moriarty, 

Confirming  my  letter  of  last  night  X  went  to  see 
Mr  Pratt  this  morning,  but  he  was  very  busy  with  a  gentleman,  and  X 
could  not  see  him.  X  however  was  referred  to  Mr  Slater,  who  informed  i 
that  by  a  resolution  of  the  Board  passed  yesterday,  no  money  wrn  to  b( 
paid  to  the  Edison  United  Co?  until  the  agreement  was  completed  that 
was  entered  into  for  the  handing  over  to  the  Edison-Bell  Cos  of  the 
Multiplex  and  the  Bettini  patents,  and  that  a  letter  was  to  be  sent 
to  this  effect.  Up  to  the  time  of  writing  no  such  letter  has  come,  bu< 
I  wired  you  at  once  the  gist  of  the<bove,  and  have  had  your  reply  to 
the  same.  I  have  nothing  further  to  say  in  the  matter  more  than  what 
was  contained  in  the  wire  to  you  that  the  Edison-Bell  Co:  will  not 
pay  over  any  more  money  until  this  transfer  of  the  patents  is  a  fait 
accompli.  I  have  cabled  to  Uniphone  Now— Yorh  in  the  way  you  instructed 
me,  and  of  course  will  say  nothing  to  Mr  Pratt. 

I  regret  to  say  that  Mr  Pratts  promise  about  the  cabinets  was  nol 
carried  out,  as  a  letter  came  from,  the  Transport  Co:  this  morning, 
copy  of  which  I  enclose  you,  ix nd  I  ashed  an  explanation.  Mr  Slater 
said  that  they  had  no  room  for  the  storing  of  the  oabinets,  as  they  ai 


getting  goods  in  from  Knight  A  Morris 


i  to  save  storage  charges. 


He  told  me  Mr  Pratt  was  not  at  the  Board  meeting  that  this  was  agreed 
upon,  and  therefore  gave  tie  promise  to  tahe  over  the  cabinets  in 
ignorance.  I  had  no  alternative  therefore  but  to  go  and  see  the 
Transport.  Co:  and  ash  than  to  leave  the  matter  over  for  another  day. 


•*  EDI30N  +  UNITED  4-  PH0N06WP  4*  COMPLY,  *• 

Temporary  Address: 


,*  fr,tr7"  EDISON  HOUSE, 

15,  CRAVEN  STREET, 

charing  CROSS,  SAW.  Northumberland  Avenue, 

AU  Letters  to  be  addreued  to  the  Company.  Charing  CrOSS,  W.C. 


cabinets.  They  must  be  paid  for,  and  what  I  would  suggest  would  be  fo 
you  to  wire  me  in  the  moaning  authorising  me  top  pap  the  amount  due 
£6-7-2,  and  that  I  should  have  them  forwarded  to  Knight  &  Morris  to 
store  on  our  account,  or  have  them  removed  into  our  own  store. 

Any-way  if  you  authorise  me  to  pay  incltf^  thi seamount  of  £6-7-2  in  t 
cheque  that  you  send  me.  I  jhav|»  got  the  t'ranrf'fio v  Oo:  to  leave  the 
matter  over  8ntil  to-mo rrow^mid-day ,  so  please  wire  me  the  very  first 
thing  in. the  morning.  Otherwise  I  fear  they  will  carry  out  their 
threat.  They  were  very  courteous  to  me,  but  said  they  must  insist  upo 
the  matter  being  aleared  up  to-morrow  definitely,  so  therefore  if  I 
get  your  authority  I  can  pay  them  the  cheque,  as  you  will  follow  your 
wire  up  with  the  necess^y  amount  to  be  paid  them. 

It  is  also  necessary  to  send  me  £3-9-a  for  the  rent.  It  has  bees 
again  called  for,  and  this  is  an  item  you  know  that  must  be  paid  for. 

I  can  get  no  satisfaction  out  of  Mr  Pratt  for  the  drawing  of  ths 
cylinders.  I  sent  a  note  in  to  him  this  morning,  and  he  sent  out  wore 
that  he  would  write  about  the  matter,  but  up  to  the  moment  of  writing 
no  such  note  has  come. 


I  endose  a  list  of  the  documents  etc  that  Messrs  Thirion  &  Bonin 


have  received  from 


wr.fj.  8  June  1899. 


Dear  Mr  Morlarty, 

Coates  v  Yourself. 

I  have  been  in  communication  with  the  plaintiffs  Solicitors 
and  think  that  this  matter  will  now  be  satisfactorily  settled  Upon 
the  terms  discussed  when  I  last  had  the  pleasure  of  seeing  you. 

You  will  fee  glad  to  learn  that  the  agreement  with  the 

Scottish  Syndicate  has  to-day  been  signed. 

1 

When  can  I  see  you.'  I  am  anxious  to  do  so  in  connection 
with  the  German  business. 


S.E.Moriarty  Esq 

15  Craven  Street 


Strand. 


Now  York,  June  10th,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriarty:-  PERSONAL. 

I  enclose  you  a  /ittle  memorandum  I  have  written  as  a 
result  of  Mr  Prescott’s  call  this  morning,  and  he  desired  me  to 
say  that  he  does  not  want  you  to  think  that  he  has  been  soliciting 
this  information  from  Hunting,  as  it  came  voluntarily  from  Hunting 
Please  note  the  words  in  the  mmemorandum  which  read  a® 

follows: - 

"There  is  a  screw  loose  here  at  our  friends  place  in  0  X  roadl 

Can  it  be  possible  that  Hunting  is  able  to  find  out  anything: 
about  what  you;  are  doing:,  or  has  learnt  anything  about  the  re-organ 
lxation:of  the  Edison  Bell,  if  so,  had  you  not  better  put  a  stop  to 
it  and  prevent  the  subject  being  discussed  on  this  side. 

Prescott,  asked  me  whether1  we  had  anything  from  you  in  regard 
to  Gram-o-phone  matters,  and  I  said  of  course  that  we  had'  not. 

It  looks  very  much  as  if  Owen  and  the  other®  felt  more- 
confident  if  they  are  taking  Records-  in  the  different  languages, 
and  going  to  that  expense,  and  it  is  worthy  of  note  that  Johnson  is 
now  over  there. 

Yours  very  truly. 


7?rau/enf,  S^/dont  S.  72tflfamont  dtccntaru. 

&,tc/i.mn/ JYiffna'/fy,  H&c  ZJrrjt>/r,uf<  jtfdriiory  SforccfoK'  7^?it/in>/l/7/A<!/uff./t:' TrettMn 


London,  England. 
Dear  Sir:- 


In  reply  to  your  cable  of  June  8th,  we  are  sending  you 
to-day  the  following  papers. 

English  Patent  No.  6923/98  from  George  Valentine  Grass  for  Improve¬ 
ments  in  Phonographs,  dated  March  22nd,  1898. 


The  Assignment  for  the  above  Patent  to  the  Edison  Unite* Phono 
graph  Company,  is  in  the  possession  of  Mr  John  E.  Searles,  which  he 
cannot  find  without  some  trouble,  and  does  not  think  it  is  necessary 
to  send  ilt.  q 


One  Assignment  from  the  Edison  United  Phonograph  Company  to  the 
Edison  Bell  Consolidate*.  Phonograph  Company,  Limited,  London,  dated 
June  14th,  1899,  executed  by  John  E.  Searles?,  President  and 
attested!  by  the  Secretary,  and  by  the  County  Clerk  and  the  English 


English  Patent  No.  14803/98,  dated!  July  5th,  1898  for  Improvements 
in  Apparatus  for  Reproducing  Sound  Records?,  from  Gianni  Bettini. 

One  Assignment  from  Gianni  Bettini  to  the  : 

Company,  dated  January  19th,  1899 

One  Assignment  of  above  Patent  from  the  Edison  United  Phonograph 
Company  to  the  Edison  Bell  Consolidated  Phonograph  Company,  Limited 
London,  date*  June  14th,  1899. 

You  will  kindly  notice;  that  the  Assignment  for  the  Multi¬ 
ple*  Patent  No.  69235  refers  to  the  Agreement  between  G.  V.  Gross 
and  this  Company,  dated  April  25th,  1898,  and  which  is  made  a  part 


Jft/i/w$.$earJc<),  Zhiu/e/it  TMotnanj^ '  Sdihem  &.  7t77ieriioni  4i*enfarjp. 

<§te/t/ww3T7?lonarfy,  7£c  WnMt/md  Mvor;/ W™t/'w/i'M3utt/c<JZc«. 


of  the  assignment;,  as  explained  in  our  letter  to  you  of  June  8th,  a 
and  in  view  of  this  contract,  it  would  be  better  not  to  deliver 
this  Patent  unless* you  are  compelled  to. 

In  regard  to  the  Patent  from  Gianni  Bettinf,  No.  14803, 
it  would  also  be  advisable  not  to  deliver  this  Patent,  unless  you 
are  compelled  to,  but  if  you  are  obliged  to  hand  the  Edison  Bell 
Consolidated  Phonograph  Company,  Limited,  this  Patent,  Mr  Searles  s 
stipulates  that  an  Agreement  be  executed  by  the  Edison  Bell  Con¬ 
solidated  Phonograph  Company,  Limited  relinquishing:  all  right  to 
manufacture;  under  this  Patent  until  the  terms  of  the  assignment 
from  Gianni  Bettini  with  the  Edison  United'.  Phonograph  Company, 
which  is  in  the  fora  af  an  Agreement  has  been  complied  with,  or 
more  particularly  Clauses  4-th  of  said  Agreement,  the  exact  wording 
for  which  we-  gave  you  in  our  letter  of  June  8th. 

This  Agreement  stipulate®  that  wo  cannot  manufacture 
under  the  said  Patent  fair  three  (3)  years  from  the  date  of  the 
agreement,  say  June  3rd1,  1898,  and  not  then  unless  we  shall  haves 
purchased.  10®  of  the  said  Duplicating  machines  at  prices  named  in 
the  agreement. 


jR/lwS.^eav/ed,  Mcw/ent,  SdtAon:  3.  7'iffleriiem',  (Samfary. 

<$tyi/um£7?l0na'/fy,l&1,  %**&„&  Wnrfm>/vM3ai6x 


For  your  easy  reference  we  attach  to  this  letter,  the 
prices  for  the  Duplicating:  Machine®  as;  narned  in  Article  5th,  of 
which  the  attached!  is  an  exact  copy. 

Yours  very  truly', 

tf/Hsrrcirx^i^^  ' 


Secretary. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


[Edison  United  Phonograph  Co.  to  Gianni  Bettini] 
[January  19,  1899] 


Fifth:  The  party  of  the  first  part,  for  himself,  his  legal 

representatives  and  assigns,  agrees  to  sell  and  deliver  to  the  p 
party  of  the  seoond  part  or  its  assigns  within  the  United  States 
such  complete  duplicating:  machines  as  may  at  any  time  be  ordered!  by 
the  party  of  the  s  eoond' part  or  its  assigns  at  the  following  prices 
to  with¬ 
in  lots  of  less  than  twelve’ machines?  $400.  fbr  each  complete1 
duplicating-  machine. 

In  lots  of  twelve  to  twenty1- four  machines;  $375.  each  . 

In  lots  of  twenty- five  to  forty  nine  machines?  $350.  each. 

In  lots  of  fifty  to  ninetjr-nine  machine®  $325.  each  . 

In  lot®  of  one  hundred  machine®  and  upvrard®  $300'  each. 

A1J.  orders?  for  duplicating  machine®  given  by  the  party  of 
the  second  part  or  its  assign®  to  the  party  of  the  first  part,  his 
legal  representative®  or  assign®,  shall  be  paid?  for  ini  cash  upon 
delivery  in  accordanc®  with  the  directions  contained  in  said  order 


New  York,  June  20th,  1899. 

My  Dear  Mr  Moriarty:-  PERSONAL, 

I  have  just  seen  Mr  Searles  this  morning,  and  he  informed 
me  that  he  had  a  stormy  interview  with  Mr  Silmore  the  other  day, 
and  Gilmore,  notified  him  that  i^-he  did  not  take  the  machines  he 
has- in  stock  there,  ordered  by  the  United  Company  for  the  Edison 
Belly  that  he  intended;  to  sell  them  for  what  he  could  get,  making  us 
responsible  for  the  difference. 

Mr  Searles  said  that  it  was  his  intention  to  writer  the 
Edison  Bell  a  formal  letter  to-day,  notifying  them  that  if  they  did 
not  take  the  machines  that  the  Company  would  hojdi  them  responsible 
for  any  loss;  or  damage  sustained. 

I  askedl  Mr  Searles;  whether  he  thought  it  wise  to  write 
such  a  letter  to  the  Edison  Bell  in  the  faoe  of  your  present 
negotiation,  that  it  might  have  the  effect  of  hurting  them  in  some; 
way,  and  he  repliedl  "Oh  he  is  doing:  nothing,  so  it  can't  interfere' 
with  anything  when  he.  is  not  doing  anything". 

You  see  from  this  that  Mr  Searlee  does  not  believe5  that  you 
are;  doing  anything  or  that  your  work  will  amount  to  anything  and 
I  have  told  you  this  before. 

Edison  may  refuse  to  supply  us  with  any  goods;  in  future,  but 
in  any  event  he  will  certainly  demand  cash,  when  an  order  is  placed1, 
so  that  as  we  have  had  an  illustration  already,  you  had  better  be 
prepared,  so  that  there  will  be  no  trouble  in  getting  money  for 


orders. 


-2- 

Since  writing  the  above^  I  have  been  considering:  the  result 
of  any  letter  from  Mr  Searles  to  the  Edison  Bell,  and  I  felt  that 
such  a  letter  might  do  much  harm,  particularly  if  you  were  not 
notified  in  advance:,  therefor®  I  wrote  a  cable  to  you  which  I 
suggested  should  be  sent,  but  Mr  Searlee  crossed  it  out,  and  wrote 
the  following’. 

"Unless  immediate  settlement  for  delayed  shipments-  shall 
"dispose  of  same  your  account  and  loss". 

which  he  directed  me  to  send. 

In  reading  it  over  however  after- 1  oame  up-stairs,  I  con- 
cludedl  that  he  may  have  intended  this  cable  to  go  direct  to  the- 
Edison  Bell,  although  the  one  I  had  submitted  to  him  was  to  you, 
notwithstanding  this  however,  I  decided!  to  cable:  as  per  confirma¬ 
tion  going  forward  to-day. 


Yours  very  trOily, 

4/h/7rvi*^ 


MC 


^JT^  '  /4 i£~'7/tz*  S“-?*-^~ 

AstU*!*-  ^  ^  * _'*~~*'1  ... 

4+-C.  /^'~  . 

^fs.  ^r  f|  T  . ,./.  /(,,/t  X-en**—*C-t**f  &  ^tfc» 

^  /W-  -^)jj 

/icrTi^  t££^<;.  v  // 


r  1/  ■ 

^/C^.  /^Urn^ty%y/y  ^fr  ■ 

)  _  ._  -  *&?& 


.Tohn  E.  Rearles,  Esq.,  Pres., 

27  William  St. ,  Mew  York. 


Dear  Sir: 

Referring  to  the  v/riter's  conversation  with  yon  several  days 
ago,  having  reference  to  the  unfilled  orders  that  we  have  from  your 
Company  for  "Standard",  or  Mo.  2,  phonographs,  we  bee  to  advise  that 
the  total  number  s.till  due  on  order  Ho.  410  is  2075  machines. 

We  also  have  unfilled  orders  from  your  Company  as  follows: 

Order  Ho.  411,  100  "Standard",  or  Mo.  2,  Phonoeraphs. 

"  "  414,  110  Automatic  Reproducers. 

"  "  425,  300  Automatic  Reproducers. 

We  have  been  expectinc  to  receive  advices  from  you  to  make  ship¬ 
ment  of  all  of  the  above  orders,  but  as  yet  we  have  not  had  the  pleasure 
of  hearine  from  you,  consequently,  we  have  reached  the  decision  that 
there  is  nothing  else  for  us  to  do  but  to  unpack  all  of  these  machines 
and  such  other  parts  as  have  been  packed  for  a  long  time  past,  have  them 
thoroughly  overhauled  and  fixed  up,,  so  that  they  can  be  disposed  of 
elsewhere . 

We  now  beg  to  advise  that  we  shall  consider  all  of  the  above  orders 
as  cancelled  by  you  as  of  this  date,  and  we  shall  proceed  Immediately 
to  unpack,  these  machines  and  fix  them  up  so  as  to  be  disposed  of  to  the 
best  advantage,  charging  you  with  the  cost  of  so  doing,  and  in  addition 
to  this  we  shall  also  get  out  and  send  you  just  as  soon  as  possible  a 
bill  for  interest  to  which  we  consider  we  are  entitled,  as  all  of  these 
goods  were  duly  finished,  packed  and  placed  in  stock  subject  to 


New  York,  July  20th,  1899.. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriarty:-  PERSONAL. 

I  am  just  in  receipt  of  your  short  letter  of  July  12th, 
and  I  am  keeping  things  in  statu  quo,  not  only  with  Gross,  but  also 
with  Prescott,,  the  latter  however1  is  preparing:  his  case  against 
Edison,  and  1  think  I  shall  probably  be  able  to  read  it,  but  I  am 
in  no  senses  having  anything  to  do  with  it. 

I  hope  you  wilito  succeed  in  closing  up  all  the  various 
matters  you  have  in  London,  and  will  soon  be  able  to  start  for 
America. 

My  idea  in  regard  to  Edison  is,  that  he  anticipates  the 
closing  out  of  our  Patents  by  limitation,  and  is  fighting  everyone 
who  use 8  his  name',  as  well  S3  anyone  who  uses  his  Speaker,  so  that 
when  he  considers  oUr  Patents  have  lapsed,  or  nearly  so,nhe  will 
push  the  Phonograph  business,  even  more  than  he  is  nowi  with  a  view 

to  securing  it  all  to  himself,  but  it  is  quite  likely  that  ws  will 

l-  aa 

not  be  a  nonenity  ili  the  business  in  future?,  and^I  have  often  said 

before^ the  Gross  Patents  wil,l  be  of  great  service  to  us. 

Gress  talks  about  building  a  factory  on  Long  Island^  and 
says  that  he  can  ship  lumber  direct  from  Kramer  where  their  Mill 
is. 

I  do  not  believe  there  is  much  doubifc,  but  that  he  will 
do  this  at  the  same  time  he  is  looking  forward  to  the  support;  of 
the  United  Company  in  giving  him  orders,  however-^  will  discuss 
this  whole  matter  when  you  get  here1,  at  the  same  time  endeavor  to 


keep  us  free  in  the  matter  of  Manufacture. 


Young  Greae  is  very  impatient,  and  is  beginning-  to  show 
a  lack  of  confidence  in  anything  that  I  may  say  of  an  encouraging 
charaeteir  looking  to  keeping  him  eafcy  until  your  arrival,  therefore 
I  hope  it  will  not  be.  long. 

Referring  to  your  letter  of  July  7th,  and  to  that  portion 
where  you  say  that  you  do  not  want  any  more  Drafts  drawn,  as  you 
have  not  confidence  enough  in  the  Edison  Bell  to  feel  easy  about 
them,  Mr  Searles  began  to  feel  uneasy  about  the;  Draft  which  has-- 
already  gone  for  the  cylinders,  but  I  remarked!  that'  you  could  not 
have  meant  that,  it  was  in  .relation  to  future  orders  . 

Yours. very  truly,. 


New  York,  August  1st,  1899. 

My  dear  Mr  Moriarty?-  PERSONAL. 

I  am  duly  in  receipt  of  your  letter  of  July  22nd,  in 
which  you  state  that  you  will  sail  on  the  CAMPANIA,  leaving  Liver¬ 
pool  Saturday,  July  29th,  but  that  you  will  cable  to  that  effect, 
therefore  as  we  have  not  received  any  cable  we  conclude  that  you 
have  not  sailed,  and  we  are  writing  you  by  this  mail  in  regard  to 
the  order  for  cylinders. 

I  do  not  have  anything  to  do  with  Prescott,  and  he  comes 
in  heee  of  his  own  accord,  but  I  cannot  ask  him  to  walk  out,  and 
I  treat  him  politely,  and  the  rest  remains  for  you. 

I  hope  you  will  be  able  to  have  a  full  meeting  to-morrow 
and  adjust  all  the  various  matters  needing  attention  so  that  you 
will  be  able  to  leave  without  much  more  delay. 

I  was  obliged  to  tell  Mr  Searles  to-day  that  it  was 

necessary  for  us  to  notify  the  Phonograph  Works  to  defer  shipments 

until  further  orders  from  ub  until  financial  matters  were  arranged 

because/lwe  had  not  done  so  fete/  would  go  on  packing  the  goods,  and 
'A  A 

get  up  a  stock,  which  we  might  have  to  order  held  in  the  same 
manner  as  the  No.  2  Machines,  and  we  do  not  want  to  put  ourselves 
again  in  that  ipositiom. 

Please  do  not  fail  to  bring  with  you  full  itemized  detai]£ 
of  your  account  which  appears  on  the  Monthly  Reports^from  the  be¬ 
ginning  to  the  end. 

•  Yours  very  truly,  / 


8,/ 


- ya-v-z)'  yCXiJ5~~'  ^Cv^-l^Xj?  -7  <l 

”=s^^  <7^-C^-e<av  X^Zcry-t. 

X - ">^  _^L  ^  sO-z^j, 

^  -/£  ~c<  «_^  Xei^ct^'7k=i^ 

J)^  -^?8 ‘>V>«-<^.  gL-  7?  c.^ 

//W_  -^/  L-3  ~X  X*-,  — /■>~— •-  -  -  1 

— -J  ^:^T^_^v>-e-<^  ^  ^^'Ci "ZZXH>  ^  f>Wv«-'  /X^i^ 

*4  st^L^c.  «,  v^  ^ 

x*~  <=^_  ?G-w  .=^4^  ~_<=^ 


v^>/ 


^  ’‘^  X-~XX  X 

y^t^U-yi  <^X>  *X~*  <^->Z  ^~<X. UfZ^^^y  «_  J^~X  ^ 

/^-^-e*l  *L  ry^C^-eX  Xc^  ^Xy'  ?'  X 

X<,  ^XkJ  /i^-^-z^ — c^j  tXX^_  **&"! 

str*  rXtf~  »*_cT  /-l^*X'  . 

f‘or^r  ^  C*^-y  J 


[ATTACHMENT] 


ini: 

%(aJUL-  j\^ 
ts  -A£.w  i!s±Cy 
;  V  uv-C^Xw^  — -"  3  4-  UvrV 

Cvv—^C-^-  \a?C<^ 

VvMv^X_^  1^ 


V6w 


[ATTACHMENT] 


I  ^  /)uvt  U/U-r > 

UrrW^  ^  ^-hL'^L|  '°JJ~jJ^ 
L  ttZXa  ls-ttJLL  Ct Ca^-e,  v~  ^  ^ 


JL-  — * 

*irtl  (✓!''-*-■ 


v  — c>v~_<X\.,  cLo^nfc^evJo 


[ATTACHMENT] 


^4- 


^  y^Xn.  *  uw  v\^^|  0-|#  vrtvLirv'.  I\^t)  «*.  <Ze^jt~ 

hr  tnu  iuv-rrri.fi.’ .  U-%.  k- 

XvirwW,  ft-t  ^  'H  r 

^ 

sojL-  ,l^crr:x^-  4^- 

^  lj  S  rr  <1  -  -  4t.~~|  ^ 

'Ilk^'V  H-W-  ^  V 

u  ':a  ^“~ 

^  >v  fkoJ  -G  c  -  iZ__ 

^  ^  _  Tl^'  C*~J3:»  oL J^cJlc^S^.  U«.  >: 

-"iu-  ^-£CL -t  ».  /  " 

r  (  Jsi  XU  ^  ' 

-tt—  c-«—  •  ,^\ 

tcZxrr/^  J  ^  1^ 


[ATTACHMENT! 


jJr 


_  1 #  v- 

r..(L  n  o  t-££V'  C.C<..t  6 


„;Cia—([K 


10-tML  C  ^  <£•■-  { *" 

J  [,  c  ^  c.o  u  .  o 

I  f  j-.  ^  ^  iLc  U  vvcCc  i 

l<?  ■  1  „,_  ^,.  nr/.. , 

]V.»?  u— ^  l” 

•!>'•  ■••  -  lrr.  \,|.  ft'  ■■■ ; 

il  j^y-v 

cvu'~"‘i  ]  ?  J  : 

‘  ,,d 


1 


__  C  T-' « •-  /  .'  - 

:C  iw  P>.K“\  ' 

r  \  r  t~  !  ' 

T  "  T'"'T* 

-aU*-  Tir:';  -•„■■  ..  Jy~r  ^ l— ■ 

>^yT\  P-  - v  ^ 
rki^  r  t  „»P  J-  Ts'i ».  It-,  ; 


Dear  Mr  Moriarty, 


dSlOrisan  (IB) 

MaxtJjnrab&vlKvctj  %Jnenmt, 

^oriiran, 

WM: 

Sunday  afternoon. 


I  did  not  get  your  telegram  last  night  until  after 
8  o'clock  at  night.  Atterbury  is  very  ill,  and  Mrs  Atterburf  sent  it 
on  by  post  to  me,  but  notwithstanding  it  did  not  arrive  here  until 
after  a  o'clock  I  understand.  I  intended  anyway  coming  up  to  town  to¬ 
day  to  forward  your  letters,  although  got  your  wire  at  home  from  Pari, 
I  an  sending  you  two  paokages  with  the  accumulation  of  letters 
that  have  ar rive d . s ince  I  posted  you  the  last  packqge  to  Nice  on 
Monday  last. 


Cain  got  notice  yesterday  from  the  Edison-Bell  Co:  when  he- was 
drawing  his  weeks  wages  that  his  services  would  be  dispensed  with  next 
week,  that  is  to  say  next  Saturday,  when  the  Edison-Bell  Co:  told  him 
they  were  to  close  up  the  house. 

I  was  telephoned  to  last  Wed: .  af  t  emoon  to  go  and  see  the  Board 
who  were  then  sitting.  Lord  Denbigh  asked  me  if  you  were  to  be  there, 
but  I  told  him  I  did  not  know  of  your  movements,  neither  did  I  as  I 
had  not  heard  from  you  since  the  previous  Monday  morning.  He  then 
enquired  when  the  order  was  sent  for  the  400  and  odd  machines  type  S  i 
to  be  shipped,  and  1  told  him  I  could  not  say  fran  memory.  I  knew  that  ' 
thxs  went  thro'  in  the  ordinal  and  proper  course,  and  they  asked  me  H 
to  inform  them.  L  then  got  the  infection  which  oo-inoided. with  what 
you  tcldthnn,  and  they  asked  me  if  I  had  any  word  of  their  being  shippl 
I  told  them  you  had  all  the  correspondence,  and  tint  I  did  not  know  ' 

— a8k9i„,to0::,i 

New  York  enquiring,  and  this  I  refused  to  do  as  I  toin  ♦ 

rr°-* -  »*««■  ♦. 1 
,«.  „.„.r  ,lthDat  „„t  0<rau^o„,  <lth 


a.  ■ 

After  this  the  interview  ended  and  I  withdrew.  I  have  not  had  an 
opportunity  of  before  oommuni eating  with  you  on  this  subject,  but  I 
will  leave  this  and  all  other  matters  until  you  return. 

Trusting  you  will  have  a  pleasant  Journey  back. 


Mr  Pease  called  here  the  other  day,  but  he  said  he  will  allow  till 
matter  to  stand  over  until  you  return,  when  he  requested  that  you  woul 


1899.  West  Orange  Laboratory  (D-99-20) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  the 
operation  of  the  West  Orange  laboratory.  Among  the  correspondents  are 
Edison,  Walter  S.  Mallory,  and  John  F.  Randolph.  Included  are  letters  from 
insurance  carriers,  items  pertaining  to  real  estate,  and  several  Edison 
memoranda  regarding  materials  ordered  for  the  laboratory. 

Approximately  50  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  The 
unselected  items  include  an  abstract  of  the  distribution  of  general  expenses  for 
the  year,  letters  pertaining  to  insurance  or  acknowledging  orders,  and  several 
personal  notes  to  Fred  C.  Devonald,  a  laboratory  employee. 


New  Jersey  and  Pennsylvania  Concentrating  Works. 


GENERAL  OFFICES: 
EDISON  LABORATOR 
ORANGE,  N.  J. 


Orange  Telephone,  ‘*311  Orange. 


E,  N.  J., 


cKw 

C^>V 

£JW  'ExtVwIj *■  y| 

i^-duju  |wV 

\Xj  S^aI^Ia^^Vw  :  —  /jjfr  (-/W-" 

CA5 VyJ^UTA^^-  "bp  1^,  XAsytgX  c?w 

C\a<  'Vevl--  3.  w-LJL  tefcc 


\^/Uw 


>0l^O 


^Ia&JLL, 


[ATTACHMENT] 


S-tfi 0- 


April  18,  1899. 


List  of  Key  Holders  to  Front  Sate  of  Laboratory. 

/William  35.  Gilmore.  /Alexander  Elliott,  Jr. 

/John  F.  Randolph.  /F."R.  Upton. 


[ATTACHMENT] 


Mr.  Walter  S.  Mallory, 

Ho .  8  Hawthorno  Avenue, 

Bast  Oraneo,  H.  J., 

Dear  Gir:- 

1  enclose  lease  to  J.  H.  Baldwin  of  premises 
corner  Valley  Street  and  Lakeside  Avenue,  West  Orange,  which  will  expire 
on  May  1st,  1900,  which!  have  assigned  to  you.  The  rent  has  been  paid 
to  December  1st,.  1800.  ’  .•/  ■ 

The  policy  of  fire  insurance  on  the  house  and  bam  Is  Ho .399, 432 
American  Insurance  Qompany  of  this  City  %for'  $2,200 .4$^  boo  Ton  'dwelling 
and  $200.  on  barn)  and . will .  expire  April  7,  1900'^^Premium -for  three 
years  from  April  7th,  1897,'  §13 .50,  and  ;f  er-unexpired^ierm, 'say  fottr 
months,  §1.50,  which  may  be  remitted  to  mo  as  suggested  by  you. 

If  the  title  to  the  property  has  changed,  please  advise  me  so  that 
proper  endorsement  nay  be  made  on  the  policy. 


D«0.  11th,  1899. 

Mr.  Randolph- 

X  herewith  enclose  carbon  copy  of  letter  to  Mr.  Baldwin,  which 
explains  Itself.  The  rent  le  at  the  rate  of  $300,00  per  year, 
payable  monthly  In  advance.  lease  runs  till  May  1st,  1900, 

Yours  very  truly. 


ff.S.  Mallory. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Dec.  11th,  1099. 

K r.  iT,  n.  Baldwin, 

West  Orange, 

K.  J. 

Dear  sir- 

The  property  which  you  hold  under  lease  fron  Samuel  W.  Baldwin, 
has  been  purchased  by  me.  Hr.  Baldwin  advises  me  that  you  huve  paid 
the  rent  to  Dec,  1st,  1899.  Please  hereafter  pay  the  rent  to  me. 


yours  very  truly. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Dec.  11th,  1899. 


Mr.  Randolph- 

The  attached  letter  to  Baldwin  explains  Itself.  Please  make  out 
Mr.  Edison's  check  for  $1,80,  ■which  forward  with  my  letter  herewith 
attached. 


/tel?  '  *■» 


Devonald- 

Ooramencing  Dec  .  26th,  if  any  of  the  draughtsmen  employed  by 
the  Cemeijt;  06.  are  late  to  exceed  5  minutes,  please  deduct  1-2 


X * 


KVa a  ci3JLv^v^- '  ■*- 
,  '  T  J^uxi 

"  <l  j6n^c  'jX  umv^  u/tfvk. 


DOCUMENT  FILE  SERIES 


1900 


1900.  Battery  (D-00-01) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  Edison's  primary  and 
storage  batteries.  Included  are  test  reports  on  the  Edison-Lalande  primary  battery  produced  by  the 
Edison  Manufacturing  Co. 


1900.  Edison,  T.A.  -  General  (D-00-02) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  relating  to  a  variety  of  subjects.  Included  are  documents 
that  deal  with  more  than  one  subject  or  that  do  not  fail  under  the  main  subject  categories  in  the 
Document  File.  Among  the  items  for  1900  are  letters  from  longtime  Edison  associates  Sigmund 
Bergmann,  Charles  Batchelor,  Samuel  Insull,  Edward  H.  Johnson,  and  Josiah  C.  Reiff,  as  well  as 
letters  of  inquiry  regarding  Louis  Dreyfus  and  his  process  for  welding  steel.  Also  included  is  a  letter 
containing  Edison's  comments  on  the  disposition  of  the  stock  in  the  Edison  Electric  Light  Co.  of 
Europe,  Ltd. 


1900.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Clubs  and  Societies  (D-00-03)  [not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  Edison’s  membership 
and  activities  in  clubs  and  professional  societies.  Among  the  items  for  1900  is  a  letter  concerning 
Edison's  support  of  the  Young  Men's  Christian  Association  of  the  Oranges. 

1900.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Employment  (D-00-04) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  from  or  about  employees  and  former  or  prospective 
employees.  Included  are  three  letters  by  Elbert  A.  Wilson,  a  chemist  whom  Edison  was  interested 
in  hiring,  and  a  letter  by  former  employee  Owen  J.  Conley. 

1900.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Family  (D-00-05) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  concerning  Edison's  family. 
Included  are  items  regarding  Thomas  A.  Edison,  Jr.'s  business  activities;  a  letter  by  William  Leslie 
Edison  complaining  about  the  behavior  of  his  sister-in-law,  Marie  Toohey  Edison;  a  notice  regarding 
the  death  of  Edison's  sister,  Marion  Wallace  Page;  and  letters  from  two  Edison  cousins  requesting 
financial  assistance.  There  is  also  a  draft  version  in  Edison's  hand  of  the  will  of  Mary  V.  Miller,  the 
mother  of  Mina  Miller  Edison. 

1900.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Financial  (D-00-06)  [not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  routine  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  Edison's 
personal  finances.  Included  are  items  pertaining  to  the  purchase  and  sale  of  bonds  and  routine 
letters  from  J.  P.  Morgan  &  Co.  concerning  payment  of  the  monthly  stipend  provided  by  Edison  to 
his  daughter,  Marion  Edison  Oeser. 

1900.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Name  Use  (D-00-07)  [not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  pertaining  to  the  use  of  Edison's 
name,  whether  authorized  or  unauthorized,  for  advertising  or  other  purposes.  Included  are  items 
concerning  the  use  of  Edison's  name,  picture,  and  signature  as  registered  trademarks  for  the  Edison 
companies.  Related  documents  can  be  found  in  the  Legal  Department  Records. 


1900.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Unsolicited  Correspondence 
(D-00-08)  [not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  unsolicited  letters  to  Edison  regarding  personal  and  business  matters. 
Included  are  requests  for  advice  on  technical  matters  and  requests  for  Edison's  assistance  in 
improving  or  promoting  inventions.  Other  items  concern  requests  for  Edison's  investment  in,  or 
contribution  to,  various  financial  ventures.  No  record  of  a  significant  response  by  Edison  has  been 
found  for  any  of  these  items. 

1900.  Edison  Manufacturing  Company  (D-00-09) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  the  business  of  the 
Edison  Manufacturing  Co.  Included  are  items  pertaining  to  the  incorporation  of  the  company  in  May 
1900.  There  are  also  letters  concerning  the  U.S.  War  Department's  purchase  of  phonoplex 
telegraphy  components  for  use  in  the  Philippine  Islands.  Among  the  correspondents  is  William  E. 
Gilmore,  vice  president  and  general  manager  of  the  company.  Other  items  in  the  Document  File 
relating  to  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Co.  can  be  found  in  D-00-01  (Battery)  and  in  D-00-15  (Motion 
Pictures). 


1900.  Edison-Saunders  Compressed  Air  Company  (D-00-10) 

[not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  pertaining  to  the  business  of  the 
Edison-Saunders  Compressed  Air  Co.  Included  are  routine  letters  regarding  foreign  patents. 

1900.  Electric  Light  (D-00-11)  [not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  electric  lighting  and 
power.  Included  are  routine  items  attesting  to  Edison's  continued  relations  with  the  General  Electric 
Co.,  the  Edison  Electric  Illuminating  Co.  of  New  York,  and  other  illuminating  companies.  There  are 
also  numerous  routine  letters  regarding  electric  meter  patents. 

1900.  Exhibitions  (D-00-12) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  concerning  industrial  and  electrical  expositions  in  Paris 
(1900)  and  in  Buffalo,  New  York  (1901). 

1900.  Mining  -  General  (D-00-13) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  mining  and  ore  milling. 
Included  are  letters  from  the  North  American  Transportation  &  Trading  Co.,  in  which  Edison  invested, 
and  an  accompanying  series  of  notes  by  Edison  regarding  gold  mining  in  Nome,  Alaska.  Also 
included  is  a  series  of  letters  and  reports  by  geologist  Martin  Schwerin,  who  was  hired  by  Edison  to 
prospect  for  ores  in  northern  Michigan. 

1900.  Mining  -  Ortiz  Mine  (D-00-14) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  Edison's  dry  placer 
process  for  the  extraction  of  gold  ore.  Most  of  the  items  are  letters  to  Edison  from  his  brother-in-law, 
John  V.  Miller,  and  from  Cloyd  M.  Chapman,  who  went  to  the  Ortiz  Mine  in  Dolores,  New  Mexico, 
to  prospect  and  to  supervise  the  construction  of  an  experimental  ore  processing  mill.  An  undated 
report,  probably  from  late  December,  gives  an  overview  of  activities  at  the  Ortiz  Mine  during  1900. 


1900.  Motion  Pictures  (D-00-15) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  the  commercial  and 
technical  development  of  motion  pictures.  Many  items  concern  the  Klondike  Exposition  Co.,  which 
was  organized  to  make  a  filming  expedition  to  the  Yukon  to  produce  films  suitable  for  display  at  the 
Paris  Exposition  of  1900.  Included  is  an  undated  memorandum  in  Edison’s  hand  regarding  the 
imperfect  quality  of  the  negatives  produced.  Other  documents  pertain  to  Edison's  suit  against  William 
N.  Selig  and  to  the  proposed  sale  of  Edison's  motion  picture  business  to  the  American  Mutoscope 
and  Biograph  Co.  Among  the  correspondents  are  William  E.  Gilmore,  vice  president  and  general 
manager  of  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Co.,  and  James  H.  White,  manager  of  the  Film  Department. 

1900.  Patents  (D-00-16) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  foreign  and  domestic 
patent  applications,  patent  litigation,  and  other  patent  matters.  Most  of  the  material  consists  of  letters 
to  Edison  from  the  law  firm  of  Dyer,  Edmonds  &  Dyer  pertaining  to  phonograph  patents  and  patent 
infringements. 


1900.  Phonograph  -  Edison  Phonograph  Works  (D-00-17) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  the  business  of  the 
Edison  Phonograph  Works.  Among  the  correspondents  are  the  Edison  United  Phonograph  Co 
Samuel  Insull,  and  his  brother  Martin  Insull. 

1900.  Phonograph  -  Edison  United 
Phonograph  Company  (D-00-18) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  the  business  of  the 
Edison  United  Phonograph  Co.  and  other  companies  organized  to  exploit  the  Edison  phonograph 
in  countries  other  than  the  United  States  and  Canada.  Included  are  items  concerning  the  financial 
problems  of  the  Edison  United  Phonograph  Co.  and  the  strained  relations  involving  the  Edison-Bell 
Consolidated  Phonograph  Co.,  Ltd.,  on  the  one  hand,  and  the  National  Phonograph  Co.  and  the 
Edison  Phonograph  Works,  on  the  other. 

1900.  Phonograph  -  Moriarty,  Stephen  F.  (D-00-19) 

[not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  personal  correspondence  and  bills  addressed  to  Stephen  F.  Moriartv 
vice  president  of  the  Edison  United  Phonograph  Co. 

1900.  West  Orange  Laboratory  (D-00-20)  [not  selected] 

This  folder  contains  memoranda,  correspondence,  and  other  documents  relating  to  the 
operation  of  the  West  Orange  laboratory. 


1900.  Battery  (D-00-01) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to 
Edison's  primary  and  storage  batteries.  Included  are  test  reports  on  the  Edison- 
Lalande  primary  battery  produced  by  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Co. 

Approximately  30  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  The 
following  items  have  not  been  selected:  solicited  and  unsolicited  data  regarding 
electric  vehicles,  including  a  copy  of  a  letter  from  Lord  Arthur  Balfour;  routine 
letters  concerning  battery  patents  or  publications  about  batteries;  and 
documents  that  duplicate  information  in  selected  material. 


Your  lcttor  of  Eon 6th,  from  Toledo,  asking  that  you  ho 

•  advised  as  to  the  result  of  tho  test  being  made  so  as  to  avoid  the  con¬ 
gealing  of  our  battery,  camo  duly  to  hand.  J.  sent  this  to  Mr,  Vose,  who 
is  following  up  those  tests,  and  1  bog  to  quote  you  a  memo,  that  ho  has 
sent  bank  in  answer  thereto: 

"An  extensive  series  of  tests  worn  made  under  Mr.  Edison's  direc¬ 
tions  on  artificially  freer, ing,  by  means  of  liquid  carbonic  acid, 
samples  of  solution  from  batteries  in  different  degrees  of  exhaustion 
and  prepared  with  different  densities  of  solution  containing 'from  IS 
to  35/i  of  soda.  With  tho  apparatus  used  a  temporaturo  of  40  E.  could 
be  obtained,  but  it  was  impracticable  to  maintain  it  for  a  long  time. 

In' these  tests  solutions  with  HO  to  35/S  of  soda  gave  results  very.  noarly 
alike,  standing  temperatures  of  30  E.  or  lower  without  freezing,  while 
solutions  below  20/T and  above  25$  were  more  easily  frozen. 

Those  testn,  however,  seem  of  little  use  as  they  do  not  at  all 
agree  with  the  results  found  in  practice  when  tho  batterioB  are  exposed 
to  the  cold  for  a  longer  time.  Thus  the  same  exhausted  batteries  from 
which  tho  samples  were  token  for  the  above  mentioned  tests  were  on  Jan. 
26th  put  out  doors,  since  which  timo  tho  lowest  observed  temperature 
has  been  about  10  E. ,  though  possibly  lower  during  some  nifjhts,  and  most 
of  the  timo  much  higher.  Three  days  later  those  with  solution  above 
30/3  were  about  full  of  slush,  the  25/5,  which  is  our  regular  solution, 

•  .had  a  little  slush,  and  those  between  25/,  tuid  30/'  had  intermediate  quan¬ 
tities  ,  varying  about  in  proportion  to  their  densities .  One  day  later 


thoso  with  2op  ancl  S4p  solutions  also  contained  some  slush,  end  it  hud 
increased  in  those  of  higher  densities.  Ho  solution  below  showed 
any,  and  since  that  time  there  lias  been  no  increased  freor.ing  of  any 
solutions. 

Hr.  Gladstone  lias  informed  mo  that  an  analysis  of  the  Gordon 
so-called  "Electro  Sodium1'  by  an  outside  chemist  showed  that  it  contained 
about  !5p  of  common  salt,  and  tests  by  Hr.  Edison's  chemists  have  shown 
about  the  some,  and  that  it  is  otherwise  practically  identical  with  our 
own  so-called  "Caustic  Potash". 

fflie  package^  of  soda  furnished  with  the  Gordon  batteries  are  such 
as  to  make  a  20p  solution,  while  we  furnish  enough  to  make  a  G5p  solu¬ 
tion,  though  recommending  in  our  catalogue  a  20,%  solution  for  use  in 
situations  where  closed  to  cold;  but  I  have  been  unable  to  learn  of  any 
cases  in  which  such  a  20p  solution  of  our  soda  has  been  lined  and  frosen 
in  practice. 

In  the  artificial  freezing  tests  previously  mentioned  a  ?,Op  solu¬ 
tion  of  our  soda  acted  almost  exactly  the  same  as  the  Gordon  solution, 
and  in  the  cells  put  out  doers  neither  the  Gordon  nor  our  own  2oP  solution 
has  yet  been  frosen  at  all. 

Preparations  have  been  made  under  hr.  Gladstone's  directions  for 
a  tost  at  the  ioe  factory  on  Lakeside  Jive.,  where  solutions  of  various  . 
donsities  and  also  with  the  addition  of  salt  will  be  tried  under  greater 
cold  than  will  probably  be  met  with  under  natural  conditions,  and  we 
are  now  awaiting  the  convenience  of  the  Ioe  Company  before  starting 
this  test."  » 

I  have  boon  hoping  to  get  at  Hr.  Edison  to  discuss  the  whole  of 
this  fully,  but,  as  you  have  doubtless  seen  by  the  paperB,  he  has  boon 
ill.  He  got  homo  Saturday  night,  but  is  under  the  doctor's  oaro,  and 
as  the  weather  here  yesterday  and  to-day  has  been  very  bad,  I  presume 
he  will  not  get  down  to  business;  in  fact,  he  may  stay  up  for  a  day  or 
two  longer. 

The  fact  that  both  chemists  found  upon  analysis  that  there  was5p  . 


Type  "Q" Cell,  ' ' 

■+,yrrr"r  <»)  • 

of  common  salt  in  the  potash  used  by  the  Gordon  people  is  quite  inter¬ 
esting,  and  I  •  think  that  what  wo  huvo  .cot  to  do  is  to  use  some  thing, 
similar  in  connection  with  our  potash,  I  think  this  will  obviate  the 
freezing.  As  you  know,  salt  3ms  been  used  in  street  railway  work, 
etc,,  for  a  groat  many  years  to  dissolve  snow  and  ice,  raid  I  presume 
that  it  has  certain  '-.utilities  in  it  that  will  be  useful  in  connection 
with  our  batteries.  However,  as  X  said  before,  I  am  going  to  take  this 
up  with  Hr,  Edison  at  the  quickest  possible  moment  and  we  will  doubtless 
reach  a  decision  soon.  In  the  meantime,  if  you  have  anything  to  sug¬ 
gest,  lot  me  know.  Of  course  as  fact  as  X  learn  anything  you  will  bo 
advised  cither  by  Hr.  Gladstone  or  myself. 

Tours  very  truly, 

General  Manager. 


toeg/iw 


fccJXsJ  c~«J  ^  p/T-t-ux 


Mr. f Gilmore: 

I^g  to  "give  you  report  of  the  comparative  test  c 
following  cells  July  10th: 

3  Edison-Lalande ,  type  "RR" ,  300  ampere  hours 

3  Gordon -Burnham,  300  ampere  hours 

3  Excelsior,  300  ampere  hours 

3  Eungesser,  600  ampere  hours. 

Type  "BR"  Edison-Lalande:  All  lasted  327  ampere  hours,  when  they 
exhausted  without  polarization  or  anything  unusual. 

Gordon-Bumham:  Two  polarized  between  6  P.  M.  (output  at  this 
time  245  ampere  hours)  and  7  A.  M.  the  following  day  (output  at  this 
time  271  ampere  hours).  The  voltage  of  the  third  cell  at  271  ampere 
hours  dropped  to  .10. 

Excelsior:  One  cell  polarized  at  311  ampere  hours;  one  polar¬ 

ized  at  271  ampere  hours  and  the  third  ran  to  331  ampere  hours,  at  which 
time  it  was  exhausted,  without  polarisation ,' but  the' voltage  dropped  to  0. 

Eungesser :  One  cell  short-circuited  between  the  zinc  and  oxide 

receptacle  at  178  ampere  hours.  The  other  two  polarized  at  311  ampere 
hours.  All  the  Eungesser  solutions  are  a  dirty  blue  or  yellow  color  p 
the  zincs  precipitate  to  the  bottom  of  the  cell. 

None  of  the  Edison-Lalande  cells  polarised;  on  the  contrary,  all 
of  the  other  makes  either  polarized  before  the  time  was  up  or  the 
voltage  dropped  suddenly,  with  the  single  exception  of  one  Excelsior 
cell,  which  lasted  eight  hours  longer  than  any  of  the  type  "HR"  Edison  - 
Lalande  cells  and  then  dropped  to  0. 

7/11/1900. 


[ATTACHMENT] 


REPORT  .  . 

.  •) 

32XPKRXCTTT:;  V/ITJ!  E])XSON-LALANPH  BATTERIES 
|  AT  LOW  TEMPERATURES . 

TJ2ST  2.  Mr  Brodie,  date  March  87th  to  April  7th-  59  cells  type 
t"  were  employed. 

The  conditions  were. varied  in  regard  to  make  of  soda,  density,  and 
glass  or  porcelain  jars. 

The  kind  of  soda:  Solway,  Alhotisen,  and  th.,t  employed  in  the  Gordon 

coll. 

The  percentage  of  soda  was  varied  from  lift  to  85J*  (densities) 

The  temperature  was  lowered  gradually  to  -80'  and  the, last  day 
reached  -88? 

j  in.  this  tost  the  soda  a  d  8#  soda  plus  salt  showed  the  best 

results;  greater  and  lesser  percentages  of  soda  froze  and  polarized  more 
rapidly.  The  kind  of  soda  used  made  very  little  difforence,and. while 
j  the  glass  jars  gnv  slightly  better  results  than  the  porcelain,'  still 
there  was  not  sufficient  difference  to  amount  to  anything. 

raST  2.  Mr  Brodie,  date  April  13th  to  April  88th. 

The  conditions  were  nearly  the  same  as  in  the  preceding'  test, the 
main  difference  being  in  dropping  the  temperature  to  -ir,'  4  -80 'early 
|  ln  thR  te8t*  Th«  Percentages  of  soda  varied  between  gQ/  and  with 

i  md  wlth0Ht  sa3t'  69  aenr>  w<;re  employed.  Glass  and  porcelain  jars 
were  used  with  the  some  results. 

|  The  sodft  1)3 atn  nf>  ™da  Plus  salt  again  showed  up  best, 

f  Mixtures  of  sodium  and  potassium  hydroxides  were  tried,  as  well  as 
||  plain  potassium  hydroxide  with  worse  results  than  soda  alone. 

I  TEST  3.  Mr  Morse,  date  Hay  4  to  May  10. 

In  this  test  74  cells  .type  «R-  were  used.  .They  were  made  up  as 


[ATTACHMENT] 


2 


fOl  3  0W8  J  - 

12  cells  20$  soda 
32  c  el  3  s  20$  soda  pi  us  sal  t 
32  calls  23,;  soda 
22  cells  2 Va  soda  plus  salt 
6  cells  25$  soda 
A  A  6  cells  23$  ooda 

4  (Jordon  cells  2C$  soda 

These  wore  divided  pretty  evenly  between  class  and  porcelain  Jars,  and 
some  wore  tried  without  oil.  There  was  no  marked  difference  betwe  n 
cells  containing  oil,' and  those  without. 

The  temperature  was  again  lowered  immediately  and  kept  around  -18" 
■  and,  though  thy  oil  polarised  with  very  few  exceptions,  still  20$  soda 
and  21#  ooda  plus  salt  showed  best  results. 


i 


TEST  4.  Mr  Morse  Date  May  17  to  May  29th. 

63  cells  were  employed.  The  object  of  the  frost  was  to  see  if  the  cells 
at  different  stages  of  their  lives  w-uld  act  differently,  hence- 

9  cells  with  0  ampere  hrs  taken  out  “ 

9  »  «  loo  11  »  «  ii 

9  "  '»  ISO  “  »  «  'I 

9  "  '•  200  •'  »  »  » 

9  '»  '*  250  '»  '»  "  « 

®  “  "  "  . and 

9  »  '•  500  «  '•  ••  I' 

were  used.  Of  the  nine  in  each  set,  3  contained  2C$  soda,  3-  20$  soda 
plus  salt  ,  and  3-  21$  soda  plus  salt.  As  in  the  case  of  the  first- 
test  the  temperature  was  lowered  gradually  from  0°  to  -23*  during  the 
testing  period.  The  results  Justified  the  expectation  that  those  used 
the  longest  would  be  the  firBt  to  polarize.  The  cells  containing  23$ 
soda  plus  salt  averaged  better  than  either  the  20$  soda  plus  salt  or  the 
20$  soda  alone. 


- sL-U  M  MARY.  3.  During  the  tests  some  cells  containing  hard 

pressed  copper  oxides,  and  some  with  soft  oxides,  as  well  as  the  loose 
oxide  used  by  the  (Jordon  people  were  compared  and  showed  no  marked  dif¬ 
ference  in  bhliavior. 


[ATTACHMENT] 


3* 

'  2l‘‘  Three  makes  of  soda,  vizt;-  'Solvay,  Alhusen  and  Gordon  soda  all 

giving  similar  results. 

3.  Porcelain  and  glass  jars,  with  a  slight  advantage  in  favor  of  the 
glass. 

4.  Oel*ls  with  oil,  and  no  oil.  No  difference. 

5.  Soda  and  potash  mixed  in  different  proportions , and  potash  separ¬ 
ately  showed  the  soda  alone  to  be  much  superior  over  potash,  either 
mixed  or  by  itself. 

.  6.  Difference  in  water-  on  account  of  the  hard  water  furnished  at 
the  King's  Go.  Refrigerating  Go.  and  which  precipi  3  A; i-1-  >.  ;:  ;it 

water  will  answer. 

. rk;C  Aunt  d.  1900 


TEST  5-  J.B.M.  Date  July  11  to  23  inclusive 

19  colls  type  "13"  were  employed-  contents  21$  soda  and  a  chemical 
salt,  and  79$  water,  this  proportion  having  given  the  best  results  upon 
previous  tests.  The  chemical  salt  was  0  4$  of  the  21$.  The  actual 

weights  used  in  each  were  6-1/2  ozs  of  water,  or  184-.graras 
48  grams  soda 
2  grains  chemical  salt 
Total  weight  -  184  grams 


The  chemical  salts  employed  were  sodium  phenol  ate  s:’"- 
"  acetate 

"  citrate 

"  oxalate  (which  precipitated) 

"  sulphate  .  ,  • 

.  bisulphate  Sod.  bisulphite 
11  nitrate 

"  nitrite 

"  phosphate 

"  pyrophosphate 

11  metaphosphate 

"  chlorate 

.  "  bromide 

"  silicate  (5  grams  of  a  soda  sol 

ution.  of  na  4  si  04) 


borate 


[ATTACHMENT] 


and  3  cell  a  containing  25)£  soda  plain.  object  of  tho  latter  being 
to  add  8 one  salt  as  soon  as  they  pol^irized,  and  soo  if  it  could  be  pre¬ 
vented:  an  objection  to  this  being  that  they  would  have  to  b  warned  up 
to  the  ordinary  temperature  or  the  sale  would*  jit  nix  with  the  solution- 
even  the  liquid,  as  wan  seen  in  the  sixth  test,  sodium  silicate  (syrupy) 
settled  upon  the  bottom  and  did  not  mix  with  the  solution  cold. 

These  .ceils  behaved  well,  and  gave  great  promise  of  an  ultimate  sol- 
ution  of  the  prpblem  / 

,  ;  fJodiura  phenol  ato 

•  /  «  acetate 

'  "  chlorate 

I  '-y  "  ..silicate 

/  1/ '  «  ..tartrate 

/,  11  ;  bromide. 

The  other^ precipitated,  chryatnllizert  and  polarised.  Curves  of  the  tem¬ 
perature  changes  lind  voltage  ch«) gen  accompany  this  report. 

T3SXT  6.  ;  J.B.M.  date  July  20  to  Augt  6  inclusive- 
31  cells  type,  "R"  were  used,  contents  21^  soda  plus  chemical, and  79# 
water, or  th  same  conditions  prevailed  as  in  Test  #4. 

Amounts,,  used  6  lbs  5  ox  water 
\  1  lb  10  ox  soda 

30  grains  chemical  salt 

Theoretical  weights  -  6  lbs  5  ox  3  groans  water 

1  lb  10  ox  soda 

■7  30.5  grams. 

The  cel 3 8  were  made  up  ns  follows;- 


i  4  cells  sodium  phono! ate 

s  4  "  "  acetate 

l  ,  5  »  »  silicate 

b  4  u  "  tartrate 

I  5  "  "  bromide 

i  5  "  "  chlorate 

2  "■  20%  soda  plain 
2  "  21#  soda  plain 

The  temperature  in  this  test  was  run- down  immediately, and  same  in  each 


wore  steady  and  never  gave  tho 
least  sign  of  polarization  . 


[ATTACHMENT! 


5  . 

The  21^  plain  went  out  Immediately.  A  set  of  curves  showing  the  aver¬ 
age  of  each  set  enclosed,  also  fin  average  temperature  curve.  The  box 
inwhidi  the  test  v/as  mails  varies  usually  7?  to  5  degrees  in  temperature 
between  tlje  ends  and  middle.  The  amonia  coil  runs  through  the  mjl&dle 
of  the  box 


letters  show  where 
thermomoteife  '  Were 
placed  < 

S  U  M  M  A  R  Y  .  In.  test  #5  with  the  "ri"  cells,  there  IS  but  one  sine 
plate,  and  after  the  test  the  oxide  platcjs  vfore  picked  with  a  knige 
and  showed  much  greater  reduction  to  metallic  copper  on  the  near  side 
(side  toward  the  zinc)  This  is  the  case  in  ordinary  use,  but,  if 
the  reduced  copper  occludes  or  absorbs  the  hydrogen  gas’  evolved,  it 
would  form  a  positive  membrane,  and  appose  the  cells*  action  oecasion- 
ing  polarization.  This  action,  if  a  fact, must  occur  more  easily  during 
reduction,  And  at  the  low’  temperature  employed,  when  it  is  naturally  to 
be  supposed  that  the  oxide  depolarizes  with  less  rapidity  and  efficiency 
An  example  tending  to  show  thisxis  found  in  the  3rd  test;  cells  'with 
300  and  275  amp  hrs  and  even  200  amp  hrs.  taken  out  of  them,  wore  used 
and  ran  the  length  of  their,  life. 

Now,  if  the  form  of  cell  "B"  has  any  value,  the  large  cell  of  "Y" 
type  300  amp  hrs.  may  answer  bettor  than  the  "R"  type-  an  explanation 
may  be  found  in  the  fact  that  there  is  a  larger  oxide  surface  whieh 
ordinarily  is  not  necessary,  but  in  the  low  temperature  tests  must  he 


[ATTACHMENT! 


taken  mo  account,  especially  if  tW  action  or  the  depolarizer  become 
sluggish  or  the  temperature  falls. 

The  use  of  foreign  salts  was  suggested  for  two  reasons.  1  The  salt 
would  increase  the  density  of  the  solution  without  increasing  the  per- 
contage  of  soda-  it  being  found  that  greater,  percentages  of  soda  than 
20  or  polarized  more  rapidly,  and  also  chrystallishd  more  quickly. 
Hence  to  prevent  freezing  and  crystallization  was  the  main  object  of  ' 
the  chemical.  53.  The  hydrogen  was  thought  to  be  soluble,  causing 
polarization.  It  is  know  that  100  volumes  of  urine  at  0*  to  -20° 

' 3  '  1  ’ '  i"'y oi  hy<,r°6*n.'  The  dissolving  power  of  caustic 
soda  is  not  known*  but  if  it  is  a  solvent  for  hydrogen  it  was  hoped 
that  the  introduction  of  sodium  phenolate,  chlorate,  etc  would  render  1 
it  loss  so. 

The  trouble  there  is  due  to  an  inefficient  depolarizer  at  the 
temperature  required.  The  hydrogen  ma*  dissolve  in  the  solution  but 
it  must  necessarily  stay  around  the  copper  oxide  being  positive  and 
due  to  the  fact  that  a  current  is  passing  through  the  cell  in  that  dir- 
'  action  whether  the. cell  is  polarized  or  not.  If  then,  the  hydrogen 
does  not  fill  the  pores  of  the  reduced  copper  and  is  not  occluded  it 
must  form  a  film  around  the  outside  of  the.  oxide  pole  at  all  events. 
SWrfiJlCTIOJrs-  It  would  be  interesting  to  try  cells,  also  a  larger 
percentage  of  sodium  silicate  or  chlorate,  preferably  the  former,  as 
U  can't  crystallize  out-  while  it  might  increase  local  action  internal 
resistonc  ,  and  lower  the  life  of  the  cell  still  it  would  keep  the 
hydrogen  right  where  it  .was  liberated,  at  the  oxide  plate,  and  if.  the 
depolarizer  will  act,  present  the, best-  conditions  for  such  action. 

I  don't  know  that  it  will  increase  l ocal  action, Na  4  Si04  is  not  a 
solvent  for  zinc.  It  doen't  increase  the  internal  resistance  in  the 
amount  heretoforo 


[ATTACHMENT! 


I  '  ’  . 

|  '  7 

| 

j  l  course  the  "Y"  typo  /ou3tl  increase  internal  resistance  frowtho 
t  orn  of  cell. 


CABLE  ADDRESS: 


D.-YAN  NOSTRAND  COMPANY,  “KS 
Publishers,!  1  mfiorfers  ♦  and  t  Booksellers, 

23  Murray  and  27  Warren  Streets, 

P.  0.  Box  1741.  NEW  YORK,  Becember  5,  1900. 


T.  A.  Edison,  Esq., 

Orange,  N.  J. 

Bear  Sir: 

With  regard  to  Thomsen's  " Thermo chemische  Untersuchungon? 
as  stated  to  you  originally,  this  was  not  obtainable  here  and 
I  ordered  a  copy  for  you  from  abroad,  which  is  due  in  about, ten 
days'  time.  The  other  work,  Gladstone  and  Tribe's  "Storage  Bat¬ 
teries,"  is  out  of  print  and  quite  scarce,  but  I  hope  to  have  this 
for  you  at  the  same  time.  (>  y 

The  volumes  of  the  American^.  Chomiwal  Society  for  which 
you  sent  me  the  order  this  morning  must  be  imported  as  they  are 
not  obtainable  here  and  it  will  be  at  least  three  or  four  weeks 
before  I  am  able  to  send  them  to  you. 

Awaiting  your  further  favors,  I  am 


CABLE  ADDRESS: 


D.  VAN  N03TRAND  COMPANY,  ,*£ 


]f  ulalisl^e 


Irrjpopfeps  •  en^el  •  lB@0l5selle.ps, 

trray  27  Warren.  Streets, 


P.O.Box  1741.  New  YORK, 


December  12,  1900. 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq. , 

Orange,  N.  J. 

Dear  Sir: 

Replying  to  your  recent  inquiry,  we  beg  to  say  that  we 
shall  be  pleased  to  supply  you  with  a  copy  of  Jensch's  "Das  Cad¬ 
mium"  (a  paper  contained  in  ''Safimlung  Ohemischer  und  Chemischfcitech 
nischer  Vortrftge)  at  50  cts.,  and  awaiting  your  favors,  are 
Very  truly  yours,  j. 


1900.  Edison,  T.A.  -  General  (D-00-02) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  relating  to  a  variety  of  subjects. 
Included  are  documents  that  deal  with  more  than  one  subject  or  that  do  not 
fall  under  the  main  subject  categories  in  the  Document  File.  Among  the  items 
for  1900  are  letters  from  longtime  Edison  associates  Sigmund  Bergmann, 
Charles  Batchelor,  Samuel  Insull,  Edward  H.  Johnson,  and  Josiah  C.  Reiff, 
as  well  as  letters  of  inquiry  regarding  Louis  Dreyfus  and  his  process  for 
welding  steel.  Also  included  is  a  letter  containing  Edison's  comments  on  the 
disposition  of  the  stock  in  the  Edison  Electric  Light  Co.  of  Europe,  Ltd. 

All  of  the  documents  have  been  selected. 


Bdrgmann-Elek  ' motoren -  und  Dvyiamo -Werke 

Y"r  1  ktiengesellschaft.  \  ?  , 


- :  .  -  BERLIN  N. February  10, . iiOO.. . 

Telegramn-Adresse.-Fulgurn  Berlin.  Oudemrder  Slrasseay#  -  *  V ' 

-  yDV;.;'.  V.  ^  na*‘  *'■■*»*>?>»■  '  .  v  .0  J  '>%£■ 

:  Amt  II,  No.  2652  ,ind  £666.  ' 


*“>  :  ■  ,0  '  dttOJ-'f' 

My  dear  Mi  eon  ,  ^  ^  / 

Your  .letter  1  have  re'c  give  dt  many /thanks  for  it 
I  am  very  much  pleased  to  hear  that  fortune  tot  11  smile  upon 
you'  aga in  and  I  hope  that  this  sunshine,  which  you  are  so  much  entitle 0 


'*  The.  Ore" Mt  11  trig: Patents  .are'  making  their  uei 
and  Seub'el  will-  send  jor  you  and  Dick  a  full  report  < 


I  have  sent  you  under  separate  covi 
,  English  Edition  of  our, new  Catalogue ,  All  \ 
notsonly.  exist -  on  paper  out  -J.  am  J nanufaciur : 


catalogue  then  you  will: come 


1  the  ..gone  lust  on  that  I  have  ? 


nave  accomplished  in  so  short  a  ftiiie . 


f  idea  of  .  *■  he-  impf.o  vgm  ents  fbe 


j  Motor  and  Dynamo  i 


felt)  days  as  a  present,  with  my  compliments ,  a  two  : 
motor  slow  speed  (150  Revolutions  pih. Min.)  6.tc.rt  in > 


fiergmann-Elektromc*ogen-  nnd  Dynamo  -  Werh^  Aktiengesellschaft. 


VH 


Febry.10.  1900 


no  sparking  and  no  change  in  the  position  of  brushes  from  no  load  to 
full  load.  You  will  find  this  motor  described  in  the  catalogue  on  ; 

page  62  to  71  .  [ 

The  magnetframe  of  this  machine  is  all  made  up  of  punchings 
and  X  am  also  sending  you  such  a  punching  also  one  of  the  armature, on 
whtch  you  wtll  find  entirely  new  features,  of  which  I  enclose  a  des¬ 
cription. 

Would  you  please,  after  having  received  this  motor,  to  write 
me  a  letter  in  your  own  handwriting  written  with  ink  giving  your  opinion 
on  the  design  as  well  as  the  workmanship  of  this  motor  as  well  as  on  the 
other  types  in  the  catalogue . 

A  letter  like  this  from  you,  would  be  a  fine  send  off  for  my  \$ 
new  Catalogue  and  pricelist  which  I  am  Just  now  preparing.  Wtll  you  do 
this  for  me  ? 

Ina  separate ■_  letter  I  would  like  to  know,  how  far  you  are  with 
X  have  not  toed  that  your  American  Patent  is  issued  and 
If  the  Meter  is  a 

success  I  could  sell  the  Patent  for  you  in  this  country  at  a  good  price 
without  any  trouble. 

'i'\  Moping  that  you  and  your  family  are  enyoytng  good  health  I 

with  kindest  regards 

Your  old  and  faithful  friend 


your  new  meter. 

_ 

I  hope  ■  not  neglected  to  have  it  patented  in  Germany. 


J  tl 


7 


[ENCLOSURE] 

Bergmann-Elektromotoren-  mid  Dynamo  -  Werjta .  Aktiengesellschaft. 

_ _  _<r  ’-s  : 

('  f  _  ^  " 

Re.  Type  F  Machine. 

Armature . 

Z7ze  principal  features  of  this  armature  are  firstly  the 
curved  slot  and  secondly  the  split  or  slotted  tooth.  The  armature  is 
adapted  to  machine  formed  coils  and  the  curvature  of  the  slot  permits 
of  the  coil  being  placed  in.  position  very  easely  and  without  straining 
it.  Fig.l  shows  the  usual  form  of  slot  and  the  placing  of  a  coil  on 
the  armature.  Fig. 8  shows  the  same  conditions  but  with  the  curved 
slot.  The  curved  slot  also  permits  of  much  more  wire  being  placed  in 
the  armature  than  with  the  straight  slot,  the  comparison  being  based 
on  the  conditions  that  the  outside  diameter  of  armature  the  inside  dia¬ 
meter  of  armature,  the  diameter  of  bottom  of  slots,  and  the  width  of 
tooth  at  bottom  of  slot  are  equal  in  both  armatures,  these  being  limit¬ 
ing  conditions. 

The  sparktngjusually  present  in  toothed  armatures  when  worked 
-to  high  outputs  per  pound  of  material  has  been  abvtated  by  the  splitting 
of  the  tooth *  This  sparking  which  is  so  much  more  noticable  in  toothed 
armatures  than  in  smooth  body  armatures  is  due  to  the  self  induction 
of  the  coil  that  is  passing  under  the  brush  and  having  the  direction 
of  current  reversed  tn  it.  The  coil  in  the  toothed  armature  being  al¬ 
most  surrounded  by  iron  has  a  much  higher  self  induction.  In  splitting 
the  tooth  and  forming  a  reluctance  gaf  below  the  tooth  a  large  amount 


[ENCLOSURE] 


£er gin  ann- Elektromotcv-en- 
_ _  % _ 


und  Dynamo-  Wei^  >  Aktiengesellschaft. 

- 


of  magnetism  is  forced  through  the  teeth  adjacent  to  the  ootl  to  be 
commutated,  up  one  side  of  it  and  down  the  other,  thus  magnetically 
saturation  the  teeth  in  the  commutation  zone  and  thereby  reducing  the 
eelf  induction.  A  machine  properly  proportioned  on  these  lines  needs 
no  movement  of  the  brushes  and  can  carry  double  load  for  short  periods. 

The  main  feature  of  the  field  is  the  removable  pole  extent  ion 
and  the  fact  that  it  ts  laminated  throughout  (the  laminated  field  is 
of  course  old.) 


[ENCLOSURE] 

~  FEBRTJA-RY^  23,  1900... 

NTG  NEW^'~'WRDyESDAY, 

.  GOURAUDPHQNE.”  « 

CoL  Gouraud  Discovers  an  "  English  E 
7  Edison”  and  a  New  Machine.  g 


TA£'  fr/euds 
EloctrJclight.  Engineers. 


_ 


IMIUONETTE*.  LONDON. 


J?  <&< 


/fry-zryiZ  y^^-^-ZitL^r  ■c~-S 

•^■*5*-'*"*-<-'<^  ^»**t, 

jy  -  />%:*  x^- 

^Z^/>i~-7  /%a/  Sl?C'  <Z^C7  v-c-O^e^- 

<££c  73.  *<,«  *c/> 

^  ^-^o<-*-«  -  t..^-<*-^<.  ^  ^r2^-  -^i*. 

«**»  '^r~  i 

<zz^*y  <%L  /'l?t^0<~x~~ 

=.  ^y  7  ^yC^Ji^r  <Zr  \ 
*7  -  ^  /-  ^ 

^ vw . 

^^r«™  -Z*Zy 

<z%sn  ^  pyxx-^y 

7"  ySSZ^LA  c^u, 

yt&a-izy!  f-~  <£**<7  df- 

6^<?pCi7r  ^C^>^6c.  — 


s/~S7~£^  C^C^A  ^S^L-cy^-t-A  Af^^Z-C-^C^, 

,  ^  r  *2£l 

<EZ^f .  &>  ^<-c  <^4 

^<-0-7  dt  -.-  </^ 

4-^5*-  ^ 

/^Lc* ZLjl.  £%&-c*.-c-<^£-*>C^>  V<^C 

<^r-y>-*~.  *Sl-ACc^»—*C  «*5^  ^£^7"  , 

^  l->^ — ^  j'~  B- 

yy%y  y^ . 

\  <yzA^~^-^  -  ^t^z- 

<&£r^  (?’*—'  >S-^rJ 

Ag*~*  J2  Si'  '  ^ 

y^cJL  ^AecyC 

-^»  0-^-* \^c~ j>L~%.  /j 

2%<-e,  *Z&t6  -  ^  g-  -220-  %t^(- 

A^  c.  -  7%Zsr-f -  /^7 

A£*^  *g*^  /£l  %gtZ^£Os 

<sZA*-*-A  *X  a-  .jSsw!.  ^4,  ,ZZcZT 


/C'A***-*- 

•^C/^>t^r  /Qro'  . 

-  ^#'>CSr  e--=»  4ft^-C^' 

z4&£^,  SE^- 

<:^'  ^^<--~*^L-i*-^-e~  — ■  {^/&iZ. — -^''^^w  <-7/&-z~^pX_^tr  —tz&^yr 

<?i_r  <S2t*&£.  **^ur  e&^ts 

^7  <W  S^i?£jX—r^y. -_  «t_<^c-c^' 

^^V-2-<— y  £*'-*+-*— *  *^~ — -w  */^ 

&C<*^  t?ZC£  *££+,  ^f^f’  '6*' 


/^t-«-T,  «-<-  7Sg-^»  -f  ^-| - fT  f.  r^2^-  . 

£r  cz^  <*& 

,  ,  <^_ — ,  ST  ^  te^syz^^tzC^u, 


<!%*-CC£-  <&-f 


/Crr?*-*~L— 

^  <^Z^>ZZC  2£<r 


j£?  6>^<- 

— r  . 

^C^t—  Ot^C- 

t&t'L 

^^^«_-^_-*>  «_*~r  ^ 

j  5^-  2^-'  ^ *g  (^c^^ls£^ 


C  -  <Z&*7C-£_ 

2#~ 

/fo.  <y<rc/  r  d&L*-,  -<^- 

Vera  /ZZ€Srr-r+,  /? 

<Zp'-£<S  2|^,  /” i c 

ZZ£L<~  0^  ^4. 

&^C^/C  f  ^^^9  yy*2^2*~y~  <?£--*? 

*zz*i*-£  yz^x-^cs 

^£z*~y  '  ^ 

y  * 

^C~t* 

s^zy* -y,  yZ&  _ 

!  <s*-'y  '!^e-^c  —  ^ \%Zis^yyyZ^^£.  yy' 

y^?  —  *pt''  sCy>t^r 

S£<-  xJ^  •  ^ZyC^Z> L-*-t-«-^_x*_^  Z&~ 

x^ty  oc-^cxx  X —  cx-*y-~<y  ei**e^&>S  0^  <^Cx»,  s^Zzy^ 

^i-^ect-^  —  *^v — --s^'  ^’•*^v, 

-u- 

*£^y(  -  y£*-,  y*-cyzc? 

A**"  &ZC^  <i'— 

£2^f-&z^c-  yyzty^^,  ^  y£*^~L.  %>c^dts£) 


tft WJ  l 


T(\flinctt  to 


I  '  "Wit  clourvt  im.c»aXs,I 

I  *  ••«»  . 

!  /he.ve*%~fociA~fa  cU.c^T' «ic»-ct — 

!.~  a  -J i-a-—- 

cA«^Y^Ui 


'YiVut  /&<ft 


K^Crf  a. 

.//./;— rl'2jp  - 


'•w^  * 


X i 
0  Ho  tYlo-se^s 


I  should  add  that  he  intends 


go 


r  and 


it  the:  matter  in 


&£(?) 


Some  time  ago,  in  company  with  Mr,  Lage,  of  Rio  Janie ro, 


you  showed  me  a  coal  hurning  scheme  and  suggested  that  later  on, 
when  your  device  was  ready  for  the  market  and  proper  patents  were 
secured,  you  would  advise  me,  in  order  that  I  might  take  the  ms. t ter 
up  with  Mr.  lage. 

Having  this  in  mind,  I  have  talked  withlpne  or  two  people  about  • 
it,  and  have  learned  that  there  are  some  old  patents  on  devices  of 
this  character,  and  it  occurred  to  me  that  it  would  he  of  interest 
to  you  to  know  of  these  patents,  I  know  that  your  attorneys  might 
find  them,  hut  on  the  other  hand,  they  might  not.  1  learn  that  the 
following  patents  have  heen  taken  out: 

405,966,  on  June  25,  1889,  405,967,  on  June  25,  1889. 

438,872,  on  October  21,  1890.  . 

These  belong  to  a  man  by  the  name  of  John  Wilson,  who  is  very 
poor,  and  if  they  are  of  ary  value ,  they  could  be  secured  at  a  very 
low  price,  If  you  should  want  them,  please  let  me  know,  suggesting 
what  they  are  worth  to  you  and  I  think  I  can  get  them;  if  they  are 
of  no  value,  also  please  let  me  know  and  1  will  dispose  of  Mr. 


Wilson. 


bhb/cb 


J.  C.  RETFF,  /  ....  ,  ..  r?  -A 

20  Broad  Street.  /j  /  's  -* fT'  Aa  *rW  l^^tx  j 

(*£.  4j.<fe;5, 

Is  tjs^  ^  New  York TorTP 

.  cw--* 

*X  4?^m 

^4  7<W  / 

✓  ‘  ✓ _ /  _  /  y  y - ..  "  'AfAjfi’l  *1  ‘ 

iyCd)  A^.  *SC 

€Z-z>  /yVC/  ^ 

ACe.  S^At^xAsGZ-^)  / <5^ O’.  O  c>0 

v4*Ce-_v_  ^vce  lc  /^  /s~- s^k^S^,  <s. 

>v^  f  ,,  >C<S^ 

tC^  <^-c£i_S  'A\)^Je/i> 

^  <£>i  /A^Ar^f(  f 'y-e 

y  /IAT  ^  c^4 

^  ffr  70  A  >7"  ^5W< 

J,/f  *7^cS 

<AAri^  tf 

*2^'  c5^ yt'-cr^y, 

<nu-.:  ^  ysAi  sfepY 

^4^  f  <4  cC-^=C^tz^ 

^AA^<_sAs  t-^~  CSI/&1  'f-xY^ (Yc*sl  <=*2-o*__-e~-^e^_^r 

Y  ,  ’“^'*'2-4^  ^2-^z^>e_7 

^c^C^sz^,  .  f — b^-  tzz-ea u^  ^cV^/S,t^h<^ 

At^o^  ^4^oe-  .*■'  //y~Y^x^-^s;/'r  .,  y  ii>-. 


[ATTACHMENT] 


Wo  note  in  tho  Nov/  York  "Herald"  of  the  Oth  instant  an  article 
•awarding  the  fusion  of  stool  by  being  placed  in  some  chemical  compound 
ogother  with  powdorecl  aluminum  and  ignitod.  ..  Thio  may  be  the'  usual 
towspaner  fake  story,  but  if  not,  will  you  kindly  give  us  the  address  of 
!r.  Louis  Dreyfus,  the  alleged  inventor.,  or  if  there  is  no  secret  about 
he  process,  give  us  tho  proportions  of  the  1®  chanical  or  chemical 
lixture  referred  to? 

Kindly  note  enclosed  stamped  and  addressed  envelope.  Wo  have  taken 
he  liberty  0f  calling  upon  your  good  services  on  the  ground,  that  we  are 
sing  n  groat  many  of  tho  Edison  batteries  and  appliances.  Thanking  you 
n  advance  for  your  courtesy,  we  are, 


Yours  very  truly, 


[ENCLOSURE] 


IEW  YORK.  _ApxlI_JJf_I9.0Q._ 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 

Orange,  New  Jersey. 

Dear  Sir:- 

Mr.  Louis  Dreyfus,  before  his  departure  for  Europe  last 
week,  requested  that  1  would  write  you,  notifying  you  that  1  have 
charge  of  his  interests  in  this  country  and  have  in  hand  the  matter 
of  his  flexible  metallic  tubes,  as  well  as  the  Goldschmidt  process 
for  welding  rails. 

If  there  is  anything  1  can  do  for  you  in  connection  with 
either  of  these  matters,  1  shall  be  only  too  glad  to  do  it. 


Yours  very  truly, 


4$# 

~^)//r/;Y//  ^/yy;/s//  -  /A/yyy/  ■  ^)r//r;: 

■  /w//.  ;i?vwk  ^y/</r 


A'h4ZZ?C74ZC  “  '  A$jrrr/ /////.  ,  *1  S  //M& 

^hiAs,  X<4rf,  CL  ■  'ZcCmutk* 

ALccvj  .dstAs* :  - 

^  c4r>-uC  444,0^^.  -Au^eC,  -a,  -1t£ujC  A^u~, 
"5  ^  *f  6  ^  CA^u^  i&trllc*-  ;  <J4  9rtLA^.  Or<^ 
.AsL^t/U^//-  J/L^/f*  T^Ac*. 


vCtsUAX, 

OrChAyJ^  ,[J'Ci^uL  ^  ^  >Cd~  Uy*ua^ 

^  ^  TAuX,  U*Ak  /^cU^4^ 

ffrC  4wA&\s  -Lr>r  /  7?  '*  7  _ 

ort&  _Xu*_  ^  W-Tf  | 

•  '**4''  r*c~  -^4  77^  44^J^j4£,  ^<0-^4 


■.dn/dd/edame/drMmcrfc$tf//S'id%rc/t).  ^ 

— -  _ ,/. 

'bd/frj  si*)  AjaJ  ofauAJ  J^'Jjt^s v^U^U  O 

tr^-^U'C  ^tr^C,^  qJL^C^  Q~rt~  -a^c,  '&£ti^' 
Cel  ?  vu~*C  U/  cfauAj^  a^i  d^ 
/"  ^Lx  (frd!!^(l Or<-  r0 


OVC 


[ATTACHMENT] 


1  '  U  ’  -s, 


p,tf  CL,.  dJtXxt-  V^-'V,<.^,/  tf-jj 
^  \  /  yfi 

l/O-c JlZ- 

■L^SD 


C( — <=&~ 


L^A/V_> 


u  ■  -....iejcr*f  ^ 

Zj£-±  &l»~?  i 


4  1^-  vwi^i  ^  /^/jgdr^tz?)  kusyinsf  Idtiy 

'  nf°  ^  ^  ^ 7 

j,|%rt«M  m  <?cl*m,  ^  %S3L^° r°^rh^v  ^ 

p>  <lu  tucjojid  i\  /tfuuaA  esrfqJU,  e^<uz/7dsAjsfx»  ,  d  cun 

CLdofasd.  iLl!' rtwt  w  tu>  tMjrrfurd  fki.  MAjajn^Ki l/y  duo  %mife?e 

iwfUL'lh.  (cal' dhdd.  w  dfcxcjt.  haJIhao  uye  AjuUcjia  — -  <lu  tied'  (?qas  m  aJuruJd 

fa  t  Cfux  LUvm  /Uoasu  -fiv  CtfiMy  LU  ,  odltM  ifa-  Gourde,  If  7?&y  aMrw- 

Ud,  fait  afifuiMj-  olturfs  — •  fVt  kcnx  uo  fitcuum  lb.  Qoua/' utu/aC  j 

ajjlmd  6-fkjiA.  MtettJiYS1  m  owijrJlafUL  tied-  umdcl  fa  cudntjtnadft.  A  /&  'lm&vmJZ  ! 
(rf-Th.  erUa/j:i  Sutux  (rJUn  Qannot  (Lt  JLuai  -t^oJ'iiusxU  ajLlufad-  Acoze  utAmu  Lot 
UMjfar  cLwajl  (_jvv  inJcLniu.lki.  dwuneos  Cmn'yikuod'LX^ 

■J'jtUmoiLf  Acnn  ovc  AioaM  tk  Mm.cJ'U  Q, o  uxctM  iod'  unefa  a^ty  i-vudLo  coud  | 

HA^dtA  til  h/iu  OK  OM  ewLj  Qalltd.  ujim  £  cU  tfiAaS  eruA  ettt  -  j 

tdtZo  —  'M.aot  fa  wXlMtim  6^  tdJCfan.^  CLnnj  A&onUnWOjtn<  -  | 

jrt  mvttoa  klL  eafafeT oMbucjL  7 id  <&«uaJs  oJLm  'tfk  u. <,  y  Skew,  jeth 

QJ1  G. Iomj  tkcj- -rbu>  ujcu>  I^imA  eXedttiMinJ-  <Xo  exit  Cu>  hdP  Juou£fs _  \Jjt- 

frfktA  (AXtuMe  «w  ,  y  Oewuu  ikiuj  LanruSd  JU  jluJ- uncLw  Svuclo 

and  uaZuAcdty  Urmdd  vocfaZT  Ttwt/c  /UtjU*'  in  ~th.  uxcdtCL  ,  UuHsao  /96y 

d&jijlMed.  U  fat  ao  c faiA  ^u-urfo  fa  its.  dj.^juxM.d.  O*  to*  uhajb  _  t$co  CUuohcP 

1 0  ficuA  lb  (Iiuowa/-  ux  forfait  £iuor&  lao  tm 

J'flUoe  (U&h  tfas.  dfccotMerfs'  '^jsxm\  ~f~^buiuA^&  ~f  ■  $  Ua*cLw &tcvt\d  /^&y  loutQ 
faeuot  its.  faiuruttiA  ,  fydlfaitTLi.  uofcvaaj'i  and  etcoJ-WUJ  ikc^uncta  Coo  lot 
ukaii  duittf-j  Am  C.ka\.cfe  hm(j  ^  jm^Kroo  Owd  faAOnnun*  On d-0- 

6vi  Ct$S(rfim>  ,  '^Cy  Oatunneny  Lu  HmJ<  CU  t tefOAdo  ~rfa  &KeeutVrslu^>,  - _ -L 

dieut  tkusfox.  imAMn  cmM  flunk  a  ktJSc  Q*>  d  Afadr  fa  truai/'lc  emit#’ 


:  2. 

il  th.  J&nMjJTio  dujuiot  4/  cu>  &, teeu/n's  —  /hko 

t,  He  t/Ae/ku  (THajuJs  ifeuA  1mmx>  ;  U~t cUe*  W"wa.W  «^ty  cd&iaZtinto 

ifvu  uotaI  y  hCuavi  U'  ~t~hu  —  kluM  we  kcuK  one  thuf  <*  (ioctcMa&f?y\J 
^CuU^AM.  f  u*  lunAl  imcJ(j.  a  Hrnaked  <$xj-f  "t  a&ud  lf*yru>  t" 

MUmm  Cuuibw  tlw  jdecua-c  adtcbiur>o  tf-ty  itiAMLd  Sd/ajJ  1 Lvh 
UnM.  le  p  ui  OAcLecL  T^Vtu  ;  v^e^ylse/  lfc~i*4.  e\Zt~o^~tsiuu  p'lrm  UAct^j  la^~ 
ffk^v  jimji  tewm- 

^QAepAuLf  if  (AAA* 

Cda^eJtfl/ 

&hee0rfk 


[ENCLOSURE] 


I  ib  Ajnur&bt/fr^ 

r'-Q(CiUf&*u.tiiA.  , 

%  luoiMd,  if  rv\  iujuM-di  /kcfj&ou^  $mdo  t  ~ 

^If.oo  6  h.fla&t^e.  fCy  Gaam  luh.  j- ,  0  ,  J  i  SsJ'.  CU^uat  ltd'*'  ^2.6  — 

jl °'00b  V  "  JcM-rjuAf  "  "  <t- oo 

Iff o o o  kUf/TKxf  fanuurd  6ji  »  -fit.-tOutf,  ■*  "  y^D 

h'Dob  8utJ<nei(li±  cft«t  5$  ,  -  .  £5-0 

(jL,  imM  k'tumciied  L  titytu'  ?&e/ loL* idd afie/)  IctfHtttoJ't/fi 
^  $Mi)  ^jQuaJ  $~tLo  &(o  ■  ff'S' 

-.JCtom  uWnf-  ih  iufca*  cm  &-mcL>  -jtfniA.  f  U^jl  cuA/~ 
jjda.n  d~t  ffuA  OMdU' - - t^Lh<  ~tkji  JLotsw/)  fkuo  aotu^tdcc£k<7 

J6ud  a  (dueJe  Mel  mcm/t  jtrr  'l8o,a.aJjid  du.  ,  Lf  iaacoJ  fc  flctuJ 
/’  ,  <?«*  {  ^  Lec^choa^QAol^^O'&  ,  S*>* 

Q.  f  kw>fyiAl(  luctcd  -^UAftiiA,  UfAuiSTim^  (juo. 

Gkt  OtdtA  im  iwUu^  YU cfutd  CiAsy~tujQ  cl  uuo  /dux. tt  it  uAcidtJ' 

fctAAoJ(l  CUv^  oAetu^f  vdla/evet,  tu  4  oivi&i/nMz^u/ /  cry  im  ih.  Uaummma' 

■  {pc  CotM  ffUAZt  djj  ffc&.  (XxtfdxxKAMAA.ciAAdf  GY  fa  CmJtdAa*  ~dr  OLqoriMZt^alfJr^C^ _ 

Im  Ccuie  4  th.  (Xicdk  6^  ovu>  (cv  uaovq  d^ih.  e^n&uTc/vP ,  cnd&/s  dcc/wd. 
ij/U  IuAajUm  07  u^'iwjV  fikaM  it  4ufltid*J'  tTTuaJd  cocof 
OkaMCjQ.  or^dteMOi,  cu-fitu  iMxye<JuAj^Jy  w  MdkpTULas^eM  m 
®j  ddbxJuuuMMAV)  (r/irunfi  ckcuxu  ifa  Oje  GZfrjtffc,  - 

AAftAjLci  .  y  G.  f,  )  c-^/aet.ccM<r  y  /A i 

$  $  (  J&fatriy 


[ON  BACK  OF  PRECEDING  PAGE] 


W, 

, /^uy/^y^^y^yj  s^yy^ 

'^-ex*/\~  /  'i&~~y  *—r~z  z-*^s  'srt< 


/fi^-^^~~~?iA^sz----^yjL<  -zY-zs^-^  tp^^—Z-^  c-z-ez a-<jR 

'^-ex*/\~  /  y‘S~~jr  e~-r~z  ^^yy^ 

'  y~  f&lxLay?  '2^^-c-~<—-^p 

’~&^-<_^Ly^  yy<^^ 


^V  -~-~J  ^~v 


n  ,  ■  «a»  ^Yd^y^-^YX^  >*  - -  I 

y c^z  "Tn^y^a^J  yy-^^  ^  oy~  yy^. yy^. 

/0-€^  Y^ 


calc  its.  There  was  a  beautiful  specimen  at  the  White  House,  in 
•the  room  in  which  I  washed  my  hands  Wednesday  evening.  Some  body 
ought  to  enrich  your  collection  at  the  laboratory  by  characteristic 
samples,  for  after  awhile  some  of  them  will  probably  not  be  found, 
as  I  notice  the  rock  iB  changing  somewhat  with  depth. 

When  you  can  find  the.  time,  I  would  be  pleased  to  have  from 
you  the  name  and  address  of  the  Geman  who  has  discovered  the  new 
method  of  smelting  steel  or  iron  without  fire. 

Yesterday  at  your  laboratory  I  noticed  that  you  were  using 
some  fire  brick  for  the  cement  plant  which  may  not  prove  entirely 
satisfactory.  I  have  obtained  best  results  in  somewhat  similar 
work  from  the  Mt.  Savage,  Maryland,  fire  brick. 

With  kindf  regards,  and  best  wishes,  I  remain 
Faithfully  yours. 


'  Dear  Kr.  Edison: - 


You  will  recollect  that,  when  ho  last  saw  you,  Kr.Villard 
spoke  of  an  insulating  material  called  ambroin.  I  enclose  a  pro¬ 
spectus  of  the  claims  made  for  it,  and  send  you  to-day  hy  express 
two  samples  both  made  in  Germany,  the  larger  of  v/hich  purports  to 
be  fire-proof.  I  wound  ask  in  Mr.Villard's  behalf  if  you  will 
•icindly  have  a  test  made  of  this  material  to  ascertain  whether  the 
claims  made  for  it  are  well  founded. 


X 


Truly  yoi 


[ENCLOSURE] 


"AMBROIN.  " 


Ambroin  is  the  best  and  cheapest  substitute  for  hard  rubber 
y^iber 

celluloid,  vulcaniiiB),-; i-slate,  ebony,  etc. 

It  is  a  REH1ARKA3LE  INSULATOR  OP  ELECTRICITY,  and  is  therefore 
especially  adapted  POR  USE  IN  ELECTRIC  MANPACTURES . 

It  is  manufactured  in  four  principal  grade,  as  follows:-  1 

Grade  1.  Insulating  material. 

Grade  2.  Acid-proof  material. 

Grade  3.  Alkali-proof  material. 

Grade  4.  Por  withstanding  high  temperatures. 

Ambroin  has  a  specific  gravity  varying  from  1.4  to  1.8.  It  is 
applicable  to  the  production  of  all  articles  employed  in  electric 
insulation  for  dynamos,  motors,  transformers,  switch-boards,  fuse- 
blocks,  cut-out  blocks,  etc.  Also  for  acid-proof  vessels  for  use 
in  the  chemical  industries,  for  various  articles  used  in  surgery  - 
in  fact,  its  applications  are  innumerable. 

Ambroin  can  be  produced  in  various  dark  colors,  also  in  dense 
black  and  marbled.  It  is  much  cheaper  than  hard  rubber,  and,  as 
compared  with  the  latter,  it  offers  much  greater  resistance  to  the 
action  of  high  temperature  and  the  elements. 

IT  IS  PLASTIC. 

Ambroin  may  be  molded  without  danger  of  the  slightest  subse¬ 
quent  shrinkage;  consequently,  objects  of  the  most  complicated 
form,  made  therefrom,  may  at  any  future  time  be  int.erchangedi 
which  is  impossible  with  hard  rubber.  This  feature  is  of  great 
value  in  the  event  of  one  of  the  interchangeable  parts  of  a  com¬ 
plicated  apparatus  being  broken  or  damaged.  Por  purposes-1  in  which 
a  high  finish  in,  unnecessary,  the  articles  are  ready- for  immediate 
use,  when  they  leave  the  mold;  and  a'subsequent  fitting  and  finish¬ 
ing,  involving  hand  work,  is  unnecessary. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


0 


-2- 

Ambroin  cement  and  polished  like  wood.  Ambroin  scraps  may  be  re¬ 
worked,  without  deterioration  of  quality. 

BEHAVIOr-  WHEN  EXPOSED  TO  THE  WEATHER. 

Ambroin,  as  compared  with  vulcanized  asbestos,  vulcanized  fiber, 
etc,,  is  practically  non-absorbent,  a3  regards  moisture,  when  ex¬ 
posed  to  the  weather.  This  is  or  great  importance  in  insulating 
materials,  because  absorbed  moisture,  diminishes  insulating  capac¬ 
ity,  very  materially;  and  injvinter,  the  action  of  cold  may  cause 
the  destruction  of  insulators  containing  absorbed  moisture.  It  is 
free  from  all  substances  which,  by  the  action  of  atmospheric 
moisture,  might  affect  a  gradual  deterioration,  such,  for  instance, 
as  the  free  sulphur  contained  in  hard  rubber. 

Experiments  in  regard  to  the  absorption  of  water,  gave  the  fol¬ 
lowing  results: 

Of  the  materials  tested,  pieces  having  the  same  area  were  im¬ 
mersed  in  water  at  a  termperature  of  75  degrees  C.,  in  which  they 
were  allowed  to  remain  for  1-1/2  hours. 

Ambroin  No.  1,-- -  Increase  in  weight;  0.32/ 

Aetna  material,-- -  «  h  »  3.17/ 

(The  surface  became  rough)  ' 

Stabilite, - «  n  «  41^ 

Vulcanized  asbestos, -  «  ,11  «  4^80/ 

Vulcanized  fiber, -  »  it  «  24^5/ 

These  figures  serve  to  express  the  exact  inverse  value  of  the 
various  materials,  as  insulators,  when  used  in  the  open  air. 

insulating  properties. 

Ambroin  is  a  remarkable  insulator  of  electricity,  even  for 
currents  of  high  tension,  as  the  following  results  of  experiments 
will  demonstrate: 


INSULATION  RESISTANCE. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


3. 

tightly  pressed  electrodes,  having  an  area  of  25  square  centi¬ 
meters,  at  200  volts. 

Without  previous  treatment,  the  resistance  was  200,000  megohms. 

The  saucers  wore  filled  to  about  half  their  capacity  with  sul¬ 
phuric  acid  of  26  degrees  Be.,  covered,  and  placed  in  a  thermostat 
having  a  temperature  of  49  degrees,  in  which  they  were  allowed  to 
remain  for  ten  days.  The  surface  was  then  dried  with  blotting 
paper,  and  on  the  following  day  the  resistance  was  found  to  be 
150,000  megohms.  Two  days  later  it  was  200,000  megohms. 

resistance  to  fereeration. 

Experiments  with  air-dried  plates: 

Aetna  material  (shellac  and  asbestos)  0.86  mm.  thick,  was  per¬ 
forated  at  4,000  volts. 

Ambroin  (grade  No.l.)  0.34mm. thick,  was  perforated  at  5,000 
volts. 

Experiments  with  moistened  plates: 

The  plates  wore  placed  in  water,  which  was  then  heated  to  boil- 
had 

ing,  and  after  the  water-cooled  to  about  30  degrees  C.-  they  were 
taken  out  and  tested. 

Aetna  material  1mm. thick  was  perforated  at  3,500  volts. 

Ambroin, No.l,  0.84mm.  thick  was  not  perforated  at  5,000  volts, 

A  plate  (No.l)  5mm. thick,  was  not  perforated  at  36,000  volts, 
after  having  been  exposed  to  air  containing  95^:KgxHwa  humidity, 
for  a  number  of  days-. 

RESISTANCE  TO  THE  ACTION  OF  .HEAT . 

Ambroin  (normal  grade  No.l)  ignites  only  after  prolonged  heating 
at  a  temperature  above  400  degrees  C.  Cummutator  rings  made  from 
this  grade  withstand  the  prolonged  heating  in  the  presence  of 
lubricating  oil,  in  every  particular.  A  special  grade,  designed 


[ENCLOSURE] 


-or  use  as  diaphragms  of  controllers,  etc.,  withstand  the  action 
of  the  hottest  zone  of  the  Bunsen  flame,  for  a  re&  tively  long 
time;  and  the  employment  of  this -grade  is  recommended  in  situations 
in  which  the  momentarily  intense  heat,  due  to  the  arc  formed  by  a 
short  circuit,  is  to  be  feared. 

For  comparison,  the  following  data  in  regard  to  other  insulating 
materials,  are  given; 

Hard  rubber  and  celluloid  begin  to  soften  in  water  at  a  tem¬ 
perature  of  70  degrees  C.  Celluloid  begins  to  burn  at  a  temper¬ 
ature  of  175  degrees  C.  and  hard  rubber  ignites  at  180  degress  C. 

RESISTANCE  TO  ACIDS  AND  ALKALIES . 

Ambroin,  grade  No. 2,  is  not  attacked  by  a  sulphuric  acid  of  45 
degrees  Be.,  nor  by  concentrated  hydrochloric  acid,  at  a  temperat¬ 
ure  of  80  degrees  C.  It  is  not  materially  affected  by  nitric  acid 
of  24  degrees  Be.,  only  a  very  slight  nitration  of  the  surface 
being  effected. 

Grade  No. 3  resists  the  action  of  solutions  of  caustic  potash  up 
to  30X  strength,  and  of  acetic  acid  up  to  50^  strength. 

STRENGTH. 

As  regards  tensile  strength  and  resistance  to  compression, 
ambroin  is  superior  to  all  insulating  materials  made  from  gums  or 
resins. 

The  experiments  gave  the  following  results: 

Tensile  Strength, 

While  hard  rubber  is  perfectly  elastic  at  50  to  70  degrees  C. 
ambroin  is  considerably  stronger  at  this  temperature,  than  when 
cold.  Hence,  the  following  experiments  were  made  at  ordinary, 
atmospheric  temperatures;  and  the  tests  for  determining  the  ulti¬ 
mate  strengths  of  the  various  materials,  were  made  with  rods,  care- 


[ENCLOSURE] 


5. 

fully  turned  to  a  uniform  diameter, 
mate  tensile  strengths: 


The  following 


V 


wore  the  ulti-  ■  • ; 


Hard  rubber  (per  square  cm.) 

Aetna  material  "  "  " 

Ambroin  No.l  "  "  " 


79  Kilos. 
'  98  » 

151  » 


RES I STANCE  TO  COMPRESSION. 

Cubes  of  25mm. edge.  Area  of  surface  about  6.4  square  centi- 


At  ordinary  atmospheric  temperature, 

Ambroin,  1216  Kilos 

Hard  rubber,  997  " 

Aetna  material,  331  " 

At  60  degrees  C., 

Ambroin,  888  "  , 

Hard  rubber,  The  compression  began  at  a  very  light 
load. 

Commutator  ring,  external  diameter,  26.8cm.,  internal  diameter 
16.75  cm.  Heated  to  100.  degrees  C.  during  the  test.  The  break 
occurred  at  a  pressure  of  176,000  kilos.  As  the  ring  was  not  of 
perfectly  true  form,  the  pressure  was  not  dniformly  distributed. 


T.^Lcc  03 


M,rlT£  ES^j&UEz: 

c 

0&£*W-  <w  %xu£uui  u<  Z^,?  y 

,.  fj?*  *»**-<*2«.  orc^cr  otxefig*  vfatf; 

k  * 

?w  *^<37C^  ^Z^Z^aACvtK 

/  #r— ^/-*--  /?/?-  ^ 'SUiS-C^snsunt  i 

W^ I 

W  <CUU<i&/,  Ofaog/ 


^gCcs&u-  * 


DENVER,  COLO., _ _ l_ . 

au.c(  QtGfcijC  ^  /A  Urcts  Afv?^a^r  $z  fr-z<zA 

'faaT-LUS/^  -j'V  - 7Trs„  ^  f7.  /f  /£-  ,  _  «.  *s  _vV  ..  •  S 


Waa&jsf  a«/^  ecs&  JpM  ^  * 

A  /wjg  /.  .  v?Z  CcqZ*<z-*&J  rjacf  Qazu& 

£2L 

*»«'  &-  £*■/“  s- 


°‘A"t(rj~%  y*-' "“'“»■ 

zsr* 


?  ’^•r*4^u~y*fctdr 


|  G&'Sckct/L 


-  JSU 


aS«  :%*ks__ 

:  f/E-**  1 

'flaumaogy  u,<z«t^A.  T*r%i 


DENVEIi,  CC 


*/  Thty^^'G’^  ,'A  ^tf'V/toTyWs. 

S  **!  aSfa/*n/',a*«l  acflrtZ/u^rTif/ 

'*«<*  <“  J^£x  itS&ki  Ga&n^ 

«*=-■« 

's^^^ZZ2'S&SiK’Z<'^/T 

<~<  ~^JD£2g  ?%?Z?i£**** 

"’Tf^L^-  4tw' 


<7S2«^ 

&6svu£vk  1tT%ir^%r/ c 


- - — -»cw  .« 

/  /f€3.  £f\.  /$  ^r. 


J3*  ^  ^ 

4/fi»  tvnftzct  ^du<  §,  QW&i  7  duct  o<s^  *  " 


fS  f, 


DBNVKH,  COI.O., _ | 

Cf(c(  a^-c^aif, uiticccf  ~^~~i •&  @nc&^C(  <2s^n>  \ 

o^^nJtvjfuo  ^sa/i  a^£,^auO’-/^ 

'r'  //o  as  tA  A 

Cffxzt-faueg/  5^tC, 

r'.fr-A'L  54u« 

S-wfano- 

V-Ztr& 

jv^  «-—  f2%3UL 

A/c^s,  <=v  **«**•  A-£l^  &/ 

"V 

sf'xz'  \ 


yfautiS^fe,  e««  fa  faux & S 

&-&6sa,c**  a*  arraej  c«  «/ 

“T°±~ 

*j/ 


ujTZ.f*?**-  ^  <^%rii 


$U/& (£/Z<?(tJ  c_ 

rfaokf'ficcrf  Ocnuftfaug  <SctA  CU  --duiuctf^ 


pJ^O-V\  .  - 

Chicago,  July  14th,  1900. 

W.  E.  Gilmore,  Esq.  ! 

General  Manager,  Edison  Phonograph  Works,  j 

Orange,  N.  J. 

My  Dear  Gilmore: 

I  have  your  favor  of  the  12th  enclosing  proposed 
agreement  between  myself,  the  Bates  Manufacturing  Company  and  the  .  .  j 

Edison  Phonograph  Works.  The  agreement  in  question  covers  the  arrange-,' 
ment  between  Mr.  Edison  and  you  and  myself,  except  that  my  recollection  ; ! 
is  that  the  royalty  was  to  be  paid  as  long  as  the  apparatus  in  question 
was  manufactured,  and  was  not  to  be  limited  by  the  expiration  of 
any  patents.  It  seemed  to  me  kbmk  at  the  time  that  Mr.  Edison  made 
the  suggestion  that  it  was  a  fair  way  of  arranging  the  matter  in  view 
of  the  very  large  sum  I  have  invested  in  the  Bates  business.  Personally, 
I  would  very  much  rather  make  an  out  and  out  sale  of  my  interest  on  ! 

the  terms  I  suggested  to  you  some  time  ago.  I  am  going  to  New  York 
on  Monday  night,  and  shall  be  at  the  Waldorf-Astoria  for  two  or  three 
days.  If  convenient  to  you  I  would  like  to  Bit  down  and  discuss  the  j 

matter  with  you.  You  oan  reach  mw  by  mail  at  the  hotel,  or  by  f 

telephone  at  the  General  Incandescent  Aro  Light  Company. 

Thanking  you  for  giving  attention  to  this  matter,  I  remain,  ij 


EDISON  BUILDING, 


Chicago,  July  23rd,  1900. 


W.  E.  Gilmore,  Esq,. 

Care  Edison  Manufacturing  Company 
Orange,  N.  J. 

My  Dear  Gilmore: 


l\.  lIVED 


S'* 


I  received  your  favor  of  the  17th  at  the  Waldorf-Astoria, 
and  telephoned  you  to  your  office  the  next  afternoon,  hut  was  told  that 
you  had  to  go  out  of  town.  •  Holmes  told  me  that  you  expected  to  he 
West  at  an  early  date.  I  hope  when  you  come  out  here  that  we  will  he 
able  to  fix  raattorB  up  mutually  satisfactory  wifch  relation  to  the  Bates 

contract.  _ _ x  \_f- 

Yours  truly 


Chicago,  August  29th,  1900, 


W.  E.  Gilmore,  Esq.. 

Care  Edison  Manufacturing  Company, 

Orange,  N. 

My  Dear  Gilmore: 

I  received  your  telegram  yesterday  stating  that  you 
had  sent  the  notes  hy  special  delivery,  and  would  send  the  release  later. 
I  am  of  course  willing  to  si  gn  anything  in  reason  that  your  lawyer  wants 
me  to  in  the  way  of  a  release.  I  have  no  doubt  when  it  arrives  it  will 
be  entirely  satisfactory.  I  presume  I  will  get  the  notes  from  you 
tomorrow. 


Chicago,  September  1st,  1900, 


Ediii  on  Phonograph  Works 
Orange,  N.J. 

My  Dear  Gilmore: 


In  your  letter  of  the 


SEP.  4-  1.900  I 

s  28th  of  August  you 


^ * 


[gust  you  speak  of 


the  125  shares  of  Bates  Manufacturing  Company's  stock  which  I  hold. 
All  I  hold  is  63  shares,  which  I  have  endorsed  and  sent  you  by 


same  mail  under  separate  registered  coYer. 


I  have  not  put  the 


revenue  stamps  on  this  certificate,  as  I  do  not  know  what  revenue 
stamps  should  go  on  it,  considering  the  nature  of  the  transfer.  Will 
you  please  find  out  from  your  lawyers  what  should  go  on,  and  put  them 
on  and  cancel  them  and  let  me  know  and  I  will  reimburse  you. 

If  you  will  refer  back  to  the  oontraot  of  the  21st  of  June, 

1895,  you  will  find  in  olause  number  two  that  the  oapital  stock  of  the 
Bates  Manufacturing  Company,  amounting  to  250  shares,  was  to  be 
transferred  125  shares  to  the  Edison  Phonograph  WorkB,  63  shares 
to  sadd  Insull  and  62  shares  to  said  Bates.  This  was  done  under 
that  oontraoit.  Later  on  you  bought  the  Bates  stook,  so  that  that 
gave  the  Phonograph  Works  187  shares.  The  63  shares  above  referred 
to  which  I  have  sent  you,  make 8  the  total  capital  stock.  I  find 


in  a  letter  whioh  you  wrote  me  on  August  18th,  1898,  you  refer  to 
my  having  $6,300.  worth  of  stook. 


(2) 


not  correct  in  my  above  statements,  please  let  me  know. 
Yours  truly 


EDISON  BUILDING, 


Chicago,  September  10th,  1900. 


,  Gilmore,  Esq. 


i'  P  r  r  >■'  ’  ■  "  O' 

General  Manager,  Edison  Phonograph  Worses  v  1  •  1  -  ; 

Orange,  N.J.  |  SE,n  W-'MQ  j 

Dear  sir:  kd 

I  return  you  herewith  the  signed  co^S 
which  you  sent  me.  1  have  had  these  re-copied,  inasmuch  as  there 

was  an  error  in  the  release  (the  amount  should  have  "been  63  shares 
instead  of  125)  and  have  signed  the  new  copies  in  duplicate  and 
enclose  them  herewith.  Please  have  the  Phonograph  Works  and  the 
Bates  Company  execute  both  of  the  new  copies  enclosed  herewith, 
keep  one  yourself  and  forward  one  to  me. 

I  shall  be  glad  if  you  will  forward  me  a  check  for  royalty  up 
to  the  first  of  September  at  your  earliest  convenience  so  as  to  close 
the  matter  out. 


Yours  truly 


[ATTACHMENT] 


AN  AGREEMENT  made  this  first  day  of  September ,nineteen 
hundred,  between  SAMUEL  INSULL,  party  of  the  first  part,  the  BATES 
MANUFACTUH  NG  COMPANY,  party  of  the  second  part,  and  the  EDISON 
PHONOGRAPH  WORKS;  party  of  the  third  part. 

WHEREAS  the  party  of  the  second  part  is  indebted  to  the 
party  of  the  first  part  in  the  sum  of  Fourteen  Thousand  Eight  Hundred  and 
Sixty-six  dollars  and  Thirty-four  cents($14,8G6.34)  which  said  indebt¬ 
edness  has  been  assumed  by  the  party  of  the  third  part,  and  the  party  of 
the  first  part  is  the  owner  of  sixty-iil ree  (63)  shares  of  the  capital 
stock  of  the  party  of  the  second  part,  which  shares  of  stock  the  party 
of  the  first  part  has  transferred  to  the  party  of  the  third  part  at 
the  time  of  the  execution  of  this  agreement  as  part  of  the  considera¬ 
tion  thereof. 

AND  WHEREAS  the  party  of  the  third  part  at  the  time  of  the 
execution  of  this  agreement  has  executed  and  delivered  to  the  party  of 
the  first  part  its  twelve  certain  promissory  notes,  dated  September 
first, Nineteen  hundred, made  to  his  order, for  One  Thousand  dollars 
($1,000.)  each  with  interest  at  five  per  cent  per  annum  from  such  date, 
the  first  note  falling  due  three  months  from  date  and  succeeding  notes 
falling  due  each  succeeding  three  months  thereafter,  the  last  note 
falling  due  three  years  from  date. 

NOW  THEREFORE,  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of,  One  dollar 
($1,00)  paid  to  the  party  of  the  first  part  by  the  party  of  the  second 
part, and  in  consideration  of  the  foregoing  premises, the  said  party  of  the 
first  part, for  himself, his  heirs , executors  and  administrators , releases 
and  discharges-  the  said  parties  of  the  second  and  third  parts  respective 
ly  and  their  successors  and  each  of  them, of  and  from  all  mamer  of  action 
and  actions,  cause  and  causes  of  action,  suits,  debts, dues,  sums  of 
money, accounts .royalties,  reckonings .bonds ,  bills,  specialties 
covenants,  contracts,  controversies,  agreements,  promises,  variances, 
trespasses,  damages,  judgements,  executions,  claims  and  demands  whatso¬ 
ever  in  law  or  in  equity .which  against  the  said  parties  of  the  second  and 


[ATTACHMENT! 


third  parts,  or  either  of  them, the  said  party  of  the  first  part  ever 
had, now  has  or  which  his  heirs,  executors  or  administrators , hereafter 
can,  shall, or  may  have,  for,  upon  or  by  reason  of  any  matter,  cause 
or  thingv.  whatsoever,  from  the  beginning  of  the  world  to  the  day  of  the 
date  of  these  presents,  excepting  the  above  mentioned  promissory  notes. 

AND  the  parites  of  the  second  and  third  parts  respectively  and  each 
of  them,  in  consideration  of  the  premises  and  of  fli  e  s  un  of  One  Dollar 
($1,00)  paid  to  the  party  of  the  second  part  by  the  party  of  the  first 
part, release  and  discharge  the  party  of  the  first  part,  his  heirs, 
executors  and  administrators  of  and  from  all  and  all  manner  of  action 
and  actions,  cause  and  causes  of  action,  suits,  debts,  dues  ,  sums  of 
money,  accounts,  royalties,  reckonings,  bonds,  bills,  specialties, 
covenants,  contracts,  controversies,  agreements,  premises,  variances, 
trespasses,  damages,  judgments,  executions,  claims  and  demands  what¬ 
soever,  in  law  or  in  equity, which  against  the  party  of  the  first  part 
tie  parties  of  the  second  and  third  parts,  or  either  of  them,  ever  had, 
now  have, or  vAiich  their  s  ucoessors,  or  the  successors  of  either  of  them, 
hereafter  can,  shall,  or  may  have,  for,  upon  or  by  reason  of  ary  matter  , 
cause  or  thing  whatsoever,  from  the  beginning  of  the' world  to  the  day 
of  t be  date  of  these  presents. 


IN  W3TNJ5SS  WHEREOP  the  party  of  the  first  part  has  hereto  set  his 
hand  and  seal,  and  the  parties  of  the  second  gndl.tfcird  parts  have 
respectively  hereto  set  their  corporate  seals  and  caused  these  presents 
to  be  eI  gned  by  their  duly  authorized  officers,  in  duplicate,  the  day 


and  year  first  above  written. 
Signed,  sealed  and  delivered 
in  the  presence  of 
William  A.  Pox 


(Signed)  Samuel  Insull 


Bates  Manufacturing  Co. 
By  W.  E.  Gilmore 
President 


Attest 


P. Randolph 
Secretary 


Attest 


.  P.  Randolph 

Secretary 


Edison  Phonograph  Word® 

Ey  Thos.  A.  Edison 

President 


Blair  C~  Co. 

3a  WAI.L  STKKHT. 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq. , 
Llewellyn  Park , 


Orange , 


Dear  Sir;- 


A  Certificate  has  recently  come  into  our  hands  for  stock 
of  the  Edison  Electric  Eight  Company  of  Europe  (Ltd).  The  Certificate 
was  issued  in  1881  and  was  registered  by  the  Earners*  Loan  &  Trust 
Company  and  is  signed  by  yourself  as  President. 


Would  you  be  kind  enough  to  tell  us  what  became  of  this 
Company  and  whether  the  stock  is  at  present  of  any  value. 

Thanking  you  in  advance  for  any  information  which  you  may  be 
able  to  give  us  on  this  subject,,  believe  us, 


Very  truly  yours. 


VM 

v-  £■ 


My  dear  Mr.  Edison:- 

If  entirely  convenient  to  you,  it  would  "be  a  great 
accommodation  for  the  Young  Hen's  Christian  Association  to  receive  a  check 
for  your  subscription  of  $100.  which  you  made  last  Spring,  the  same  to  ho 
applied  toward  our  current  expenses.  Last  year  you  paid  us  the  early 
part  of  December.  I  would  not  ask  for  it  but  we  really  need  it  in  order 
to  meet  some  obligations  which  will  be  due  this'  month. 

I  wish  to  thank  you  for  the  interest  which  you  have  always 
taken  in  this  institution.  There  are  a  number  of  your  employes  who  make 
use  of  the  building  and  I  know  that  they  are  all  benefited  thereby.  Our 
building  is  so  crowded  that  we  have  been  compelled  to  refuse  to  take  in 
any  more  in  the  Boys’  Department.  We  have  just' received  a  contribution  • 
of  $40,000.  toward  a  new  building  from  Hr.  Stickler,  and  we  hope  before 
next' year  is  over  to  start  building,  but  will  not  do  so  until  we  have 
raised  sufficient  funds  to  go  into  the  building  free  of  all  indebtedness. 

Again  thanking  you  for  your  contribution,  I  remain, 

Yours  very  truly, 

P.S.  You  may  send  the  oheok  either  to  me  or  to  our  Treasurer,  George  F. 
Seely,  care  of  the  Young  Men's  Christian  Association,  Main  St. 

i 


Mr.  Thomas  Edison. 


1900.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Employment  (D-00-04) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  from  or  about  employees  and 
former  or  prospective  employees.  Included  are  three  letters  by  Elbert  A. 
Wilson,  a  chemist  whom  Edison  was  interested  in  hiring,  and  a  letter  by  former 
employee  Owen  J.  Conley. 

Approximately  30  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  Among 
the  unselected  items  are  requests  for  employment  at  the  West  Orange 
laboratory,  an  offer  to  represent  Edison  at  the  Paris  Exposition  of  1900,  and  a 
letter  recommending  a  field  geologist  for  Edison's  New  Mexican  mining 
endeavor. 


*■  r 


slCWaJi" 


_ ,  ^  * 


•Stfe/pect,— 


i.-2.6th-,1900 


Mr.  R.  L.  Taft, 

Monmument  House, 

Woonsooket,R.  I. 

Dear  Sir:  — 

Your  favor  of  the  23rd  inst.  at  hand  and  contents  noted.  The 
hours  work  here  at  the  Laboratory  are  fifty-four  per  week,  and  if 
this  would  be  satisfactory  to  you,  you  can  come  on  and  see  Mr. 

Edison  in  resard  to  a  position  with  him,  and  we  will  pay  your  Rail¬ 
road  fare  one  way.  Please  notify  us. 


aiuufi 

ctk  ’fooJ&y  y# 

CUcttu  oJl^s  i^aJ^ZJL  Sf,  /7C  *■ 

^c^h)  i-e~  Jbi  <zZ<^ 

stC.  y. 


y? 


a  ^f/^yyZy: 


[ON  BACK  OF  PRECEDING  PAGE] 


&JL,  dXey 

\J  &y\  v.  c?-^<j  L&X&<- 1  oJ2^^> 


0^.  {font  <+,'/$** 

O.  J.  conle4 


.  ,*.S,.«U  w  (  w  / 

C  ’  L>-  o^M  , 

’Sdc^tr^-  ^  ,a^cA 

c^rTL^tP,.  1?^ 


J  Af* 

_  j,  ,.  f .  -  y  ?H^aa^  £***~t-  u^~ 

■  *_ 

U~  CS-J-  ^ 

_i  -br^se-T— - <if*^A-*-^, 

&■**  yi-lPT'  ^*^*~ ,'^2’ 
«-*-*<-*-  a-^^- — ^7-  -t-<^_  ^T~ ^-*’—  - 

uj-.  i^,  C^ZZ^ZZ  **■  <=“-y  fix#*-*-  i*~i-*- 

U  iu.  7?-  f~- 

^ ~ 

*li*U*~ 

wkt*zr  te  *&  e^zzuy  r^ZTlZM^ 

*3~~-  iW  X-  <^0.  /"  f'-*u^~  ^ 

-  7^7- 


1900.  Edison,  T.A.  -  Family  (D-00-05) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  concerning 
Edison's  family.  Included  are  items  regarding  Thomas  A.  Edison,  Jr.'s 
business  activities;  a  letter  by  William  Leslie  Edison  complaining  about  the 
behavior  of  his  sister-in-law,  Marie  Toohey  Edison;  a  notice  regarding  the 
death  of  Edison's  sister,  Marion  Wallace  Page;  and  letters  from  two  Edison 
cousins  requesting  financial  assistance.  There  is  also  a  draft  version  in 
Edison's  hand  of  the  will  of  Mary  V.  Miller,  the  mother  of  Mina  Miller  Edison. 


All  of  the  documents  have  been  selected  except  for  duplicates. 


^  I 

i  4  M 
T'=:i> 

$  O  1 

y  t  ^ 

Ji'N  3 

3  ^  ; 

j, „  -  l  .  s  i».,r  1 

_3  YCY&flrv^  \j  KKYvWcr  CXWvcm,  Aivnvm  J4Cawi«A^ 

W\j$\e^b\<x\4.  <^  C&\\0  Ao  Wuikt  ipuJbfws#  rwvi^ 

cKecXcxn«_  Vt\ud  VWt^  ^ <xcct“  tOA^f..  cwv<A  AcMcA/vne/nA  _  £/v\ _ 

.'YWa/vwv**'  .new o&v/wcy  aW  |om»M  un$&> _  _ I 

: 

'"  3  ^  ~  : 

44  *  4  ’ 

l  ^  j  ,  <i  . 

Isi4> 

£/|vaA.C.v|v.  ft&- 

;  /kc  c6.. 

j;  dcuMjjhJusi, 

jylvi\  : _ 9  avc\e/r  cxW  TTYVA^  ^  tvSt- cleb-t*  cwacA  ^iA/V»«ne<X# _ 

C^se/ws* fc4>  6e. . ^3<x>.ct..aA.  Acw  m  lj  de<x#\  oca  -vn cu^ 

Sacond _ 9  cjiut  cvwcA  (bt^jux>4£i.  ^luro  V\wv><An.e<A  <A»$cuaa. 

— Ao V&ve, {£aacs\ i!YX\fcV&o<^v&A^LC^\AncRc^^C^^ 

4$vvtcK - 9_c^vAj.i_c\T\<A_Q>tcyAe<*A^\ _ 

A\oajc&« — w\  CXAv%  ova  Q^yvo _ A.oljm.v^_cAa_vvj^^c^_J]!31aOT^_ _ j 

.-£.  4^'^^  a/weL  Qrocce  1(y\A^^r^u>aA^  r .  £$vavvJ?<A  owe_ _ j 

jyrvcv^_i^_/^AekAvvvm.c(^AC<AJg^  | 

^otxwr^T  0$?  Y&e  AAeSlr cw\<A  n^ebtc^vAc-  o^-awv^  e«toCtc" 

\\  l&XL-i  d n'Utrd 

eo-SLcvvA A_^p.«AA0YA.«.2 _ u?^Acx\>&oeAitn.  cvwc\  u^oilaopatm'' 

v&A^cUe/4_C^VOi_CVVAdJo4<^eoA^^^YVA^„C^\?<^CAaf«lu^0W*ill«V- 

_ &c&e4lCX^(X\v^<n;,  «Qtwv&  (X'TT\\V?e/r. 

4<^?w^kffi\.^<^.iyXAvrv^JXyA4cA\Acr>vv^(T\ow  _ 

c\x*ce,  \ 

XA^vvcm^-lV^emA  ^^t^fc  cw\cK  /a&cVAg.  oJUftte.,  9-^evw^  efy  i  1 
.V»-^_^cvacA_cAaa?  <^e^_c^t^_W^crrL_JYV\i^_cAejC_e_<x<>e.4  e.cujvvvcy 1 

^\A^M^_6^WAALw<^_cj^\^er4vwe-_o^vYA«^_cAe5^A,_V$\«^5cvv«A _ i;J 

l 

W^^<-  'pA*  9>\wpC*  CVVAcS  "VV^  (JM  coip  *Vcl  ~~  is 

[CONTINUED  ON  NEXT  FRAME] 

4- 


! 

£c*-Pcw\  c^v&<jy>  e>S — u$v  aK o  evuv  cw»  <A  uirfvotc^&o  csr^C" 

.S>?ta<4«X  y  c^v\>4  cwuA  ta.c^ivea&.  c^\ffiWev\£a»i6WltlU 

Ro^enA'CX'Y'Q  \%%<n  Xcwjua  CX  '"'PfYi  ?Pc^- 

gclU^TjW^P  'WVyg^M  1 

kiutto 

cv w> gvr^AY&e/vvv^aSv  cMYecvy\<A_'££vciryg.  cJlifoe..  ^J^cn/wt^  o^ 
-*V»^  4>oacI  ^v^<^evw_cki4.J^crn.  JYv><^_c\eceo^>e.  *[e.0Lm/wcy 
;A/«uc^u»is^«y_cdLV&elS^ _ 

^&cwe._<^_£Avc&_cke_c«L^ed>,  C&  %&A  a&aJM  <y>-*77 

- 5_^.ow_v>3lC^^_ccjvv*A  U  uJl-c. _ cw>  <A_cu^>o.im)l  <^Lrcx _ ] 

.'TCI  YXVtff&ncyv^JT^  ^  V^t'A~  | 

;^W\t^  HcZSX  (mv$  cw\<A  Ae^AtvmC/vU  cwac4  c^lnecA  ~tf\d£~  _  j 

lIWecMkcn  o^-  Y&e/m  6t  j\ecyAtneJl*Ao-  c^uv>e_  Qxmota—  _ • 

; -  Slw ..  WitJ!<W..Vvfe<a«.e^_3.  ^cw>c  V\<n«Ao  ^4)cA  ^i^  ?v  ci/vsc^ _ 

L$VV& - '^•otAA^ffr-  ,{\(Xu^o^  ^CU\uarvt( 

/  .  . . . 

[ 

_^Av«\r>e<A^  ^«xW2u>^ cxA _cvvvcl_d.e<AWve<A_c^<vv\dl  £or  ^i«n 

Aa£Tv» M  0^<A*TeM<vmc/rA  (yufTfte  \eMcdq^,  cmn. _ 

-^&vetoce._^&^_a^lj&e»_iftei^[n5tIIci^tflLt(»JU:e«_^an!eA*«\©j^_ _ 

Cvv\<A  vv\'l^_^e^>«^ftce_  0^  €cvc^  '^;^cn.  Uc«jye 

oun  /Y\cvvy\-eA-_  cK£>  ^x* Jfco  c/t  iAim^  lju  JLv>g  t**.«  *.  _ 

(^^urvwaAi-  CL,  ^<=C«-o*7»i___* 

u  ■ 

- - - : - - _ , 

•  OT»rC. 


■£>' 


J?o6' 


[  Telegram. 

S" 

Chicago,  til.  Jan.  31,  1900. 

Thomas  A.  Alisoni 

Mother  diad  10,30  tonight.  Will  take  remains  to  Milan 
Thureciay  night’s  train.  Funoral  Friday  or  Saturday.  Awaiting 
your  answer  if  you  can  com®  thore.  Answar  Chicago. 


Mr 8,  3eo.  W,  Rietina. 


cLl 


T 


-cUv.  IA^-aJL^VN  /O  - «l 

U  tfcc^r  w»i\  1 


THE  WESTERN  UNION  TELEGRAPH  COMPANY. 

-  INCORPORATED - 

'  21,000  OFFICES  IN  AMERICA.  CABLE  SERVICE  TO  ALU  THE 


WORLD. 


•  (1UF 
(J^'  h 

THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  Jn.,  c< 
A.  A.  FRIEDENSTEIN,  GENE 


Jutcvnatloual  gttfciut  of 


Science  and  guucntlon. 

EDISON  BUILDING. 


Slew  3)av1t, 


8, .  I  SI  00. 


Mr.  Thos.  Ao  Edison,  * 

Lewellyn  Park,  N.  J. 

Dear  Sir; 

Herewith  we  beg  to  call  your  attention  to  the  following 
matter  which  kindly  give  your  earnest  consideration. 

We  have  organized. THE  INTERNATIONAL  BUREAU  OF  SCIENCE  AND 
INVENTION,  with  branches  in  London  and  Paris,  for  the  purpose  of 
advancing  the  oause  and  furthering  the  ends  of  Soience. 

•You  will  undoubtedly  agree  with  us,  that  many  a  good  idea  of 
value  is  lying  idle,  because  the  originator  is  either  unable  or 
unwilling  to  go  to  the  expense  necessary  for  the  development  of 
same,  until  he  can  ascertain  whether  it  is  of  any  practical  value. 

WE  HAVE  UNDER  OUR  PERSONAL  SUPERVISION  A  CORPS  OF  EXPERTS, 
HEADED  BY  OUR  MR.  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  JR.,  WHO  WILL  EXAMINE  AND  LOOK 
INTO  ANY  IDEA  OR  IDEAS  SUBMITTED  TO  US,  (AS  PER  BLANK  ENCLOSED), 
GIVING  THEIR  OPINION  OF  SAME,  AND  IF  NECESSARY  MAKING  SUGGESTIONS 
TOWARD  IMPROVEMENT. 

If  the  idea  is  good,  as  it  stands,  we  will  make  you  an  offer 
for  it,  and  if  our  offer  is  accepted,  we  will  immediately  make 
application  for  patent,  allowing  you  one  third  interest  in  same. 
Said  patent  will  be  held  in  trust  until  we  have  two  hundred,  when 
a  stock  company  will  be  formed  to  market  the  patents  and  push  them, 
YOU  RETAINING  YOUR  INTEREST. 

A  COMPANY  BACKED  BY  AT  LEAST  TWO  HUNDRED  GOOD  PATENTS  AND 
SUBSTANTIAL  CAPITAL,  HEADED  BY  MR.  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  JR-.,  IS  CER¬ 
TAINLY  A  SAFE  AND  A  GOOD  INVESTMENT. 

(Of  course,  you  appreciate  the  fact,  that  all  matters  tran¬ 
sacted  by  us,  will  be  treated  in  the  strictest  confidence,  and  our 
names  and  reputations  should  sufficiently  demonstrate  to  you,  that 
you  will  be  fairly  dealt  with). 

All  ideas  submitted,  to  receive  attention,  must  be  written 


dol- 


plainly  and  in  full  on  enclosed  blank,  and  accompanied  by  one 
lar  to  cover  cost  of  expert  services,  stationery  and  postage. 
Trusting  we  can  be  of  service  to  you. 

We  beg  to  remain. 


XT  IS  UNDERSTOOD  THAT  ALL  IDEAS  NOT  ACCEPTED  ON  TERMS  SPEC¬ 
IFIED  ABOVE,  WILL  BE  HELD  SUBJECT  TO  YOUR  ORDER  AND  WILL  BE  HRT.n 
STRICTLY  CONFIDENTIAL,  THE  SAME  AS  COMMUNICATIONS  BETWEEN  CLIENT  AND 
ATTORNEY. 


Mr.  Ihos.  A.  Edison,  Jr.,  has  assured  me  that  the  above  schemejhad 
been  endorsed  by  you.  If  so,  would  you  kindly  advise  me  to  that  ef¬ 
fect,  as  I  would  not  oare  to  invest  any  money  in  any  matter  that  was 
not  striotly  0.  K.. 

Trusting  you  will  favor  me  with  a  reply,  so  that  I  can 
you 

govern  myself  accordingly,  and  thanking  in  advance  for  same. 


Believe  me  to  be. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


APPLICATION  TO 

JntcvuaHonat  gumuv  of 

lienee  and  givuention. 

EDISON  BUILDING,  44 

THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  Jr.,  consulting  expert. 

A.  A.  FRIEDENSTEIN,  general  manager. 


....Agveemeut... 

I  hereby  apply  to  tile  above  Bureau  for  their  cousidc' 
on  the  following  idea  or  ideas  and  enclose  the  si 

- dollars  ill  payment  for 

subject  to  the  conditions  of  the  attached  circular. 


NAME, 


ADDRESS, . 


W.  U.  Telegram. 

New  York  May  14,  1900. 


Thomas  A.  Edison: 

Lawyer  retained  summons  issued,  will 
on  receipt  check  $45^.  Please  answer  hy  wire. 

(Signed)  Carl  leibinger. 


stop  proceeding 


Mr.  John  Randolph, 


c/o  Edison  Laboratory, 


I  have  been  informed  by  Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison,  Jr. ,  lhat 
he  has  received  a  letter  from  you  with  reference  to  one  Frieden- 
stein.  I>  wish  to  state  that  Mr.  Edison,  Jr.,  has  signed  articles 
of  co-partnefcship  with  this  man  Friedenstein  two  or  three  weeks 
ago,  and  that  Mr.  Friedenstein  is  a  young  fellow1 just  past  21,  has 
been  very  anxious  for  Mr.  Edison  to  go  forward  with  the  project 
under  the  name,  I  believe,  of  the  International  Bureau  of  Science 


I  have  advised  Mr.  Edison,  Jr.,  that  Mr.  Friedensteii 
no  claim  upon  him  whatsoever,  and  Mr.  Edison,  Jr.,  is  not  goin* 
forward  with  the  matter  in  any  respect  whatsoever.  I  have  the 
articles  of  co-partnership  and  will  see  that  the  matter  rests  £ 


Very  sincerely  yours. 


-v 


[ENCLOSURE] 


'^Lea-v- L  -"-5^^  <Sj4^  ^Lte^ 

^-u.  ^  /^4<7. 

5^  ^  ct/w-  ^^4  &C-J 

C^AiLctsCt 

d^yazt.  ->t^L 

*^'"V  «M-  ^O-aI^ 

■^UL£  ^A.a^~<_  ^C 
^  tt^f"  ^(fe.  C^>»^  ^^o-v«-^-t^  ^ 

5-^4  ^ 

sii^sl*L^^*yizAfi>t  *  dLc^A.  auA^-^ULA 


[ENCLOSURE] 


[ON  BACK  OF  PRECEDING  PAGE] 


a,  A  \  Aa.  s., 

Arc  .(^Vrv,  \,,£V. 

— *A-V  V.....X,  v!.„b^k 


-  -  —tv  ,A- 

jV  *!k  y -^tiA  -, 

-  3fS-..  %* 

-s*x.sk*-  ^XS^-o^.  w  ^  _i%:Z 

-y-4^  -V.c)^,..  ViJvra  tJ.Jjfa  Vd,  iV!  S> 
's5k»~-"~  ^r<vA-J 

,  \>> \ .  If . 

P 

A 


~Ak.  V 
A-  kV„ . . _ 

w-§  Aw? :  A\T^  §sVrt-\ 
'*■ 


ERIE  OIL  COMPANY 

215-210  CURRIER  BUILDING 


TELEPHONE , 


LOS  ANGELES.  < 


Mr.  Thomas  Edison, 

New  York,  N.Y. 

Dear  Sir:- 


In  1883  1  came  from  Denver,  and  met  Mrs.  Fannie  Edison  Floyd 
on  that  trip  in  route  to  Los  Angeles,  cal. 

She  was  a  widow  with  one  small  boy.  At  that  time  she  seemed 
to  be  a  lady  with  some  means,  and  as  -a* handsome  a  woman  as  it  had  been  my 
to  see  for  quite  a  while,  she  made  investments,  I  think, 
wftrCTi  proved  to  be  b^d,  causing  a  conqplete  loss  to  her. 

The  boy  grew  up,  and  with  other  friends,  I  succeeded  in  get¬ 
ting  him  a  position  as  fireman  on  the  Southern  Pacific  railroad.  He 
finely  went  to  the  bad,  and  I  am  informed,  absolutely  for  several 
years  deserted  his  mother,  who  in  the  mean  time  had  taken  ill  until 
two  years  ago  she  came  to  me  physically  a  total  wreck,  and  saying  that 
she  was  absolutely  in  distress  for  the  necessities  of  life,  and  again 
asked  me  to  help  her,  or  to  assist  her  in  having  the  county  give  her 
support.  X  personally  helped  her,  and  then  made  application  to  the 
Board  of  Supervisors,  from  whom  she  has  been  receiving  at  the  expense 
of  the  county,  four  (4)  dollars  per  month,  for  the  past  two  years. 

-I-  have-not-  seen-' her  until  this  morning,  she  informs  me  that 
she  is  a  cousin  of  yours,  and  has  written  to  you  for  assistance. 

Dr.  Fitzgeral<i-:$ho  has  been  treating  her  without  any  com¬ 
pensation  whatever,  is  one  of  our  foremost  physicians. 

I  know  full  well  that  men  in 


your  position  have  many  calls 


BRIE  OIL  COMPANY 


LOS  ANGELES.  CAL.. _ ' _ .100. 


(3) 

that  they  can  not  respond  to,  but  this  lady,  while  she  is  nothing  to 
me  on  earth,  is  certainly  worthy  the  attention  of  any  good  man,  and  if 
it  were  possible  for  you  to  aid  her  1  believe  it  will  be  as  great  a 
charity  perhaps  as  you  could  give.  Today  she  stands  almost  deaf, 
bloated  and  puffed  with  drops*,  distressing  to  say  the  least  to  look 
at  her  without  knowing  the  real  facts. 

X  have  served  the  people  of  this  city  one  year  in  the  Assemb 
ly,  two  years  in  the  State  Senate,  and  four  years  ending  March  of  this 
year  as  Post  Master  of  the  Oity  of  Los  Angeles,  and  refer  you  to  any 
of  the  banks  or  Commercial  houses  of  this  City  as  to  my  standing,  and 
whether  or  ndtwould  make  any  statement  other  than  I  believe,  and  have 
good  reasons  to  know  are  the  facts,  and  would  not  write  thin  as  I  have 
were  It  not  that  X  believe  she  is  certainly  a  very  wotthp  abject  of 
your  charity,  and  has  apparently  but  a.  short  time  to  live. 

Very  respectfully  yours, 


X  am, 


'PI  LUNG  &  CRANE, 

Broad  &  Chestnut  Streets  •'  • 

'  Philadelphia.  _  August  30th.  1900.' 

Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq.,  . 

OranQS,  N.  J.‘ 

My  Dear  Hr.  Edison': 

I  hope  that  you.  still  intend  going  with  us  to 
Bamegat  on  Labor  Day  and  .that  Mrs.  Edison  with  Madeline  and  Charles 
will  also  go  with  us.  Mrs.  Pilling  and  our  children  expect  to  go 
if  the  weather  is  favorable,  and  I  think  that  she  would  feel  more 
comfortable  if  she  should  not  be  the  only  lady  in  the  party. 

Yours  very  truly,  v 

/ 

P.  S.  I  think  that  Mr.  Shelmerdine  is  likely  to  accanpany  us. 


KAfJLGL'  cj  (y* 

(l 


MlSr  isoo 


'  W  "Vv\aJlfi, 


~r 


U.€JL  . 


*  Vo  -«*>  -wa«_  ^vvow 


-w  ^  a^^^xX*^u-vvx*_ 

X^"  **“*  'ajE^  ^  -«r~~ ». 

•  "Vvl^  V*^** -  tu  Wvvwc^  D.-MHo»  o*-.  OL-Vt 

~T  ^  V~J*  fc-JjLcot., 

~~~  ^  *****  dl^  W~c_ 

I—  V~*~  tz,  Tfc__  ^e.  «M-^w 

^-*=X*-»*~«.  o.  -(J_»_i_o.  C-^ 


-{poCQv* — , 

'Uuiwjo  <K  i^t4_A 

°V  c~~^  0^00^.  «~~^>^_  Ub  <T 

yvv-  U>lX(» 

U^Cf  ttjc  UvktxA  cX_  Ct\jt  Cwjt  "O^oKtL  ^7 


Ct^llA->>^  •'V'VJLtfctJ  /^-tVtV-VV  »  V*.Cl>  Uu^. 

lAVtM^t  Ao-c  1X>V«.<A _  'Vwo^  MAC^J.  cwwcH.  ^-V.  W-*  V-<  -OtK-q  '>T^ — C_  _ 

V-  ■  ^  0X-0  !<*>. , ■  L/c^csf  *1  iavV.  -Cm.  i—^s-uA _ £  /-ut^<v»j('  vf- 

Ovt^iiV.  °L7  t -u-uLJl  alw»-t^u/  -^vwv.  “WV.^.  t(u.  rVv\*Xtu.‘  Cjeit(^| 

vAw^vjl.  V-»  b-hj.  *./1ov<.  l^vo  <3»  '>o<5+  *C_  ! 

To 


-dtsec*" 

^  C>w 


[ATTACHMENT] 


681' 


% 


.  V^JUly- 

CJ  ^pJ^W-  W4*  ^  OW  ^ 

>wJs^L/  pL,  '■^■-ApVtW  "V'-tf*'  VA^ry\A(VwtC^ 

yv-*  cnXvvJC"  awf*.  , 

'k^j^fcr  a^.  ^  v->jiw 

C^VvnS"^**/  ^sJ^>r/rffXsS^^^  ^VvVsa'Cy*  ^i*4s>  »1  •.:... 

^  V^-V1^  'Vyst  0^~  W  'WvvC* 

CA^r  «•  \S-4>  ^Vs/mSS^  A*^  ‘‘VUap^avsa,,^^ 

V$T  "H^T  vJ^s/  "V  ^~V">  -: 

"feT"  JMiC'jlfS^  OS/*^  »w< 

^  %ydW- 


'VwnxtA^jlw—  S-P**  1.0* 

W^4  _  J 

O-  -^oJ^A^xi—  °-£>  - 


tAA.  ^vjJxfcwt_Si  ”t£=>  \^A>wJ  O^cX^.  t>*-AJ\ - 

r  ■'rr-  ■>■-!■-  "Vw^  cX^Xfc^J 

”tu  ,  A4V\^jaJ-*n'"vaA\  "YjpXAJ  UvWA^ 

'VvlIiA-Ul.  ‘LoJuyaOvi  LaJ-O-O  'VSL-O-W  CjovCa-o 
CvCti>  -divjx  '  lr\  CMg^ou^asd"  ”  Ov\<2,  d-^'Vaxis 
n^y~Jr*/i  lAj-o-v-Asjfc"  -^ji-vyw^J)  J_  v^jxJ^-TXaoo 
.  v-^  _ .  ,1  „*  \j~zx-ci — 

^^A^XC4xVxoV2_.  '-WWA.  —- 

Uy^-VvA  ct^vw  -  fb^AjU  T2\SL 

'VtfAXvA.cJOte  cVU  t5Uj-_  .^«=**-''-#-"-‘y''V'’  <=“■»=* 
:  WoJXv:c|  tb  W<A-^  CR-cA^* 

Jaju*.  \xU-u-«0  Zt-cXx/fc  <p^ki  •*?  —  : 

w-  V—  -frtrr^-  !r— • 

a^^u.;  "fekA y .  eiTJ< 


TaUj-o 


<J^\s 

/VV'  o-1ag_  AOWJ3. 


I'-'.  oJo^c^lV^..  /wa  o-U-G_  ^OVIMJ, 

oLvaA^  -'vAjwacuvU^ 

O^v-Nti—  -AuUCwaA:,  "t<3  \-kwv\J»-_ 

'3-Sa^..  '—Ad  '^-^ACAAjyA-tA  Cj  CaJLj t.  VA/^ 

^pV>_  *  *  '.  ' - J-*U-»AA.  AD_1_2_j!%a 

OAA.CX 

cWa^J^  —  o^-  tDU^o| 
cfcwLc^  tb  "tftviAJL.  cUfcj  •  ■/|rSLM^s— 

Ap  CVA_  t&M.  ^vA  “^AewAvv.,  fvVC^ 

^  caaaJU-  -isvv  tfccfc 


W-ijM  comiAA,  -^-«^»VT_  ~t&VA/3  ,1 

La^^cdL-  cu-^  Ay-OvfaAinA.  ca>£-Q 

to^-»l—  vwvA.  "C^yOy,  gaaacA.  Ct  $WV*. 
bwotAX^  •  »Vv^«dMAj  ^  % 

<^■0-0-1^  -^pAAAA/Av.  CAai^<>L  cWa-A.  '-VoW 


I  Mj  V2(0_t^  c^’  ^ »J-oXi_  >— wjtc. 

rV^A_^>  'w^c^jCCi-'u. 


w  -^kvwi  cA  /3-trvo. 


L*~nj2^£_ 


^  awv.  VX/sA.£a_*^*\_Q<_j  O-^WJv*-^  tfc> 

'X^-<^UJ  U^Avtfe^  "tSlvSLa,^  \j-S%~ 

1^1  *to  CKXa,  rt.  cCw^vviA^.  «uft-  Cu  *  i 


,-vo 


0  .  i 

.c(_  ‘V  C^ty4i"  -Vj-CvW  : 

C^^r-i-  <Jp  uv\  "CLwJi_ 


yX^r-t-  ■  (Jp  iX^.  Taa«JL  ^Xjf-SSTAJy 

pi  ,wfc  . 

^  ^  V.  ^,«JL^  | 

6»i-  coo.  lW^T  -j 

r^lL  ^ 


*J^,  <5l 


W.  Leslie  Edison 

AntnmnliUta 


d 


i»  rtrcfcu^-.  tCml.  p-u.  C@9~—  huJ^, 

—  4!_  ■^/■Cul^—  A^-*- 

/f^z-  1 2^W^_— t^7  hjyPPip  Al_  ^~ 

^  *<- 


^y^dcL  itfcz*~<L 

fh?-  t~  fsA^S~  dw- 

^  Pr^AJL^Z- 


W.  XiJOsr.iK  Edison 

Automobiles 


L  7n_  tcAn_  'LCu^cL^,^,  (Luu-cf 


r 


l  %A~C) 

flu-  i, 


._-£■*—  WvCj  _  Ltp-  fUi_ 

uJL&t  iiULtnJ- 


&nJL 

£-^_ 

i-cu^—  -~$h  Idustu-  d//T%__ 


\1U. 

|i tU- 

\?&Jl 

/h,<Lj:hu«A&-  V  t  <£L_ 

v^L-fkcv  tyu- 

<<w—  ■■■^ 


-M- 


[ATTACHMENT] 


ry  ^  Zfy' 


2fei 't-72^ 


rr 


1900.  Edison  Manufacturing  Company  (D-00-09) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  the 
business  of  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Co.  Included  are  items  pertaining  to  the 
incorporation  of  the  company  in  May  1900.  There  are  also  letters  concerning 
the  U.S.  War  Department's  purchase  of  phonoplex  telegraphy  components  for 
use  in  the  Philippine  Islands.  Among  the  correspondents  is  William  E.  Gilmore, 
vice  president  and  general  manager  of  the  company. 

Approximately  70  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  Not 
selected  are  letters  concerning  insurance,  items  regarding  royalty  payments  on 
phonoplex  circuits,  and  documents  that  duplicate  selected  items. 

Other  items  in  the  Document  File  relating  to  the  Edison  Manufacturing 
Co.  can  be  found  in  D-00-01  (Battery)  and  in  D-00-15  (Motion  Pictures). 


[CA.  FEBRUARY  1900] 


Mr,  Randolph  UUu*-  >1  ^  ( 

Here  Is  the  arrangement  that  I  made  with  the  Penna.  R.  R.  Co., 
which  explains  itself.  The  Mfg.  Co.,  however,  cannot  stand  this  charge 
of  $600.00,  and  the  hills  for  the  goods  which  the  Penna.  R.  R.  Co., 
will  order,  are  to  be  charged  against  Thomas  A.  Edison.  However,  when 
the  orders  come  in  I  will  pass  on  them  and  we  will  then  decide  the 
question  as  to  how  it  shall  be  handled. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Type  "Q"Cell, 


Orange ,  N.  J. ,  Dec.  8th,  1899. 

Pennsylvania  Railroad  Co., 

A.  Hale,  Esq.,  Sup* t  Telegraph, 

Philadelphia , Pa 

Dear  Sir:-  .  ,  ‘ 

I  have  a  letter  from  Mr.  Logne,  who  saw  you  in  Phildelphia 
several  days  ago,  in  which  he  advises  that  he  has  fixed  up  the  matter 
of  the  use  of  the  Phonoplex  system  on  the  P.  W.  &  B.  R.  R. ,  and  our  under 
standing  of  this  is,  that'  we  are  to  grant  to  your  Compsny  the  free  use 
of  the  Phonoplex  system  of  telegraphy  already  installed  on  various 
portions  of  this  branch  of  your  road  for  the  period  of  three  years  from 
Jan.  1st,  1900.  In  addition  to  this,  we  are  to  furnish  your  Company  with 
batteries  and  renewals  therefore  amounting  in  total. ,to  §000.00  net, 
based  on  prices  which  they  now  pay,  one-half  (§300)  to  be  taken  out  in 
cells  complete,  and  the  remaining  one-half  ($300)cto  be  taken  out  in 
renewals  complete,  ffe, would  very  much  prefer  that  you  arrange  to  place 
your  orders  for  this  material  complete  immediately,  shipments  to  be  made 
to  any  points  that  you  may  indicate.  The  principle  reason  for  this  is, 
that  it  would  be  much  more  satisfactory  to  us,  and  doubtless,  in  the 
long  run  to  you,  if  the  matter  could  be  closed  up,  so  far  as  the  material 
is  concerned,  at  once,  rather  than  to  have  continuous  small  orders  sent 
in  from  time  to  time,  which  would  naturally  spread  the  deliveries  over,  a 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Type  "Q" Cell, 

CAPACITY  ISO  AMPERE  HOUR 


(2)  12/8/99 

P.  R.  R 


rather  indefinite  period  and  would  leave  the  account  open  on  our  books 
until  the  entire  amount  had  been  offset.  We  feel  that  after  due  con¬ 
sideration  you  will  agree  with  us  as  to  this,  as  no  doubt  your  Company 
would  prefer  to  thke  the  material  as  a  whole,  rather  than  to  have  credits 
open  on  our  books  indefinitely. 

Mr.  Edison  and  ourselves  are  very  glad  to  learn  that  this  J. 
little  difficulty  has  been  satisfactorily  arranged  to  all  concerned,  and 
we  can  only  trust  that  the  very  cordial  relations  that  have  heretofore 
existed  with  your  Company  will  continue. 

Yours  very  truly, 

(SIGNED)  W.  E.  GILMORE, 


weg/iww 

P.  s. 


Gen.  Manager. 


In  connection  with  the  ordering  of  the  entire  amount  of 
material  forward,  we  of  course  do  not  wish  you  to  understand  that  the 
order  should  be  placed  immediately,  as  of  course  if  you  desire  to 'take 
a  period  of  thirty  or  sixty  days  in  which  to  place  orders  for  the  total 
amount,  this  will  be  in  every  way  satisfactory  to  us. 


TT 


Hay  88*. 


Go  ahead  and  incorporate  the  "The  Raison  Mfg.  Co." 

Capital  $500,000.00.  teeued  full  paid  to  me  for  the  good  will  and 
business  of  what  is  now  known  as  Sdison  Mfg.,  except  that  part 
relating  to  the  moving  picture  business  along  with  the  transfer  to 
new  Company  is  tools  and  appliances  for  manufacturing  Raison 
lelande  Batteries,  also  pattern  and  tools  for  manufacturing  fan 
Motors  and  Medical  Apparatus,  together  will  all  stock  on  hand  and 
in  course  of  manufacture,  .'and  outstanding  accounts,  in  addition 
to  this  tlie  real  estate  now  belonging  to  me  opposite  the  laboratory 
also  all  office  furniture.  New  Company  assume  all  debts  of 
present  business. 

T  suppose  this  issue  of  the  stock,  full  paid,  will  be 
legal.  The  balance  sheet  is  just  out,  and  we  cleared  $51,000.00 
last  year  outside  of  moving  picture  business. 

The  new  Company  will  errect  large  Mfg.  Works  accross  the 
road  from  laboratory,  costing  about  $400,000.00,  to  manufacture 
all  kinds  of  machinery  and  apparatus,  both  Alectrical,  Mining  and 
otherwise  want  right  to  issue  bonds.  I  have  a  party  who  will  buy 
$400,000.00  bonds  at  par.  Bonds  t0  cover  all  the 


property  and 


h.  4h>. 

business,  good  will  etc.  and  all  new  property.  Cash  received 
from  bonds,  all  to  go  into  the  business.  Bonds  to  run  twelve 
years  interest  7  per  cent  per  annum,  after  three  years  and  for 
each  of  the  remaining  years  l/9th  of  the  bonds  shall  be  redeemed  at 
105  and  accrued  interest. 

You  will  please  draw  up  such  prooosed  bond  and  mortgage, 
so  I  can  submit  it  to  the  people  who  will  loan  any  time  from,  the 
1st  to  the  10th  of  May  will  answer  to  prepare  organization  and 
sale  to  Hew  Company  of  present  business  and  proposed  Bond  & 
Mortgage. 


Yours, 


C>  - 


Mr.  Thos.  A. Edison, 

Orange,  N.J, 

My  Dear  Sir:- 

In  accordance  with 
che  “Edison  Manufacturing  Compi 
f easlble  .Ho  make  the  bonds 


It  will  be  necessary!)  1 


>ur  instructions  I  have  incorporated 
The  plan  you  suggest  is  entirely 

lAi  kjfaJL  TrxJj.  UxXCrt^t- 

able  in  New  York  State.  That  of  course 
can  be  done  without  any  difficulty. 

I  enolose  an  offer  fonfthe  sale  of  the  business  for  you  to  sign, 
and  return,  then  I  will  h ajre  it  aocepted  by  the  Directors  of  the 
corporation.  Who  do  you/ wish  to  have  as  Directors  and  officers? 

Three Aare  necessary.  IJ  you  want  more  than  three,  you  can  have  as 
many  ^is  you  please. 

Yours  very  truly. 


m.  „  /fa.  UukJa  ltd 


! 

! 


430 


Annual  Report  for  1900 


p,  _ 

organized  under  the  Laws  of 

the  State  of 

New  Jersey. 

Directors,  Officers,  &c. 

Filed 

. 1QOO. 

Secretary  of  State. 


| 


Chapter  124  of  the 


f  1000. 


Annual  Report  by  a  Domestic  Corporation. 

The. . . Company. 

OrgattiztJi  and  RegistercQnnder  the  Laws  of  the  State  of  New  Jersey. 

The  corporation  above  named,  organized  and  registered  under  the  Laws  of  the  State  of  New  Jersey,  does  hereby 
make  the  following  report  in  compliance  with  the  provisions  of  an  act  of  the  Legislature  of  New  Jersey,  entitled  “An  Act 
Concerning  Corporations  (Revision  of  1896),”  and  the  various  acts  amendatory  thereof  and  supplemental  thereto. 


mu  vauuus  uuis  umcuuuiury  uiercoi  ana  supplemental  tnereto. 

. . 


SECOND — The  location  of  the  registered  office  is  at  No.  CoxyxtN.  lfaMikyJi^^  ^^ttriStHset, 

.LmdUnth mh  . . . 

is  the  agent  upon  \»liom  process  may  be  servi/d.  (_/ 

THIRD — The  character  of  the  business  . 

FOURTH — The  amount  of  the  authorized  capital  stock  is  .  The  amount  actually 

issued  and  outstanding  is  . . 

FIFTH— The  names  and  addresses  of  all  the  Directors  and  Officers  and  the  term  when  the  office  of  each  expires 
arc  as  follows : 


yiocit rxjs-3  CU  Jia 
fact looJc&  Ji  -t 


6  130  1 

\  6  '  /  ?  Of 

I  6  /<joi 


President,  ^krcAj  CO.  \ 

Vice  President,  fcUottm  ■  t&Uj-cy  4L.  j 


Treasurer,  CU&a^,  §■  j 

Secretary,  S.  j 

SIXTH — The  next  annual  meeting  of  the  stockholders  for  election  of  Directors  is  appointed  ti 

uC  rtf  qf _ 


SEVENTH  The  name  of  the  corporation  has  been  at  all  times  displayed  at  the  entrance  of  its  registered  office  in 
this  State,  and  the  corporation  has  kept  at  its  registered  office  in  this  State  a  transfer-book,  in  which  the  transfers 

of  stock  are  made,  and  a  stock-book,  containing  the  names  and  addresses  of  the  stockholders  and  the  number  of  shares 


t 


Mr.  Thomas  A. Edison, 

Orange,  N.J. 

Dear  Sirs- 


I  beg  to  report  that  I  saw  Mr.  Spoffard  and  gave  him  a  draft 
of  the  proposed  mortgage  and  alsoa  rough  memorandum  of  the  assets  of 
the  Company.  He  seemed  very  much  pleased  with  the  matte,  r,  and  Bald 
lhat  he  expected  to  see  Mr.  Villard  on  Monday.  Mr.  Spoffard  suggested 
that  the  propsed  amount  of  bonds  was  smaller  than  might  eventually  be 
needed/and  suggested  a  clause  in  the  mortgage  authorising  the  issue 
of  additional  bonds  up  to  Borne  very  large  amount  to  be  specified,  upon 
the  Trustee  being  .satisfied,  that  additional  plant  was  needed  for  the 
business  and^  money  raised  on  the  bonds  was  to  go  into  the  plant. 

I  suggested  that  the  right  to  issue  additional  bands  of  thiB  character 
might  interfere  with  the  sale  of  the  $400,000.  of  bonds  we  put  out 
first.  He  said  that  might  be  the  case,  but  thought  if  the  additional 
bonds  were  to  be  Issued  only  to  75  per  oent  of  the  increased  value 
of  the  plant,  it  would  not  interfere  with  the  selling  of  the  first 
issue  of  bonds.  He  evidently  is  very  much  impressed  with  the  possi¬ 
bilities  of  the  Manufacturing  Company  and  said  that  if  new  matters  came 
up,  as  they  are  apt  to  continually,  you  might  find  that  the  $400,000. 
was  nothing  compared  with  what  would  be  needed  to  establish  an  adequate 
plant.  He  said  he  would  send  me  word  as  soon  as  he  saw  Mr.  Villard 
and  in  the  meantime  I  would  confer  with  you  in  regard  to  this  plan  of 
having  the  right  to  issue  additional  bonds. 
nkoture  Yours  very  truly. 


'  -pin*.  '  '  _ 

Mr.  Randolph.:  \ 

1  Note  attached  letters,  which  explain  .themselves. 

I  believe  that  you  keep  these  letters  until  Mr-;'  Rogue  returns 
and  then^he  makes  notation  in  a  hook  that  you  have  for  the  purpose. 
I  want  to  discuss  the  matters  with  him,  particularly  the  last 
paragraph,  when  he  gets  hack,,  so.  keep  them  all  together. 

5/16/1900.'  W.  T5.  -G. 

A-l  :  .  /'  :  -  •  : 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Chicago,  May  11th,  1900. 

Mr.  W.  E.  Giimoro, 

Gen.  Mgr.  Edison  Mfg.  Co.,  j 

Orange,  II. J . 

Dear  Sir:- 


,  i'RsceiylD' 

MAV.  -A4.-1H00 
\Ans&. .  „  > 


I  have  your  letter  of  May  7th,  also  Mr.  Merhew’s 
letter.  When  this  circuit  was  installed  I  did  not  think  it 
would  last  very  long.  I  do  not  think  the  business  in  that  part 
of  the  country  warranted  it,  excepting  probably  two  or  three 
months  in  the  fall.  I  think,  however,  that  Mr.  Merrfhew  will 
soon  find  another  place  for  the  instruments. 

There  is  no  way  for  us  to  know  when  a  set  of  instruments 
is  transferred  to  some  other  place,  excepting  trusting  to  the 
honesty  of  the  officials  to  notify  us. 

Some  few  years  before  you  came  to  Orange  Mr.  Edison  and 
Mr.  Tati  discussed  the  policy  of  selling  the  instruments  out¬ 
right  and  abolishing  the  royalty,  charging  onough  for  the 
instruments  to  cover  the  royalty  for  the  life  of  the  patent.  If 
I  remember  right  Mr.  Edison  decided  to  stick  to  the  old  plan, 
saying  if  lie  got  the  money  in  a  lump  ho  would  spend  it  too 
quickly,  or  something  to  this  effect.  The  matter  was  then 
dropped.  I  think,  however,  that  if  the  royalty  was  abolished 
and  the  instruments  sold  outright  as  proposed  above  there 
would  bo  more  circuits  installed.  Railroads  and  telegraph 
pooplo  dont  like  the  royalty  plan. 

Yours  truly. 


-I- 


[ENCLOSURE] 


JAMES  MERRIHEW, 

Gen'l  Sup(. 


Western  Union  Telegraph  Company, 

SOUTHERN  DIVISION. 

New  York, _ May_.4/_iao_Q. 


'Ste'cEiyfft 

Edison  Mfg.  Co.  |  - 

Orange,  N.  J. 

Dear  Sirs; 

I  have  just  been  advised  by  our  Supt.  at  Richmond,  Va. 
Mr.  J.  B.  Tree,  that  on  January  1st,  1900,  he  abandoned  the  phono- 
plex  circuit  betn  Atlanta,  Ga.  and  Greenville,  S.  C.  and  the  same 
has  been  dismantled.  This  circuit  will  not  be  resumed. 

Yopfs  truly 


Gen.  Supt. 


.490 


the  cost 


Referring  to  the  attached,  I  wish  you  would  give  me 
and  selling  prices  of  the  phonoplex  instruments.  I  .refer  to  the  in¬ 
struments  themselves.  It  is  riot  so  necessary  to  give  me  the  "battery- 
cost  at  present.  I  want  to  take  this  matter  up  with.  Mr.  Edison. 


5/16/1900.  ■  _  .  Jf.  E.  G. 

Enc-I  c_  ’ 

-  /o.<i~o - 1-0:0 


Your  attention  'Is 'called  to  the  fact  that  the  phono- 
plex  instruments  are  desired  hy  the  Signal  Corps  for  experi¬ 
mental  uses  in  connection  with  military  operations  in  the  j 

Pliilippines,  and  it  is  hoped. that  your  company,  recognizing  i 

the  peculiar  condition' of  affairs,  will  he  willing  to  sell  a  -  I 
number  of  sets  outright  to  this  office. 

I  shall  he  glad  to  agree  that  these  Instruments 
-shall  noj:  be  used  except  on  military  telegraph  lines  under 
the  Signal  Corps  of  the  Army,  so  that  you  will  in  no  way  come 
into  competition  v/ith  leased  instruments. 

Much  as  I  should  he  glad  to  experiment  with  these 
instruments  it  v/ill  not  be  possible  to  do  so  under  the  conditions 


[ATTACHMENT] 


3. 

mentioned  by  you.  Of  course  it  is  expected  that  there  will 
he  an  additional  price  paid,  which  could  he  considered  as  a 
life  royalty  for  the  instruments. 

Trusting  that  you  will  he  able  to  favor  the  Signal 
Corps  in  this  matter,  X  am 

Very  respectfully, 


Brigadier  General, 
Chief  Signal  Offic 


HOWARD  W.  HAVES, 


Mr* •  Thomas  A. Edison, 
Orange,  N.J. 


I  "beg  to  acknowledge  reoeipl 
enclosing  your  check  to  my  order  for  $,] 
of  stook  of  the  Edison  Manufacturing  C< 


Orange,  N.  «T. ,  May  85),  15)00. 


A.  W.  Greeley,  Boq.  , 

Brig.  General, 

Chief  Signal  Offioer  U.  S.  A. ,  ''  ;/ 

War  Department,,  Washington,  B.c. 

Dear  Sir:" 

,  We  are  in  receipt  of  your  favor  of  the  10th  inet,.,  haying 
reference  ,to  the  introduction  of  the  Bdison  Phonoplex  system  of  tele¬ 
graphy  foe  foreign  service  and  particularly  for  experimental  use  in, 
connection  with  Military  operations  in  the  ■Philippines.  We  hRve  .dis¬ 
cussed  this  quite  fully  with  Mr.  Bdison,  and  he  1b  willing  to  make  an 
exception,  in  this  particular  oase, .although  heretofore  the  Bystem  has 
never  Been  introduced  exoept  on  the  lines  indioated  in  our  communica¬ 
tion  to  Hr.  Reber,  dated  April  88th.  He  0n  willing  to  sell  the  Govern¬ 
ment  two  (Complete  sets  of  Phonoplex  instruments,  with  condensers  and. 
hatterleB,  together  with  two  extra, sets  of  renewals  for  the  hatterio’s, 
at  a  net  prioe  of  Bight.  Hundred  Dollars  ($800),  on  the  conditions  men¬ 
tioned  in., your  1  et ter-- that  , same  are  , to,  he  used  only  in  connection,  with 


military  .telegraph  lines  coming  under  the  Signal  Corps  of  the  army.  .. 
You  of  course  understand  that  Mr... Bdison  is  making  thiB  exo option  for 


cm 


a.  w.  a. 


(?.) 


5/P.9/1900. 


to  make  payment  on  a  royalty  basis. 

Of  course  this  covers  only  the  Instruments  and  the  use  of  same 
during  the  life  of  the  patentn  and  does  not  oover  the  nervines  of  expert. 
Should  you  deolde  to  take  up  and  experiment  with  the  apparatus,  our* 
suggestion  would  be  that  the  Department  appoint  a  competent  telegrapher 
who  will  £e  thoroughly  Instructed  by  our  expert,  Mr.  w.  S.  T.ogues,  as 
we  feel  that  the  Government  would  prefer  to  hRve  the  installation  and 
experimenting  carried  on  by.  Its  own  employees  rather  than  an  outsider. 

Trusting  that  we  will  have  the  pleasure  of  hearing  from  you  further 
as  to  thiB  matter,  we  are,  .  ; v.. 

Yours  very  truly, 


WjCr/T. W 


General  Manager. 


Referring  to  the  attachd  correspondence ,  which  fully  explains 
itself,  proceed  at  once  to  get  ready  all  of  the  material  mentioned. 

Do  not  have  it  packed,  as  Logue  may  want  to  give  instructions  as  to 
what  shall  go  in.  I  have  written  him  to-day  as  to  this,  hut  the 
material  can  he  gotten  ready,  and  it  wants  to  he  carefully  inspected 
to  see  that  it  is  satisfactory  in  every  way. 

Of  course  as  these  are  important  papers,  they  should  all  he  filed 
away  in  the  safe  hy  Mr.  Westee  when  you  are  through  with  them. 
6/6/1900.  w.  E.  G. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


plan?  ^gpDrtttUWt, 

SIGNAL  OFFICE, 

June  2,  1900. 

|  Mr.  V/.  33.  Gilmore, 

|  General  Manager,  Edison  Mfg'r.  Co.,  , 

j  Orange,  New  Jersey. 

Referring  to  your  letter  of  May  29,  1900 
honor  to  advise  you  that  I  have  directed  Captain  Eugene  0. 
Fechet,  Disbursing  Officer  of  the  Signal  Corps,  to  purchase 
two  complete  sets  the  EdiBon  Phonoplex  instruments,  with  con¬ 
densers  and  batteries,  together  with  two  extra  sets  of  re¬ 
newals  for  the  batteries,  for  the  sum  of  eight  hundred  dol¬ 
lars. 


F.M.  8879. 


These  instruments  are  purchased  through  the  courtesy 
of  Mr.  Edison  under  the  conditions  mentioned  in  my  letter 
i.  °f  May  10,  1900,  and  with  the  distinct  understanding  that  1 

they  were  to  be  used  only  in  connection  with  military  tel-  j 

j  egraph  lines  under  the  Signal  Corps  of  the  Army.  \ 

ThiB  covers  only  the  instruments  and  the  use  of  the  i 

same  during  the  life  of  the  patents,  and  does  not  cover 
the  services  of  an  expert.  ;| 

Captain  Samuel  Reber,  Signal  corps,  U.  s.  Army,  now 
serving  at  Governor's  Island,  New  York  Harbor,  has  been  j 

directed  to  consult  through  you  with  Mr.  V/.  s.  Logue.  [ 

I  The  Chief  signal  Officer  of  the  Array  would  prefer  j  I 

/  to  have  the  installation  made  by  one  of  your  experts,  but 

\  i  -  Mi  ao t± cabre^^fn^ylaTr^q the^^fac^t b  that  _  ^  j  ? 


[ENCLOSURE] 


-2- 

'  the  instruments  purchased  are  to  be  used  in  the  Philippine 
Islands  by  Lieutenant  Colonel  James  Allen,  Signal  Corps,  who 
is  faraili&r  with  the  principles  involved. 

Possibly  the  Corps  would  like  to  purchase  additional 
instruments  on  the  same  terms  for  the  use  of  the  Signal  Corps 
should  these  work  satisfactorily  over  the  military  lines  in 
the  Philippines. 

Appreciating  the  courtesy  and  considerate  action  of. 
both  Mr.  Edison  and  yourself,  I  am. 


Very  truly  yours. 


Brigadier  General,  \ 

Chief  Signal  Officer,  U. 3. Army. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


fywkp&,  gieprtmieit  d  ike  tet 

OFFICE  OF  THE  SIGNAL  OFFICER, 

Governor’s  Island,  flew  York  City.  June  4th,  1900. 


to.  W.  E.  Gilmore,  General  Manager, 
Edison  Mfg.  company, 

Orange,  N.J. 


Sir: 


f  f'fc'C  EIVED'; 


JIJN.  rf-lbOO 


I  have  been  informed  by  the  Chief  Signal  Of¬ 
ficer  that  an  order  for  two  sets  of  Edison  Phonopl&Ws  lias  been 
placed  with  you.  I  would  request  that  when  ready  the  instruments 
be  delivered  on  Governor's  Island, and  will  be  glad  to  see  to.  Logue 
whenever  it  is  convenient  for  him  to  call  at  my  office. 


Very  reg? 


BP&rfTtilly , 


Captain  Signal  Corps,  U.  S.  V., 
Signal  Officer. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Pm*  iptjmrtnmtt, 

SIGNAL  OFFICE, 


G 

Mr.  W.  E.  Gilmore, 

General  Manager,  Edison  Manufacturing  Co 
Orange,  N.  J. 

Sir: 


/ h  ZCFTvFfry 

i 


Under  date  of  June  2d  the  Chief  Signal  Officer,  U.S.Army,  ad¬ 
vised  you  that  he  had  decided  to  place  an  order  for  two  complete 
sets  of  the  Edison  Phonoplex  instruments,  with  condensers  and  bat¬ 
teries,  together  with  two  extra  sets  of  renewals  for  the  batteries, 
aggregating  in  total  the  sum  of  §800.00.  Accordingly',  I  now  place 
the  order  with  you. 

The  matter  of  receiving  the  instruments,  and  providing  for 
their  proper  packing  and  shipment,  has  been  entrusted  to  Captain 
Samuel  Reber,  Signal  Officer,  Department  of  the  East,  Governor*s 
Island,  New  York  Harbor. 

You  will  please  acknowledge  receipt  of  this  order,  and  advise 
this  office  how  soon  the  instruments  will  be  ready  for  delivery. 

By  direction  of  the  Chief  Signal  Officer. 

.  Very  respectfully. 


Cap ta in^S ignal  off icer.USV. , 
Disbursing  Officer. 


I  have  the  honor  to  acknowl edge  the  receipt 
of  your  letter  of  June  6th,  and  would  request  that  you  ship  the 
instruments  to  me  whenever  they  are  readr/,  aid  on  Mr.  Logue 's 
return  from  the  west  I  shall  be  glad  to  oee  him. 


return? 


Will  you  kindly  advise  me  when  he  wi  11  probably 


fully, 

Captain, Signal  Corps,  U.S.V., 


Orange,  IT.  ,T. ,  .Tune  3.1,  1900. 


The  Bradstreet  Oo. , 


;,I  beg  to  advise; you  t ha£.  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Oo.,  here¬ 
tofore  owned  hy  Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison,  was  organised  \mder  the  laws  of 
the  State,  .of  New  Jersey  wi’jth,  a  capital  of.  $500, 000  under  date,  of  May. 
8th,  1900 

The  .Off  icers  of  the  Oompany  are:  .  .  /...j 

.***••  President,.  ,  •  Thomfts  A.  Edison  . ,-1-4 

Vioe  Pros.'  fc'Gen.  JJgr. ,  V.  E.  Gilmore 
*»  Secretary  ,&  Treasurer,  •  .T.  P.  Randolph.  . 

Disregarding  the  capital  v'stook  entirely,  I  hog  to  give  you.  below 
a  statement  of  the  assets  jand  liabilities  as  shown  by  the  books  May.  8th, 


*.7* ,  •  •  :  ,  ASSETS.  •  . 

Oashi.and  Aooounts  and  Notes  Receivable.  <.§61 ,  448 .18 
Real  Estate  Investments  and  Buildings,  29,880.97 
MRterialB— raw,  finished  and  in  process 

of  manufacture,  >  37^484.74 

•  •  :***;*  ••  -•  •  Total  \  • 

EIABtri'TiES.  -  ,  > 

Aooounts  Payable  ..  --<  §87,518.67 

Mortgage  on  Real : Estate  9.000.00 

■  •  r.i.-v.  •  Total,  •  : - - - — 

>,  Total  Assets  070^.  liabilities, 


(2) 


Type  "Q"Cell, 


The  JVradstreet  Co. 


6/n/xood. 


All  the  oapital  stock  has  boon  issued  to  Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison 
and  oovers  good-will  and  all  right,  title  and  interest  in  and  to  the 
business  of  the  old  Company,  together  with  certain  patents  and  patent 
riehtB. 

Yours  Tory  t  ruly, 


tog/iw  ... 


...'..vice  Pres.  &  General  Manager. 


'RECEIVED'! 

dUN,-l.;H»OU  i 

^^•rrs;  1 


Chicago,  June  11th,  1900. 


Mr.  W.  E.  Gilmore, 

Gen  .  Mgr.  Edison  Mfg.  Co., 

Orange,  N.J. 

Dear  Sir:- 

On  my  return  to  Chicago  I  find  your  letter  of  June 
6th  in  reference  to  the  Signal  Corps  ordering  the  Phonoplex 
instrument. 

I  attach  a  copy  of  my  letter  to  Capt.  Heb^r.  1  do  not 
think  there  is  any  doubt  about  my  going  baok^thcf  latter  part  of 
June. 

The  enclosed  note  from  Mr.  Barclay  will  tell  you  thj 
Phonoplex  circuit  between  Seattle  and  Victoria  will  not\l 
needed.  There  is  quite  a  lot  of  stuff  out  there  and  I  wi] 
arrange  with  Barclay  to  let  it  remain  until  I  oan  see  you.V 

Referring  again  to  Phonoplex  in  the  Philippines,  I  this 
it  would  be  a  good  idea  if  you  would  write  Capt.  Reber  and  s 
him  impossible  for  a  diagram  of  the  wires  that  they  expect  t(> 
equip  with  the  Phonoplex.  This  information  we  should  have  so 
we  will  know  what  to  send,  that  is,  if  there  is  any  extra  condensers 
needed.  As  I  understand  from  your  letter,  the  price  quoted  is 
only  for  the  terminal  instruments.  It  will  be  too  bad  to  have 
th6^  stuff  go  there  short  anything.  Of  course  I  aannot  go.  When 
I  lalkVd'  with  Col.  Allen  in  Washington  he  knew  very  little  about 


W'.E.S.  -2- 


the  Phonoplex. 

The  following  is  list  of  instruments  that  it  will  be 
necessary  to  send  for  two  terminal  offices: 

'Phones.  ^  y 
Transmitters. 

Magnetic  Coils.  S 
Choke  Coils.  vC 
Rheostates.  / 

Keys . 

Horns.  ^ 

2.5  M.P.  Condensers^ 

1.5  *  "  "  / 

R.  Cells  of  battery  complete 
R.  Renewals.  S 

This  covers  all  that  you  agreed  to  furnish  in  your 


I  go  back  to  Indiana  to-night. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


If  ours 


Orange,  N.  J.,  .Tune  ISt.h,  1900. 


Samuel  Reber,  Esq., 

Captain  Signal  Corps,  IT.  S.  V.  Signal  Officers, 

Governor's  Island, 

New  York  City. 

Rear  Sir:- 

Wil;h  further  reference  to  the  Phonoplex  outfits  for  use  in  the 
Phillipino  Islands,  would  it  be  possible  for  you  to  furni sh  ua  with  a 
diagram  of  the  circuit  which  is  to  be  equipped  with  these  instruments? 
Also  can  you  give  us  the  approximate  length  of  same  and  advise  us  if 
there  is  to  be  any  intermediate  offices? 

You  understand  of  course  that  only  sufficient  instruments  have  been 
ordered  to  equip  two  terminal  offices.  In  the  event  of  there  being  any 
intermediate  Morse  offices  in  the  circuit  it  will  be  necessary  to  supply 
an  additional  condenser  for  each  office  to  bridge  the  circuit . 

As  our  Mr.  Logite  has  already  advised  you,  he  will  return  East,  about, 
July  1st, and  will  then  take  the  matter  up  with  you  personally. 

However,  we  should  like  to  have  in  our  hands  if  possible  before  that  date, 
all  of  the  available  data  concerning  the  proposed  oircuit  so  that,  we  may 


ITo.  P.t  !5.  R. 

have  the  instruments  in  readiness  and  prevent  any  unnecessary  delay. 

Yours  very  truly. 


fie nor al  Manager . 


Signal  Officer, 


IfMfi:#.  gjepi’tmjeit 


®f  ill  tent, 


OFFICE  OF  THE  SIGNAL  OFFICER, 


I  have  the  honor  to  request  that  the  Phonoplox 
instruments,  recently  ordered,  he  shipped  here  as  soon  as  practica¬ 
ble,  as  it  is-  desired  by  the  Chief  Signal  Officer  to  have  them 
tested  and  shipped  to  the  Philippines  with  the  lest  possible  delay. 

Very  respectfully,  — . 

Captain,  Signal  corps,  tf.  S.  V,’, 
Signal  Officer.. 


«  *  6/27/1900.  ‘  ^ 

Kane,  Morse: 

We  will  receive  a  Government  order  for  two  terminal  sets 
of  Phonoplex  Instruments  as  follows: 


2  phones 
2  transmitters 
2  rheostats 
2  keys 

2  magnetic  colls 
„  2  choke  coils 

2  horns 

2  2-1/2  M.  7.  Condensers 

2  1-1/2  H.  7.  « 

The  condensers  are  in  stock.  Please  hare  them  tested  mid  set-  aside 


ready  for  Mr. Toj 


will  inspect  themwhen  ho  returns  from  the  West. 


Orange,  17.  J.,  (June  3?>th,  1900.  \ 

Samuel  Reber,  Eaq.^ 

Capt .  Signal  Girards,  0.  S.  V., 

Signal  Officer, 

Governor* a  Island,  H.  Y.  City. 

Dear  Sir:- 

v?e  beg  to  acknowledge  receipt  of  your  favor  of  Jane  ?.3d  respect¬ 
ing  the  plionoplex  instruments  recently  ordered. 

Owing  to  the  fact  !bh{>.t  this  is  the  initial  order  received  from  the 
Government  for  phonoplex  outfits,  and  also  taking  into  consideration  the 
fact  that  they  are  to  b'd'  exported  to  the  Phillipine  Islands,  we  deem  it 
advisable  to  have  our  ijjrv  Rogue  personally  examine  the  outfits  and  approve 
of  then  before  shipmoJ$! ■ 

7/e  have  to-day  received  a  telegram  from  Mr.  Rogue  advising  that  he 
will  be  with  us  Monday  morning .  He  will  arrange  to  call  upon  you  without 
delay t  in  fact  he  iff  coriing  East  at  this  time  especially  to  look  after 
this  order.  All  of  the, -instruments, and  the  battery  material  also,  are 
now  ready  and  we  will  taalce  shipment  Just  as  soon  as  the  inspection  has 
taken  placo.  At; the  present  moment  we  know  ef  no  reason  why  the  entire 

order  cannot  be  pieced  Vin'.your  hands  during  the  owning  week. 

This  we  trust  will  be  entirely  satisfactory  to  you,  and  beg  to  remain, 

/'■  i  Yours  very  truly,  ... 

1  mirm  iwwAanmim  go. 

PJ3R 


JEGsTF 


EDISON  MANUFACTURING  COMPANY, 

W.  E.  Gilmore,  General  Manager, 
Orarge,  N.J. 

Deal*  Rir:- 


July  18th,  1900. 

i  h-lJeiveo^ 

JUL-sa-jsoo  j 


Acknowledging  receipt  of  yours  of  the  12th  inst.  addressed  to 
C.  A.  Tinker,  Gen.Supt.  of  this  Company,  I  beg  to  say  that  the  proposi¬ 
tion  therein  contained  as  to  royalty  on  Edison  Phonoplex  System  of  Tele¬ 
graphy,  to  take  effect  as  of  July  1st,  1900,  is  hereby  accepted,  the 
rates  therein  named  to  be  substituted  for  the  rates  specified  in  the 
contract  of  January  17th,  1898,  between  the  Western  Union  Telegraph  Com¬ 
pany  of  the  first  part,  and  Thos.  A.  Edison  of  Llewellyn  Park,  N.J. ,  of’ 
the  second  part. 


Truly  yours. 


President. 


1900.  Exhibitions  (D-00-12) 

This  folder  contains  correspondence  concerning  industrial  and 
electrical  expositions  in  Paris  (1900)  and  in  Buffalo,  New  York  (1901). 

All  of  the  documents  have  been  selected. 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 

Orange,  New  Jersey, 

Dear  Sir: 

I  am  pleased  to  inform  you  that  the  Certificate  of  Ad¬ 
mission  number  for  your  exhibit  is  29250.  This  number,  you .under¬ 
stand,  is  to  appear  on  all  shipping  labels  that  are  attached  to 
cases  containing  different  parts  of  your  exhibit.  Kindly  take 
particular  pains  to  have  the  numerals  plainly  marked  on  these 
labels  before  the  same  are  attached  to  cases,  and  greatly  oblige. 
Very  truly  yours, 


Director  of  Machinery  &  Electricity. 


2r lubii-o  /)  1 


Orange,  New  Jersey, 


1<U^ 


The  Patent  Office  is  preparing  an  exhibit  fgr^ftie  Fan- 
American  Exposition  to  be  opened  at  Buffalo  abfyftApril  Jtefttjn' 3,901, 
and  since  it  is  desirable  to  convey  to  the  pubXilc  the^importanceS 
of  our  patent  system,  the  latest  advances  in  the  arts  and  sciences 
should  be  illustrated. 

Recognizing  the  great  strides  that  have  been  taken  by 
you,  and  the  interest  the  public  have  manifested  in  models  of  your 
patents  at  past  expositions,  I  write  to  ask  if  you  would  be  willing 
to  furnish  an  exhibit  relating  to  such  inventions,  as  would  in 
your  opinion,  be  of  general  interest. 

Should  you  be  willing  to  oblige  the  office  in  this  re¬ 
spect,  such  exhibit  would  be  accepted  with  the  understanding  of 
course,  that  it  be  preserved  intact,  and  returned  to  you,  if  de¬ 
sired,  in  good  condition  after  the  exposition  shall  have  closed. 

Very  respectfully. 


Commissioner. 


Department  of  tbe  Interior, 


Thomas  A.  Edison  Esq., 
Orangey  New  Jersey, 

Dear  Sir:- 


I  regret  to  learn  through  your  letter  of  the  14th  inst. , 
that  it  will  be  inconvenient  for  you  to  make  an  exhibit  in  connec¬ 
tion  with  this  office  at  Buffalo  next  year.  Owing  to  the  inter¬ 
est.  the  public  manifested  in  youn/patents,  as  before  stated,  X 
had  hoped  you  would  be  able  to /show  working  models  of  such  of  your 
inventions  as  would  constitute  an  attractive  exhibit  among  the  many 
other  fine  displays  I  expert  to  be  furnished  by  other  inventors. 

i  slymld  favorably  reconsider  this  matter,  I 
will  be  gl^d  to  reservp  the  necessary  space. 

I  am,  very  respectfully. 


Commissioner. 


Orange,  Hew  Jersey. 

Dear  Sir: 

In  reference  to  yar  award  and  those  recently  made  to 
some  of  y®r  competitors,  I  have  just'  been  discussing  the  sub¬ 
ject  with  your  Mr.  Kaiser  and  desire  to  confirm,  by  this  means, 
my  conversation,  by  stating  that  during  the  operation  of  the 
class  and  group  juries  it  was  decided  that  all  phonographs 
should  be  examined  by  the  jury  of  class  Z6:,  under  which  class 
your  award  was  granted.  ■ 

It  appears  that  since  the  adjournment  of  the  class 
and  group  juries  one  of  your  competitors  has  taken  an  appeal 
to  the  Superior  Jury  and  a  delegation  thereof,  asking  for  an 
award  in  Class  15  "Musical  Instruments"  and  has  secured,  in  - 
collectivity,  a  Grand  Prix  in  connectimwith  an  allied  company. 

In  my  opinion  neither  one  of  these  two  concerns  could 
have  secured  a  grand  prix  in  either  class  had  they  stood  alone, 
and  besides  which  I  assume  that  considerable  local  influence'  has 
been  brought  to  bear  upon  the  delegation  of  the  superior  jury, 
(which  is  composed  of  four  Preach  members  to  one  foreigner)  to  -  ; 
have  the  award  made  in  the  grade  of  grand  prix. 


Mr.  Thomas  A  Edison  -2- 


No  doubt  it  is  all  perfectly  regular  but  it  appears 
strange  that  if  could  be  possible  for  the  same  class  of  instru- 
ments  to  be  judged  by  two  different  juries  or  delegations  of  th 
jury.  X  am  sorry  to  report  this  situation  but  we  have  done  all 
we  could  to  prevent  it. 

Yours  very  truly, 

Director  cf.wachinery  &  Electricity 


1900.  Mining  -  General  (D-00-13) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to 
mining  and  ore  milling.  Included  are  letters  from  the  North  American 
Transportation  &  Trading  Co.,  in  which  Edison  invested,  and  an  accompanying 
series  of  notes  by  Edison  regarding  gold  mining  in  Nome,  Alaska.  Also 
included  is  a  series  of  letters  and  reports  by  geologist  Martin  Schwerin,  who 
was  hired  by  Edison  to  prospect  for  ores  in  northern  Michigan. 

Approximately  10  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  Among 
the  documents  not  selected  are  letters  enclosing  ore  samples  for  analysis, 
requests  for  information  about  ore  processing,  and  price  quotes  relative  to 
drilling  through  limestone. 


WAR  DEPARTMENT. 
OFFICE  OF  CHIEF  SIGNAL  OFFICER. 
WASHINGTON. 


January  4,  1900. 


Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison, 

Edison's  Laboratory, 

Orange,  N.  J. 

My  dear  sir: 

On  November  21,  1899,  Mr.  George  Chittenden  sent  you  by 
express  a  sack  of  iron  gold  ore,  shipped  from  Florence,  Arizona, 
to  your  laboratory  at  Orange.  Will  you  please  advise  me  by 
return  mail  if  this  sack  has  come  to  hand,  and  if  so  the  result 
of  your  examination  of  the  same.  Ypu  will  please  recall  that 
your  report  to  me  on  the  first  sample  sent  you  was  satisfactory  \ 
and  you  requested  ithdtyaularger  sample  be  sent  you,  and  it  was 
in  compliance  with  your  request  that  the  sample  was  sent  from 
Florence  in  November.  The  sample  1  believo  weighed  between 
35  and  4q  pounds. 


Yours  very  truly. 


Sr 


Address; 

Major  Eugene  Fechet, 

War  Department,  Signal  Office, 
Washington,  D.C. 


!_iuO|'C 


■l«W 


Xu 


y/K 

0"! 


UvJ>  Crf'L  (fcZ?  j^J 

UJ  '^cxjcJL c^dj  -|p^  oM*^r  Sea 


jl 

Jt-ar[^,^ry  c^A^c^J  I 

—  Ttliss 


Jj^(\^<^<J?~  ^?- 
.  j^JL  c,H/Ltw 

[,-Le- 


i’  l^e*. 


_  t'0-l»v*-fi' 

<*£ 


‘ft*  *D  fl-Qur  i 


-CL/ 


I  ”"  <^- 

A.J  Cr^CvtJ  s'3^-  04f 

6uv  t  liXi>  o-o  cJUjOssS cl-o  to  O~o%  t 


l4-Ct  *“  loCeJL 


,  QW-'tX Lc^~  '•""' 


<rru>  &ac^j'W  1  .  ^  1 

t^u  ic-  -  L^yh^JS 


^  3|  ^ f*  1 Lt 


^  /  ; 

y.r.lst^T  'V'a,uw-C— 


5J 


r&  su*  vvo  cX<-  f  C-irvtC^W  Lvn^W 

Uj  tfcr  S  v^tzzZo,  ^  ^  ^ 

tj  lUv,  (s,,ckH^.^^'dr 

Jt—  ■  .  .  .  -  ■«esv(!  a-fc-d-Cv^—n  trl'  ^ 7 


U  uL  -i—fe  ^  ■ ^7_ 

.^w-  ^  a‘  ‘*'£“'~  .  • 

ri. 

C-p'”'2'  C'<". 


,<?<:>  ~~[vXz 


:srti^  4 


iMt^w^11^. uo  W. 


The  Colorado  Midland  Railway  Co. 


Denver,  Colorado,,  .February^ 


My  dear  Edison:- 

You  understand  the  reasoil1  I  have  not  answered  your  letter 
of  January  26th  has  been  on  account  of  my  absence  in  the  East. 


f '  \ 

as  on  I 


I  have  thought  it  best  to  give  your  questions  and  the  answers 
on  a  separate  sheet.  These  answers  you  will  understand  are  not  made  up 
by  myself,  because  1  am  not  an  expert  in  the  business;  but  they  have  been 
taken  in  hand  by  the  gentleman  who  has  been  interested  with  me  through¬ 
out  the  whole  correspondence,  and  who  is  personally  familiar  with  the 
leadville  situation  and  the  zinc  question  in  general.  Therefore,  you 
will  see  they  they  are  as  reliable  as  it  is  possible  to  make  them. 

I  have  not  given  you  the  analysis  of  the  coal,  because  we  can 
get  any  quality  you  would. require.  Of  course,  the  coal  varies  in 
different  sections  of  the  State,  but  this  is  a  matter  which  can  very 
easily  be  settled  if  it  is  necessary  to  have  special  coal. 


Referring  to  the  conversation  I  had  with  you  in  Milan  as  regards 
your  wanting  some  of  the  poorest  quality  of  ore.  We  will  arrange  to  send 
you  some  next  week  from  J.eadville  by  express.  We  will  send  you  four 
sacks,  which  will  equal  about  the  barrel  you  refer  to.  This  ore  will  be 
taken  from  different  localities,  so  you  may  know  the  general  run.  We  will 
see  that  the  sacks  are  marked,  and  if,  in  making  your  tests,  you  will 
keep  record  according  to  the  marks,  we  will  then  be  able  to  locate  mines 
from  which  the  ore  is  taken.  X  have  specially  fisked  that  the  poorest 
samples  be  selected,  as  you  request. 

If  there  is  anything  further  you  desire,  do  not  hesitate  to 
call  on  me,  and  I  will  procure  it  for  you. 


I  might  add  that  there  is  a  great  deal  of  interest  being  taken 
by  the  mine  owners  at  Leadville,  and  from  information  I  have  been  able 
to  get,  a  great  deal  of  money  is  being  expended  in  making  tests  for  the 
treatment  of  this  zinc  ore,  so  if  you  can  expedite  the  matter,  it  will  be 
of  great  advantage  and  practically  control  the  situation. 


Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison, 


Orange,  New  Jersey. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Purchase  raw  ore 

Yes,  or  acquire  by  lease  or  purchase  a  right  to  mine  the  ore. 

Crush  to  proper  size  separate  lead  and  iron  pyrities  as  clean 
as  possible,  sell  to  local  smelter. 

Yes . 

Reeoncentrate  zinc  iron  to  raise  zinc  and  diminish  iron  below 
say  6  per  cent  and  strip  zinc  to  and  iron  to 

local  smelters. 

Yes,  and  to  ship  the  zinc  concentrates  to  Joplin,  Mo.,  Pitts¬ 
burg,  Kansas,  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  Mineral  Point,  Wis.,  Swansea, 
Wales  and  Belgium.  To  the  last  two^pamed  points  via  ships 
from  Galveston,  and  as  the  concentrates  are  now  going  from 
Leadville  via  that  route.  The  iron  and  lead  from  this  ore 

to  be  shipped  to  local  smelters. 

What  will  be  average  assay  (approximately)  of  the  ores  bought 
up  to  1000  tons  daily. 

Average  assay  approximately  of  the  ores  brought  up  to  1,000 
tons  daily  for  rave  ore  coming  from  mines: 

6  ®fco  15  oz.  silver 
5/100  to  15/100  gold 
7% to  15%  lead 

10%  to  18%  '  iron 

18.5  to  37%  zinc 

The  metallic  contents  in  the  ore  changes  as  found  in  different 
mines  in  Leadville  and  other  points  in  Colorado,  also  in  the 
state  of  Utah. 

Is  there  a  large  supply.  How  many  years  could  mill  be  supplied 
at  this  rate. 

Yes.  500  to  1,000  tons  per  day  for  many  years  to  come.  Pour 
mines  at  Leadville  have  about  100,000  tons  of  this  character  of 
ore  in  sight,  and  development  of  these  mines  will  show  still 
larger  tonnage,  and  about  115,000  tons  of  tailings  similar  to 
samples  sent  you  can  be  had  by  purchase  or  lease,  most  probably 
by  lease. 

If  not  to  be  purchased,  is  it  intention  to  acquire  right  to 
min^. 

Both  by  purchase  and  by  right  to  mine  by  lease  or  purchase  of 
the  mines. 

Are  samples  sent  me  average  quality  or  richer  than  usual. 

The  sample  of  tailings  sent  you  is  the  average  as  to  tonnage 
referred  to  in  query  Mo.  6.  The  sample  of  crude  ore  sent  is 
some  higher  in  zinc  and  very  much  lower  in  iron  and  silica  than 
the  average  of  the  ore  that  is  now  and  can  be  produced  at 
. Leadville. 

frffey*rTrw  Is  there_no_obj actions  to  fine  concentrates  by  the 
smelters  or  zinc  men,’  or  do  'they  brick  them.  7  Suppose  I  should 
want  to  crush  finer  than  tailings  sent  me,  is  there  objection.? 

No  objections  to  the  smelters  as  to  fine  concentrates.  The 
works  at  Belgium  made  slight  objections  to  the  fineness  of  the 
zinc  concentrates  when  shipments  first  started,  but  have  not 
Objected  since.  Understand  these  zinc  concentrates  they  are 
getting  from  Leadville  are  crushed  under  stamps  and  run  in 
fineness  to  60  mesh  and  upwards.  Therefore  no  objections  if 
desired  to  crush  finer  than  the  tailings  sent  you.  _ 


[ENCLOSURE] 


-2- 

If  they  brick  them  would  it  be  an  advantage  to  us  in  selling  or 
widening  the  market  by  briquetting  ourselves  ourselves. 

No  advantage  in  bricking  the  zinc  concentrates  under  present 
conditions. 

Are  all  sources  of  supply  of  this  ore  at  Leadville. 

75  per  cent,  of  the  supply  of  this  ore  at  Leadville;  the 
remainder  at  Aspen,  Georgetown  and  Gilpin  County,  Colorado, 
and  large  quantities  in  Utah. 

What  is  price  of  soft  coal  at  Leadville  and  what  is  assay  of 
coal. 

The  price  of  soft  coal  at  Leadville  $3.00  to  $6.00  per  ton,  as 
to  quality.  It  would  hardly  be  advisable  to  construct  works 
at  Leadville,  owing  to  labor  and  coal  and  other  supplies  being 
so  much  higher  there  than  at  the  Valley.  Colorado  City  or 
Denver  would  be  much  more  desirable  location  for  the  mill  for 
this  reason,  and  in  addition  a  much  better  price  can  be 
obtained  for  the  lead  and  iron  from  the  smelters  in  the  Valley 
than  at  Leadville. 

If  I  can  show  in  a  small  plant  a  practical  solution  of  the 
problem,  could  capital  be  raised  in  Denver. 

Positively  yes. 

My  machinery  is  rather  too  large  for  1000  tons  daily.  The 
investment  would  not  be  increased  very  much  if  the  output  of 
the  mill  was  increased  to  2000  tons  daily. 

It  would  hardly  be  advisable  to  start  with  a  mikl  of  larger 
capacity  than  500  to  1,000  tons  per  day.  While  there  would 
always  be  an  active  demand  for  the  iron  and  lead  by  the  Colorado 
smelters  for  fluxing  their  sllicious  ores,  any  great  increase 
over  this  tonnage  would  have  a  tendency  to  reduce  the  price  of 
spelter.  Of  course,  additional  capacity  could  be  added  to 
the  mill  as  the  demands  of  the  trade  both  in  this  country  and 
Europe  require.  It  is  conclusive,  and  I  get  my  information 
from  the  zinc  ore  buyers  who  come  from  Swansea  and  Belgium, 
the  zinc  mines  of  Spain  and  England  are  fast  becoming  exhausted. 

Please  write  me  more  fully  as  to  prices.  I  want  to  get  at  the 
margin  for  working  to  see  how  much  there  is  in  it. 

The  crude  ore  sameas  sample  sefat  you  is  now  being  delivered 
on  board  cars  and  to  mills  at  Leadville  for  concentration  at 
price  of  $4.50  to  $5.00  per  ton  of  2,000  lbs.  The  regular 
tariff  rate  from  Leadville  to  Denver  or  Pueblo  is  $2.25  per 
ton,  but  a  rate  of  $1.50  per  ton  could  possibly  be  secured  from 
Leadville  to  Colorado  City. 


The  Colorado  Midland  Railway  Co.( 

Denver,  Colorado,  February  17,  1900. 


My  dear  Edison s- 

With  this  I  enclose  Wells  Fargo  &  Company’s  receipt 
for  three  sacks  of  zinc  ore  shipped  from  Leadville  on  February  14th, 
on  which  there  should  not  be  any  charges. 

This  is  said  to  be  the  poorest  ore  which  can  be  procured; 
weight  about  250  pounds,  and  the  party  procuring  same  advises  me  samples 
contain  ore  where  iron  sulphide  is  about  equal  to  zinc. 


Mr.  Thos.  A.  Edison, 


Mr.  liaison. 

Mr.  Dick  just  telephoned  out  and  said  that  a  $ood 


friend  of  hie,  on  hie  way  to  Canada,  met  a  man  by  the  name  of 
Louie  G.  Rowand  from  Newark,  who  claims  that  he  wae  once  in 
partners  with  you  or  worked'  for  you.  He  claims  to  have  a  separa¬ 
tor  for  rrold  and  all  kinds  of  minerals,  which  he  claims  work's 
about  the  same  as  yours  and  has  them  in  operation  all  over  the 
world.  He  calls  it  the  Whitheral  separator.  His  place  is  corner 
of  Clover  &  Ferguson  Street,  Newark  and  lives  in  «aef  Orange.  Mr. 

t0^0W  lf  y0u  know  anJrthln'l  about  him  so  he  can  tele¬ 
graph  to  his  friend*  /?  ,  ,  t 

.  _ . _  (J[ 


CUOAHY,  PrRsiifanr.  W.  H.  ISOM.  V,co  Preai.ta.il. 


Mr.  T.  A.  Edison, 

Orange,  N.  J. 

Dear  Sir:- 


In  accordance  with  the  request  of  Mr.  H.  E.  Dick,  I 
should  esteem  it  as  a  great  favor  if  you  would  kindly  advise  us  by 
return  mail  just  what  samples  you  desire  to  come  down  on  the  first 
boat  from  Alaskan  waters  during  the  coming  season,  and  oblige, 

Yours  truly, 

NORTH  AMERICAN  TRANSPORTATION  .&  TRADING  CO. 


(j6.  or 

,  Secretary, 

Lw  16  <Y  ir  IL  ^ 

^  «|Gr  <rJT 


| j'\.  trvw-ij. 

•*f  Y&C-k&f 

j)  . .  w-w-  I.U  c wcu^i  ib' 


A. 


■'ttCI-u 
0 


!  f-tf  o-fe' 


ajui  ^ 


9 


JstxJL  c£L*-m — 

om  L^t-^j, M-  ^  -jHr 

^ _ ,£t-Jcettt «  ©*u-*~~~//? 


~  <p~  ' 

tT  ^ 

>0^  ^  c)  — 1- 

_r  -  |(«^w.vt-rf-'-^',-'^-s' — 


Si^xc  ir  CUf- 


f  -  <^  ' 


SrCe^t' 


t/WK^' 


ft^A 


CC« - -  (po  et'll  - 

SJS-  'w~"'“<" .—  1 

Vl**  QxJLcIo-*.  'yr *-**$' ' 


—  Rotfc  *#S& 


ti 


K-*  T.  Wf- 


<4/  sO-^8  0$  d<aot 

/^f  Q'7^7^-  Q^Lt>y'  '7^?'^(  >  <^y-r<ZL  ^ _ 

<?^r7^r.  _  .  '^?^-<^<r<.<€ ^  -^c?-*-(Lf _ 

^-e/'/3^cz  ct 


ACCOUNTING  DEPARTMENT. 

The  Rookery 

Chicago,  April  26,  1900. 


Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison, 

Orange,  H.  J. 

Dear  Sir; 

On  April  9  we  mailed  you  certificates  of  stock  of  this  company  by  registered 
mail.  We  have  received  a  receipt  bearing  date  of  April  13  signed  by  yourself  per 
J.  E.  Boehme,  but  have  heard  nothing  further,  and  as  we  do  not  know  who  Mr.  3oehme  is, 
thought  best  to  call  your  attention  to  the  matter. 

Yours  truly, 

NORTH  AMERICAN  TRANSPORTATION  &  TRADING  CO. 

Vice-President. 


[ATTACHMENT] 


[ATTACHMENT] 


The  Electric  Smelting  and  Aluminum  Co. 


ALFRED  H.  COWLES.  Pr 


CHAS.  W.  CHASE,  Se 
E8,  CLEVELAND. 


w 


Edison  Magnetic  Separator/ Co . , 
$>  Thomas  A.  EdisoA, 


ARCADE, 

CLEVELAND,  O.,  yay  1st.,  J90  0. 

•Cfer#r9/ 


Menlo  Park,  New  Jersey, 


Mill  your  magnetic  separator  do  the  same  plaoa^/^k  as  thJ 
Wetherill  separator?  [/W~pT”Ld  Q^  ^rJy 

am  interested  in,  into  three  proc 


.Bie-jthat  thglr  een( 

“t  ^'A.Uvj 

products,  /the  most 
and  chaloopyritS;  the  next 
«Tmn^aEn5ti^^duc t , 


The  Wetherill  Separato: 
separate  an  ore  that  I  am 
magnetio  being  pyrrhotite  carrying  n^c 
less  magnetic  product, 

gangue,  pyrites  and  galena.  C~~~^ 

Of  course  this  is  a  question  of  separating  difforerf^^3Spl^&t',^e#~’'». 
wherein  the  magnetic  properties  are  very  small  compared  to  that  of  mag¬ 
netite. 

I  am  President  of  a  mining  company  having  an  immense  body  of  this 
ore  exposed,  and  by  first  treating  it  to  magnetic  separation  itB  pro¬ 
ducts  would  become  available  as  marketable  products  to  the  various  Kino 
and  copper  smelters. 

The  Wetherill  separator,  X  imagine,  is  oontroled  by  what  is  known 
as  the  New  Jersey  zinc  Co.  in  whioh  company  ^  ;  combined  many  of  the 
largo  zinc  plants  of  the  country.  Therefore  X  am  desirous  to  learn  as 
to  whether  or  not  we  would  be  dependent  upon  them  to  secure  a  magnetio 
separator  that  would  efficiently  do  our  work. 

Very  truly  yours. 


m, /  y&K 


-•M . 


MICHAEL  CUDAHY,  Prmitol.  W.  H.  ISOM.  Vico  Prealdnnl. 


Cudahy:  This  has  remained  unanswered  owing  to  Mr.  Cudahy's  absence 

from  the  City.  His  understanding  was  that  one  of  the  Certificates 
for  500  shares  was  to  be  turned  over  to  a  party  whom  either  you  or 
Mr.  Dick  had  made  arrangements  with,  to  take  same,  and  we  were  not 
to  know  his  name.  You  will  remember  sending  Mr.  Dick  a  dispatch 
advising  that  a  certain  party  was  ready  to  take  500  shares,  and  in 
a  conversation  with  Mr.  Dick  before  he  left,  the  writer  was  given 
to  understand  that  this  same  party  desired  an  additional  500,  or 
1000  shares  in  all. 


.dent? 


Yours  truly, 

NORTH  AMERICAN  TRANSPORTATION  &  TRADING  CO. 

Z^Z7$J* 

I ■  \ 


"W.  (X.  jj *** 

W  s^.-  \J  ■  ^  J 

3  onn>^L  U  CW~v^~~> 

t^AlUt  OL>wA  IpZA  Xfc*  ^*-^**JL^*1* 

"Vluv-.  ^pUnift^-  ^<r^' 

U^u  ^  W 

5~§-  o  o  o  (Xcaco^  «HL  CVv*+Xir-*Jl  a— ^ 

-t__W  X— I 

XxXzzrX^  irzX 

~-  fr~“>  **• . 

tvU  f,L~  ■ 


“tjb  O'*-*-  /°_,St^) 

Lv  XAXTtA.  » 

»  nr* 


!:  igz* 


^  3  <vi*«  /** 

°r^  ^ 

A-*y  -t-vv  (^h^Xr 

0-W^O t-*-**s.  <^n*J - - 


CX-t-eXv/4  6L*>1*^" 

*W- . *  «,  9 


e_j^XX_  U^va__ 


IfMM  >~-Xj 

V  llAJwZc^  J  cXu> 


v.  CirLL~-  A/^i  sif^. 

•uU  — 


‘sroao/M 


HARVEY  NELSON,  PROP. 

j  &9. 


-^Ai^,*'\\u6Vu.cw  CX.  fisC/UOA.  , 

aU*-’.  — 

OwfcU 

(X A»—  cJLsuXhS  Ck/V-  /£* 


3 


L*w^trvvkcJ{iA5Av^  .  CX^Vv*.  3  /tJ>  VirvO»J?i»2^" 
^*v-  <Vw1a«4X^*  aavA-u^-vUk^  Ct 
U.  LrtAAflls.  ,  «V  tuX»  Oa.  T>tn 
CtAA.  AAV^4v  i^rWw  A-k  V-  ClT^pl.  ^ 

"1/Cv.  5~5"^  tt\  O.CAA^u_  P-£uLX 


/&  &*-  A*J 


i*.  yirCw-c-fe/v- 


CLt/u/U--~  jZA4\  v 


JbZ/x.  guvaJ!.  -tAufriX. 

•AJAkJGI*.  OOv<Aj  (VvuUI 


HARVEY  NELSON,  P 


O^awc  /Wv^  OL-oAZvtXij  |aA^r>^k&Q 
jrOisWi.  /wiJpk,  ,<|mL/L_ 

j2^\k/v-  /t^cs^v  c/Lswx^__  •  *  (ylu/  JLaXXs aI 

XAr'-Py^'C*.  L/ajl.  c^vt«_A^w  , 

J  ,  Dt  5^) 

lu/v.  Cr£X/\_ 

Lva/o.  avriA.  L-O'Ca^aLval*  'XTiA^iAsnyt-t*. 
^\Xo-iXJL  (  Oru.  UJ)  exa^v. 

V\4^\  (JiuCyyX  /(y^Ai^y^X  i^SUA. 
/W\M&k  /1/KJVa  /{>*-  Lovk^vtL  SU- 

(Ljx\^_  /vco-CXm!*^  (  ^v-  cJt"  JUasJT  t 

/UjUL 

rC^MJw,  . 

<uha^v*aA.  yt 

/^WVIaATlA1W1_.  /{>AmiJa>l,  f—tA*- 
^Vwet/ tA/i«4A^  |q^lrtj*v<>^-*<A^ - 


jr- iaTU-v. 

/ts><p*JLk-  A>*-  C^wt^£»|  Ok^v—  /^r'LX*MTL-'_r 

^tAHTuk.  /V/vLX^. 

(va_tta^Ccfcx  JZAA^fXr^X^rt 

(Va^  ^  |xnXvv  (IjiA,  *  AArtrr^AL^iAWtxX  f 
(Tv —  C-riA^X<ve-''-  'Xa  CiXi.  frxcjjjGu, 

Ce'vta^vv-  /C*l'v»-l/i^.  0>v-t?L  /t4joc^ 

-fckv.  XkX-V'i-  >t>  c\.c/o^_ 

^*k</lk.  a_  /uvoav.  CajvXX 
4*-  Av/»jJL_  oXe»  '{jjv-  Oy^ujftvtfX. 

CjOOkA-'tG  AArW^k.  ,  Gl/vA.  QlJXa^,  (>A. 

/^aXtu-c*^'  (Km.  aa.caaaoL 

j^OV-  y^Arc-ckji^j  "t?i-CAA.  /O -c-A^tXtJiJuf 


^c^1-  (QAAAH-ALCo  CIGtA-v.  'G—k- 

Xk^-CU-|L£>vXl^  c/C_^  flstLf^L  , 


'W'i/tHi  TtGa  >k^  cjlXXoctm  vJ  ~£tvCfa  > 

/VrXiXe-k.  V  C^'We-v-  V-a/L—  f 

Cav^  tjuSX^Lcf 

^*«>aAitV4  —  3  Qg-e-ckAnJ*^  (O+iXk. 

J  i_a~  (j^XiAjL4AA-^k_ 

^W«V»AA»-CTrt>k_.  «ATi^  yl-<vX.  C^i*^ 

/iXr  '^-X  aa-caa^o^^  /G»^ 
^Axej  /lAJuX^  ('T'l/lykTlACH  ftX  BUCA__. 

JCAAxj^  g^AjtvuslaicR^  X 
"^VlAk.  ^GrLLa—  t  *~!'lA^lA«AA4At6  / 

/^A^tk  aM.. 

^VbftVkXLu  a-c^bi-u\Aj^ 


CjUk^ 


1900. 


Dear  Sir 

The  Daily  chronicle  in  its  edition  from  Janu¬ 
ary  12ih  1898  mentioned  in  combination  with  your  name 

the  discovery  of  a  new  metal  which  as  was  claimed  when 
the 

mixed  with  cast  iron  gives  the  latter  hardness  and 
strength  of  wrought  iron.  From  another  source  this 
somewhat  meager  communication  was  completed  saying  that 
the  qualities  of  the  newly  discovered  metal  were  to  be 
explained  through  the  presence  of  titanium  therein. 

Having  been  ordered  by  the  German  Navy  Department 
to  report  on  this  subject  and  the  possible  use  which  ha 
come  out  of  it  all  my  attempts  to  get  the  desired  in¬ 
formation  have  met  so  far  with  complete  failure.  So  I 
have  finally  decided  to  apply  to  your  kindness  asking 
you  if  possible  to  furnish  me  with  such  information,  as 
you  may  deem  advisable .  Assuring  you  that  any  answer 
will  be  highly  appreciated  I  remain 
Very  truly  Yours 


Captain  lieutenant  Imperial  German  Navys 
Naval  Attachi  to  the  German  Embassy. 


[ON  BACK  OF  PRECEDING  PAGE] 


Id 'Q^-La  -*  .  /  .  j 

£>  .  L,  hjJdi  h  fw  ! 

^  cffs^  %=-" 

“(U  H—-JJ 

Vw  ?-  1  | 

\»-c£i,J-  ~  fW*"  lf^  (Is^y^^XzA-  | 

■utidl—,  <-,  i“*^ 

V^~~ ■*■  “**-^7  hf”? 

(Sa;-|iwJ-^t-;^rf  | 

,  \  ^  Q-r:  .£  f-^i  j 

Cc^U  ■a**'-^  pw  ^  I 

Wv-^  UC*— ^  y  ■■  i 


. rP . _ _.. 


(3^.  ^?.  ^  J~?  cl^L 


(^PsQ-^-Ap  T7i-\  Cp^M..3J(  r 

: _  bC  £?  PcAPAiru  d^L 


Zr . 

. i/u 

. - . ^  3^ 

5,  CPTU^  . 

- . . .  0\  _ wtc, 

Ck-dA  'L/i&h  ,  £?P-\  ^ 


9^  ''flaw  hLsti/iwh 


[ON  BACK  OF  PRECEDING  PAGE] 


(3. 


u 


L  uzzr'lu.  c—  ^  f' 


~~r 


Jr  T~(<° 


4-*W  C*^ 

6M 

^C'e^S 

UJ7£^k^ - 


U.  terr^&  A^-b-t 


1900.  Mining  -  Ortiz  Mine  (D-00-14) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to 
Edison's  dry  placer  process  for  the  extraction  of  gold  ore.  Most  of  the  items  are 
letters  to  Edison  from  his  brother-in-law,  John  V.  Miller,  and  from  Cloyd  M. 
Chapman,  who  went  to  the  Ortiz  Mine  in  Dolores,  New  Mexico,  to  prospect  and 
to  supervise  the  construction  of  an  experimental  ore  processing  mill.  An 
undated  report,  probably  from  late  December,  gives  an  overview  of  activities 
at  the  Ortiz  Mine  during  1900. 

Approximately  60  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  Most  of 
the  documents  not  selected  are  ore  assay  tables,  unsolicited  inquires  regarding 
the  dry  placer  process,  or  brief  agreements  made  between  the  Galisteo  Co., 
which  constructed  the  mill,  and  the  men  hired  to  sink  mine  shafts. 


GALISTEO  COMPANY, 


DOLORES,  NEW  MEXICO, V#: 

f ^  ^  ^.^4 

^  *sfc  .i^. 

^  ^  *-**a=“  •-*  v  ZL»  ^  Z, 

if  ?n  ^s-  ^  *6  *VW  S&Z 

'Z"  ^  ^  >*.  ^ 

^  V  ^  >***-  ^  ^ 

y  ^  ^  ^  w-z 

r  &-  ^  r/L^  3a  o  :  / 


y'" 

/"“  7S&, 


-  ^r 

yr  - —  V^2T 

2T  ^  ^  ^  y 


GALISTEO  COMPANY. 


I  &<J*>  s'**  'tcS 

/a^<»^=  tt^S-^T  %la>*-£-i*~  **c~~  — 


Dolores',  N .  £,  Moh.  20,  1900. 


Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison, 

Orange,  II.  J. 

Do  ar  Mr  .  E  di  soii  , 

Upon  our  arrival  here  on  Feb.  9th.  we  found 
things  very  different  from  what  we  had  expectod.  Sot  only 
was  the  building  not  under  way  but  the  grading  for  it  was 
far  from  finished.  The  lumber  Jhag  only  partly  been  delivered 
on  account  of  a  fire  at  the  saw-mill.  The.  carpenters  were 
here ■ and  were  framing  the  timbers  as  they  arrived 

Mr..  Burn  had  first  selected  and  cleared  a  site  on 
a  fairly  level  spot  on  the  summit  of  the  mesa  where  very  lit¬ 
tle  grading  would  have  been  necessary,  but, after  a  reconsid¬ 
eration,  changed  the  location  to  one  less  exposed  to  the  wind 
more  convenient  to  the  proposed  shafts  and  offering  excellent 
dumping  facilities.  It  is  at  the  head  of  a  deer,  arroyo  near 
the  head  of  the  mesa  and  extends  into  the  bank  {gravel  and 
bed  rock(  some  forty  feet.  The  accompanying  blue  print  shows 
this  quite  plainly. 

The  condition  of  the  site  was  so  unsuitable  for  the 
erection  of  the  plant  on  account  of  its  small  size  and  unev- 
ennessthat  we  found  it  necessary  to  do  a  considerable  blast¬ 
ing  in  the  bled  rook.  This  occupied  some  ten  days.  The  site  in 
its  present  [state  we  consider  quite  satisfactory. 


/ 


Dpon  the  arrival  of  the  sills  and  floor-beams  the  e- 
reotion  of  the  building  was  at  once  begun  Feb.  26th.  and  has  pro¬ 
gressed  rapidly  and  satisfactorily  as  the  accompanying  prints 
taken  weekly  will  show.  We  expect  the  building  .to  be  entirely 
finished  by  the  end  of  the  month. 

Machinery . 

.Our  oar  from  Orange  arrived  on  Feb.  J2th.  in  very  good 
condition.  One  pulley  only  was  broken  and  that  in  hauling  .from 
Cemllos  to  Colores.  This  has  already  been  replaced  from  Al¬ 
buquerque.  The  boiler  and  engine  were  here  and  in  good  condi¬ 
tion  upon  our  arrival  and  the  engine  was  yesterday  placed  up¬ 
on  its  foundation  in  the  building.  The  generator  arrived  all 
right  and  will  bo  in  place  as  soon  as  the  engine  room  is  ready. 

As  soon  as  possible  after  our  arrival  we  sent  out  for 
bids  on  well  seasoned  lumber  for  our  interior  work.  Owing  to  the 
great  demand  for  lumber  no  dealers  nearer  here  than  Denver  keep 
a  stock  long  enough  to  allow  it  to  become  well  seasoned.  They 
could  furnish  us  only  green,  freshly  sawed  lumber.  After  con¬ 
siderable  correspondence  and  calling  personnally  unon  the  deal¬ 
ers  in  Albuquerque,  Santa  Fe,  Las  Vegas,  and  finally  Denver 
we  obtained  satisfactory  stock,  partly  from  Denver  and  partly 
from  Santa  Fe .  The  cost  was  about  $17.60  at  the. yards.  The  ship¬ 
ment  from  Santa  Fe  has  arrived  and  that  from  Denver  is  on  the 
way  and  due . 

As  soon  as  Smith,  our  carpenter  from  Orange.,  can  be 
spired  from  working  on  the  building  he  will  at  once  begin  on 


interior  apparatus,  which  will  be  this  week. 


The  screens  are  being  nut  on  -the  frames  and  will  be  ready 
in  ample 'time. 

e  found  here  a  rotary  roastor  or  dryer  which  we  are  getting  • 
repaired  and  into  shape  for  drying  .our  gravel.  We  believe.it  will 
do  the  work  very  well.  — * 

Mr.. Burn  had  a  very  convenient  assay  office  built  and 
ready  for  us  on  our  arrival  aiid.it  is  now  fitted  up  with  scales 
etc;  ready  for  use. 

Miscellaneous .... 

Mr.  Burn  has  sunk  two  rows  of  shaft*  across  the  head 
of  the .mesa  near  the  mill  site  about  one-hundreh  feet  apart. 

As  soon  as  we  are  in  working  ordor  complete  data  concerning  .these 
and  all  shafts  will  be  forwarded  to  you.  We  would  like  little . 
more . detailed  instructions  concerning  the  number  of  shafts,  their 
distribution,  and  the  area  of  mesa  to  be  covered. 

Water  is  very  scarce  except  during  the  rainy  season, 
of  July  and  August.  The  only  stream  within  fifteen  or  twenty 
miles  that  has  water  the  year  around  is  the  Galisteo  River  but 
even  it  at  this  time  of  the  year  disappears  entirely  in  the  sand 
in. places.  It  is  some  six  miles  from  the  head  of  the  mesa  anH 
about  a  thousand  feet  below. 

There  is  a  good  spring  here  in  Dolores  which  will  fur¬ 
nish  us  with  water  for  the  experimental  plant. 

We : have  a  site  selected  for  a  weir  in  the  Galisteo  Riv¬ 
er  at  a  dyke  so  that  we  believe  we  can  obtain  correct  measure¬ 
ment  of  all  the  water  as  here  doubtless  all  the  water  comes. to 
the .surface . 

We  are  very  much  pleased  with  the  accomodations  pre¬ 
pared  for  us  by  Mr.  Burn  and  think  you  did  not  overdraw  the  de- 


lightful  climate  of  this  section.  But  the 
you  lead  us  to  expect  are  scarcer  than  th 
poorer  quality. 


Very 


ipectf  ul^ 


charming  senoritas 
e  water  and  of  far 


6,(M.  — 


Mr.  Thonias  A.  Edison, 

Orange,  N.  J. 


Dolores,  N .  M.  Apr.  IS, 


Dear  Mr.  Edison :- 

Continuing  our  report  of  March  20th:- 
The  building  was  completed  on  Monday, ‘Apr .  9th.  and  we  at 
once  took  all  the  carpenters,  including  the  contractor,  making  nine 
in  all,  upon  the  interior  work. 

The  storage  bins  are  practically  completed,  also  the  frame¬ 
work  of  the  belt  conveyor,  and  the  two  large  thirty  ton  bins  are 
entirely  finished.  The  framework  of  the  screening  apparatus  is  up 
and  that  for  the  elevators  is  being  -raised  today.  The  separator  we 
do  not  propose  to  open  up  or  erect  until  the  carpenter  work  is.  com¬ 
pleted  in  orfler  to  keep  it  as  secret  as  possible.  The  line  shafting  is 
is  being  strung  and  the  engine,  boiler  and  generator  are  in  position 


and  in  working  order  and  furnishing  light  for  the  carpenters  to  work 
evenings,  6:20  to  9:20.  The  screens  are  about  completed  and  the 
buckets  are  all  on  the  elevator  belts. 

fe  exnect  all  the  construction  work  to  be  completed  in  three 
weefs  when  we  shall  be  read}'  to  make  preliminary  runs. 

A  question  has  arisen  between  Mr.  Furn  and  ourselves  re¬ 
garding  -the  employment,  management  and  pay  of  the  men  at  work  for  us  : 
in  the  mill.  He  thinks  it  his  duty  to  attend  to  these  matters  him¬ 
self  and  this  would  be  sitisfactory  to  us  if  it  were  not  for  the 
fact  that  we  have  lost  one  man  and  would  have  lost  four  more  that 


would  have  been  hard  to  replace,  if  we  had  not  taken  the  matter  into 
our  own  hands'.  Three  carpenters  would  have  quit  this  morning  and  car- 
are  very  hard  to  get  as  there  is  a  great  demand  for  then.  Our  machine'** 
also  quit  work  but  we  induced  him  to  go.  to  work  again. 

We  would  very  much  like  to  have  our  position  defined  as  Mr. 

Hoyt  expects  to  be  here  this  month  and  Mr.  Burn  will  probably  bring  • 
the  matter  up  while  he  is  here.  We  would  suggest  that  you  write  out 
a  statement  giving  us  complete  authority  in  reference  to  all  mat¬ 
ters  pertaining  to  the  engineering  part  of  the  opperations  here 
subject  to  you  and  to  the  approval  only  of  Mr.  Burn 'as  agent  of 
the  Company. 

Hoping  that  the  work  here  is  progressing  to  your  satisfac¬ 
tion  and  that  we  shall  soon  hear  frqm  you,  we  remain, 


Yours  truly, 


6  ,M,  -  Pru  /•%. 


Thomas  A.Edison,Esq. 

New  York,K.Y. 


Denver, Colo  .Kay  2,1900. 


I  understand  you  have  a  plant  in  New  Mexico, on  the  Ortiz 


grapt,to  work  dry  placers.  Would  you  please  inf on 


i  if  it  is  a  success  and 


if.  so  on  what  terms  it  could  he  secured  to  work  such  placers  in  old  Mexico, 
and  what  a  plant  of  10,000  cubic  yafids  daily  capacity  would  cost  f/o/b/at 
factory, and  also  what  you  consider  the  average  cost  ofrworking  the  gravel 
per  cubic  yard  to  be. 

Yours  very  respectfully, 


^  yoUrt'-*.'  '*>  'ft  1 

oo*>  dfri" 


<g-.Ce.  1 


o- 


June  27,  1900 


GALISTPO  COMPANY, 


0fie.  — 

OrzTlz-  M/M£L 


wMajr—5, . 19.0.0 . 

Edison  Laboratory, 

0range,N.J. 

Dear  Sirs:-  Will  you  please Jkave  Mr.  Rogers  punch  for  us  fifty 

more  of  the  seven  thousandths  screens  of  two  thousandths  brass  and  also 
fifty  of  the  nine  thousandths  screens  of  three  thousandths  brass  and 
ship  them  as  soon  as  finished  by  express  to  Salisteo  Go.  Cerrillos,  N  .1,1. 
We  hope'  that  these  can  be  made  at  once  and  forwarded.  . 

best  to  everybody  at  the  Lab 
?s  very  truly, 

GALISTEO  CO. 


Mr.  Burn, Mr.  Miller  and  myself  send  < 


Since  our  Iasi  report  of  April  16th  the  construc¬ 
tion  wort  in  the  mill  has  been  entirely  completed  and  on  the  7th  inst. 
a  short  preliminary  test  of  the  screens  and  separator  was  made. 

Mr.  Hoyt  was  present  at  the  tests  and  seemed  much  pleased  with  the 
results . 

tfe  are  now  building  the  dryer  house  for  the  rotary  dryer  which  we 
found  on  the  grant  and  which  we  have  tested  and  think  will  meet  the 
requirements  of  the  plant.  The  finishing  -touches  are  also 

being  .put  on  the  entire,  plant--  covering  the  bearings,  with  canvas  - 
putting  in  shelving  &a  -  and  by  the  first  of  next  week  wc  expect  to 
begin  regular  running.. 

Our  first  run  was  very  pleasing  to  us.  The  belt  conveyor  worked 
as  well  as  one  could  ■wish.  The  elevators  delivered  clean  and  without 
loss.  The  screening  was  almost  perfect,  r.o  leakage,  or  clogging  of  the 
screens  or  chutes.  The  dust  was  very  much  less  than  was  expected.  .. 

Ac  soon  as  Regular  running  -begins  we  will  make  preliminary  trials 
with  material  taken  from  the  excavation  for  the  mill  to  ascertain  the 
proper  adjustments  as  to  rates  of  feed  and  proportions  of  coarse  and  fin®, 
for  the  different  sizes  of  screens. 

On  account  of  the  continual  breakin^up  of  the  gravel  and  the.  produc¬ 
tion  of  fines  and  dust  during  screening  .and  to  save  wear  on  the  thin 
brass  screens  we  have. decided  to  try  to  change,  the  order  of  screening  . 
and  uake  the  large. . sizes  out  first. 

The  cone  friction  pulleys  for  the  regulation  of  the  speed  of  the 
separator  fan  work  very  satisfactorily.  ■ 

“In  spite  of  all  the  precautions  taken  we  can  not  prevent  the  work- 


Dolores,  N .  M.  June:6,  1900 


Mr.  T.  A.  Kdioon ,  . 

Orange.,  H.J. 

Dear  Mr.  Edison  ;- 

iiince  our  last  report  of  May  9th.  vie  •  have  been  carry¬ 
ing  on  experiments  relative  to  rates  of  feed  and  clogging  of  screens. 
i±a  the  coarse  material  available  here  is  much  larger  than  that  we  had 
in  Orange.  v,e  .  immediately  found  it  possible  to  increase,  the  rate  of  fee- 
over  the  screens  and  still  beep  them  clean.  Accordingly  we  have  carrie 
on  quite  extensive  experiments  in  this  line  occupying  the  first  two 
weeks  since  our  last  report  anD  feel  quite  certain  that  it  will  be 
practical  to  at  least  double  the  Maximum  rate  we  had  at  the. Lab.  name¬ 
ly,  one  ten,  half  coarse  and  half  fine,  per  Screen  per  hour. 

The  results  of  these  experimentsjalthough  showing  great  improve¬ 
ment,  were  not  satisfactory  owing  .to  the  uneven  distribution  of  coarse 
and  fine  over  the  roller  feed  due  to  the  conning  of  the  material  in 
the  hopper.  Vie  must  confess  tint  for  some  .  unknown  reason  vie  neglected 
to  make  any  provision  to.  prevent  this.  Ve  immediately  set  t^v.-cr!.  on 
the  problem  undjfound  it  very  hard  to  solve.  Our  roller;.. feed  extends 
over  four  banks  of  screens  so  that  the  outer  banks  received  west,  of 
the  coarse  while  the  inner  ones  received  the  fines.  After  about  two 
weeks  of  experimenting  wo  have  finally  obtained  an  arrangement  which 
is  fairly  satisfactory  but  which  vie  hone  to  improve  whenever  we  have 
the  opportunity  during  regular  running..  We  are  at  present  putting  .in 
this  distributing  apparatus  or  arrangement  throughout  the  screening  : 
apparatus  andvdll  start  again  this  afternoon  on  experiments,. 


Just  when  the  bo  experiments  wi  1  he  finished  v.o  are  unable  to  stats 
definitely  but  tie  we  have  had  the  experience  .  of  the  other  tests  v.o  thin], 
that  it  wi.l  only  occupy  u  few  days. 

Wo  v.eie  intending  to  welt  until  these  experiments  were  completed  be¬ 
fore  sen  ding  another  report  but  as  they  arc  .occupying  «o  much  time  v.o 
send  this  today. 

All  these  experiments  have  been  carried  on  with  material  from  the/fcx- 
cavation  for  •a  ho  mill  and  v.o  intend  us  in  g  this  material  throughout  all 
the  preliminary  runs  and  tests  a:  there,  is  a  largo,  amount  of  it  •which 
must  be  removed  from  its  present  position.  I'c  do  not  intend  using  any 
material  from  the  shafts  until  every  thing  is  in  perfect  order  so  tins 
•chert  will  be  no  loss  of  material  or  wor!.  when  the  actual  tests  begin. 

In  regard  to  construction  wor!-.  we  have  lately  completed  tie  dryer- 
house-  tuida  roofing  over  the  runway  which  wo  find  necessary  owing  to 
the  frequent  rains,  The  runway,  you  know,  is  used  for  the  carting  .of 
uhs  fines  pc.  'chc  e mge age.  bins  and  vs  lit  sized  material  to  the  separator 
apparatus. 

In  regard  to  the  .  screening  of  the-  gpavel  at  the  .  shafts  before-  it  is 
carted  to  the  mill  v.o  have  decided  to  hand  pic!:  all  coarse  material 
down  to  three  inch,  tlnu  pass  remainder  over  1"  screen,  the  screenin'^, 
of  this  cjor  1  /8th •  screen  for  material  to  be  taken  to  the  mill,  the 
tailings  over  a  two  inch  screen,  which  will  give  us  four  sizes-  3"  to  Z" 
2"  to  1",  1"  to  1/3",  and  mill  size.  The  material  between  1"  and  1/8" 
we  shall  pass  over  3/15"  and  3/8"  screens  to  obtain  coarse .material 
for  use  with  the  fines  in  the  screening  apparatus  whenever  necessary. 

The  two  large  screens  are  now  being  .cut  out  of  ;'/18  sheet  iron  the  other 
screens  wo  have  obtained  from  Frazei  and  Chalmers. 

Mr.3um  has  been  working  on  the  map  for  two  wo^.’.s  past.  He  has  laid 
it  out  in  500ft.  squares,  located  the  mill,  the  new  shafts  and  a  part 


. Bplores,  N  .  M'.;  June  19,  1900 

Mr.  T.  A.  Edison, 

Qrange.,  N. 

Bear  Mr'.  Edisorij- 

We  have  completed  the  experiments  relative 
to  rates  of  feed  and  proportion  of. coarse  and  fine  and  have  detef.* 
mined  on  50  to  60.  per-cent  of  coarse,  running  at  the  rate  of  two  tons 
per  screen  per  hour,  which  is  double,  the  rate  we  had  at  the  labora-i 
tory.  We  are  at  present  making  .two  series  of  runs-  passing  .the  mat¬ 
erial  over  the  fine  screens  first,  .00?  and  up,  and  over  the  large., 
screens  first,  .119  and  down.  We  shall  take. four  sizes  from  each 
run  and  pass  through  the  separator  and  make  an  accurate  determination 
of  the  efficiency  of  both  methods,  from'  present  indications  the  method 
of  using  the  o  oarse  screens  first  seems  to  be  the  better  because  all 
material  breaking  up  in  the  screening  .remains  and  comes  out  with  its 
proper  size-  and  thus  we  prevent  the  accumulations  of  fines  in  the 
larger  sizes. 

We  have  been  using  a  quarter  in4h*for  getting  out  mill  size..  The 
material  between  this  and  our  largest  screen  in  the  mill,.. 119,  a~ 
mounting  to  about  5001bs.  we.  have  panned  but  found  no  pieces  of  gold 
of  that  size,  which  leads  us  to  think  that,  perhaps  there  will  be  no 
need  of  such  coar"3e  screens'  and  that  the  gold  is  all  under  thi3  3ize . 

We  held  back  the  map  of  the  mesa  in  orderto  make  ^ome  additions, 
as  the.. extention  of  the  arroyos  and  the  location  of  some  of  the  old 
shafts.  This  work  has  been  completed  and  as  soon'  as  Mr.  Burn  makes 
a  tracing  and  blue  print  we 


shall 


id  it 


K$aftJe»i/,  .yl'rtffl/ol/?:’ 


(Q<r/MOW'. 


PHONOGRAPH  DICTATION. 

Messrs.  Miller  &  Chapman, 
Dolores,  Hew  Mexico. 
Dear  Sirs: 


2»  190 °.-y/ 


ITever  mind  the  Weir  at  Galisteo  River  hut  make  approximate 
measurements  this  Summer.  How  about  the  other  little  streams 
around  the  vicinity  of  Mesa. 


S'"  Lsq v 


jfv 

Edison, 2sq.. ,  I  %  Dolore  - ,  H .  M .  Aug .  1 ,  1900  .... 

te,  i! .  J.  r^jUL  WtX  "&  ^ 


rf'A-vv 


fufsiux ly  >.-01  a  .  iwii  4.  cu..4.;.i. ,  ..bl-j;  luWi  ©fUfcfS  vi  ... . .  This  reduction 


ox  speed  ox  the  fan  necessitated  getting  a  smaller,  pulley,  which  has 
delayed  the  running  of  the  smaller  sizes  of  gravel.  This  pulley 
arrived  today  and  a  run  was  made  on  the  "under  .007”  gravel,  the  results 
of  which  have .not  yet  been  assayed. 

Upon  making  the  .runs  with  the  separator  mentioned  in  our  report  of 
July  10th  to  determine  hue  more  .efficient  methodjof  screening  .it  became 
evident  by  the  high,  percentage,  of  gold  saved — over  99%-  and  the  low  per¬ 


centage.  of  concentrate  -  about  3/4%  -  that  we  could  increase  the 
between  the  different  sizes.  Vfe  screened  out  3ome  gravel  doub! 

the  range  ox  sizes  by  omitting  alternate  screens  and  have  made  a  i 
of  runs  with  the  separator  of  the  larger  sizes  of  gravel.  The 
sizes  have  not  been,  put  through  the  separator  because  we  could  no 
slow  enough  speed  of  fan  as  -«e  explained  above.  The. results  of  t 
runs  are  quite  encouraging  but  wc  believe.it  is  still  possible-  to 


prove  them. 


.he 

following  are  ■ 

the  results  of  all  the  runs  made 

•with  the  greater 

range 

of 

size 

,  using  gravel  taken  fro.i 

1  the  mill  excavation. 

Size 

of. 

>  of  gold  ! 

Concentrate  | 

V  alue  of  Con .  \ 

%  of  iron  | 

in  Con  . 

mate  i 

■xal 

V 

;avea 

gravel  run 

\ 

thro'  sep. 

;oi2 

to 

•  0  18\ 

£8.3 

4.74 

$5.94 

62.7 

.018 

to 

.029 

81.7 

2.33 

1  12-18 

40. 

.018 

to 

.029 

99 .1  1 

|  2.26 

194-80 

43.7 

.029 

to 

.047 

197.15 

1.975 

21 . 50 

1  12.3 

.029 

to 

.  0  47 

186  .68 

3.1 

8.60  ! 

j  8.2 

.029 

.047 

to 

to 

.047 

.0741 

96.5 
|98 . 4 

0.75 

1.745 

.  8:3! 

f:!! 

.074 

to 

.119 

93.75 

1.52 

1  4.27 

1  1.19 

^famc?/)  <J$.  tiSt/edevi?, 


Oi  to  t  — 
0>*~h-iL.  Mi*,? 


phonograph  dictation.  ^^.^1^.-16,4-000...  SS 

Messrs.  Miller  &  Chapman, 

Dolores,  Mew  Mexico. 

Dear  Sirs: 

Your  favor  of  the  1st  inst.  came  duly  to  hand,  and  in 
reply  X  heg  to  state  that  I  would  like  very  much  to  have  you  send  ' 
me  ten  or  fifteen  pounds  of  experimental  concentrates  from  mill 
site  to  try  on  separator. 


Dear  Mi'.  Edison 

Your  letter  of  Aug.  10th.  requesting  a  sample  of 
concentrate  was  received  yesterday  and  today  we  ship  you  by  express 
about  181bs.  of  the  same,  the  data  for  which  i3  as  follows:- 
Material  from  mill  excavation 
Size  of  material .  .015  to  .029 


Amount  of  material  separated .  20001bs. 

Weight  of  concentrate . . . .  17.81bs. 

Cone,  in  ^material  separated . 91fc 


Rate  ox  material  through  separator  3700lbs. 

We  made  a  run  immediately  after  the  run,  the  concentrate  of  which 
vis  send  you,  under  the  same  conditions  the  results  of  which  we  shall 
send  you  as  soon  as  we  work  them  up. 

Since  our  last  report  of  A.ug..  1st.  we  have  still  further  increased 
the  range,  of  the  sizes  of  screening,,  dividing  the  gravel  into  five 


Under  .007,'  .007  to  .015,  .015  to  .029,  .029  to  .059,  .059  to  .119 
The  results  of  this  system  of  sizing  are  fairly  satisfactory  but  the 
value  of  the  concentrate,  per  ton,  we  think,  can  be  increasedby  lower¬ 
ing  the  percent  of  the  concentrate  and  still  have  a  high  percentage, 
of  saving..  On  another  sheet  we  have  tabulated  the  results  of  runs 
made  since  our  last  reportand  upon  material  screened  according  to 


last 


above  method,  'as  you  will  see  by  referring,  .to  the  column  Size  .  of  Mat¬ 
erial.  In  our  last  report  a  mistake  was  made  in.  giving  .the  value  of 
concentrate,  per  ton  for  .018  to  .029  material  which  should  be  $19.48 
instead  of  $194.80.  j  V 

We  are' uncertain  as  to  how  far  wo  should  carry  these  experiments 
or  rather  how  far  it  is  best  to  do  so,  in  regard  to  increasing  range, 
of  size^-  percent  of  saving  of  gold,, and  percent  of  and  value  of  con¬ 
centrate.  We  should  like  very  much  to"  have  your  opinion  and  soma  in¬ 
structions  in  the  matter. 

Yesterday  we  started  work  on  one  of  the  shafts  Mr.  Burn  sank  be¬ 
fore  we  arrived  and  which  is  near:.the  mill.  As  the  material  from  this 
was  dumped  on  the  ground  an.d  more  or  less  mixed  with  surface  material 
and  dumps  of  old  workings,  the  data  for  the  same  will  not  be  very  ac¬ 
curate.  Mr.  Burn  sank  two  rows  of  shafts  in  this  locality  quite  close 
together  and  accordingly  we  thought  it  best  to  start  with  one  of  those 
making  a. complete  run,  somewhat  preliminary,  the  data  for  which  might 
be  chocked  by  that  of  another  shaft  close  by,  if  the  run  should  be 
unsatisfactory  or  incomplete  for  any  reason. 

Yours  truly, 


^  A. . 


[ENCLOSURE] 


c£ 

iMl  ax 

tt^cjyju 

L  to 

SI* 

/?oo. 

* 

in 

t4 

& 

■ji 

.fi. 

.ca« 

ill 

M 

*  :s>$-3 

M 

4/ 

0  7c,  007 

'  /.ft 

Hz 

^7.46 

®/,93 

OJ/Mjtb 

6.4, 

r  3,94 

44.* 

to 

» 

/.Of 

sox 

3,so 

87  37 

4.3 

,8ft 

ft. 

to 

" 

6.oq 

fit*- 

.si 

u-f 

8,64 

7,89 

743 

"  ' 

H.i 

— 

.?0 

— 

827 

/./» 

79,6 

H 

fOlteM 

1.19, 

ru 

76.20 

88-.  3o 

20.1 

.93 

9*4 

to 

i 

/.HI 

78,7 

7443 

8f.3o 

20. ?8 

,81 

??,8 

to 

4$ 

on"  % . 

1,63 

728 

/ 2,3 8 

44.?0 

/*,  98 

7,37 

fW 

.on 

0,69 

87, 

4?J0 

30$, 40 

4108 

8,27 

6*8 

44 

US 

9817 

27,4# 

/9f,80 

97.98 

,49 

998 

48 

.0/9  6 

7.44 

m 

$*>?0 

Mae 

37.28 

,88 

?*# 

47 

.W 

A  43 

49.2 

9$M 

trsc 

47.  ft 

.98 

99.9 

4* 

.aoY'ti 

,0/s 

'mm 

6U6 

84  Jo 

749.00 

8*838 

Af 

97.9 

to 

1,13 

79,2 

/8, 77 

ft.  20 

Mi 

7*47 

ft.  4 

€? 

?J4 

So.y 

2,63 

3.7? 

\23,6Z 

.44 

ft,  7 

to 

* 

4#&f 

hi.  7 

4.34 

8.29 

28.9 

.62 

477 

to 

i'M’ 

73.7 

7  6.86 

63.00 

26.8 

,96 

99*6 

So 

.aurkt 

1.9 

68. 

9.8-0 

27,03 

77,32 

7.73 

94/Sf 

67 

.Olf 

7 ,76 

32  J 

24. /Z 

38.84 

48.8 

3.36 

94*1 

u 

7  38 

3*7 

/8.  S8 

26.60 

30.73 

82 

m* 

S3  ‘ 

.,0X1’ 

2,38 

4,67 

S>  40" 

6.76 

/6.6 

7*309 

94.4 

_S4 

♦ 

1.19 

7.9  , 

24.92 

27.08 

33.8 

7.ZZ 

*9* 

68 

Off'** 

7* 66 

— 

2Z.28 

—  . 

38.84 

7.4f  : 

944* 

67  ^ 

Jtf 

/  9/ 

9uz , 

>8-.  06 

76. 64 

— 

S3' 

0,9 

9,9 

83/8 

83.94* 

48,18 

a?  • 

999 

.  . 

Messrs.  Miller  &  Chapman, 

Dolores,  New  Mexico. 

Dear  Sirs: 

Report  of  August  16th  received. 

1st.  If  we  get  90^  saving  of  original  gravel,  it  will  answer, 
providing-^we  simplify'  and  cheapen  the  milling  process. 

2nd.  Mr.  Hoyt  has  written  me  that  the  annual  meeting  of  the» 
Company  will  soon  take  place,  and  that  he  wants  me  to  make  a  report 
to  submit  to  the  stockholders. 

3rd.  I  think  you  should  now  go  ahead  with  the  best  arrangement 
you  have,  and  run  the  gravel  from  the  pits  through  as  first 
comtemplated.  Any  further  experiments  necessary  can  be  made  after 
you  are  through  with  all  the  test  pits. 

4th.  I  do  not  find  in  your  table  of  results,  the  column  showing 
the  weight  of  the  original  material  from  the  mine  from  which  you 
screened  the  stuff  passing  through  the  mill. 

5th.  You  have  one  column  marked,  "Value  of  this  size  gravel  per 
ton"  as  this  dont  average  over  30  cents  per  ton,  and  is  only  the 
finer  part  taken  from  a  large  quantity,  the  original  gravel  must 
have  been  very  poor  stuff;  or  do  you  mean  by  this  column  that  its 
the  original  gravel  boulders  and  all. 


#2  M  &  C  . 

6th.  In  none  of  your  reports  have  I  been  able  to  even  guess  at 
the  value  per  ton  of  the  gravel  as  a  whole. 

7th.  Please  send  results  of  each  hole  as  you  finish  it;  and  arrange 
your  colums  not  in  percentages,  hut  in  pounds;  for  instance 
Weight  of  whole  of  material  of  pit. 

Weight  of  material  screened  out  going  to  mill. 

Weight  of  each  size. 

Weight  of  Concentrate  each  size. 

Weight  of  Concentrate  after  iron  removed. 

Value  p'fer  ton  of  final  Concentrate. 

O* 

■  Value  of  the  Original  material  of  the  hole  in  ton  at  Cubic  Yard. 


Yours-,-. 


Dolores, If  .M. Sept.  15,1900. 


Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison, 

.  Orange  ,'N  .  J. 

Dear  Mr  Edison  Our  work  on  the  shafts  since  our  last  renort 

of  Aug.  16th  has  been  considerably  delayed  on  account  ofraius.  This 
seems  to  have  been  the  rainy  season,  about  the  first  of  September,  tho ' 
the  general  opinion . is  that  it  came  somewhat  late  this  year.  It  rained 
so  frequently  for  a  week  or  ten  days  that  screening  of  the  gravel. .'at  the 
shafts  was  impossible. 

We  inclose  a  report  on  Shaft  No.  3,  the  first  one  that  we  worked, 
and  would  like  to  know  whether.it  in  in  a  satisfactory  form  and  if  you 
wish  any  additional  data  or  any  changes  made.  Unless  we  hear  from  yiou 
soon  we  will  conclude  that  it  is  satisfactory  and  have  some  blanks 
printed.  We  would  also  like  to  know  whether  you  have  any  objection 
to  our  using  the  Metric  System  in  giving  the  weights  in  our  reports-. 

We  use  it  in  our  work  here  entirely  and  it  would  be  very  convenient  to 


e  shafts  are  sunk  to  bed  rook  4  1/g  x  6  ft.  in  size.  This  gives 
e  cubic  yard  of  gravel  per  foot  of  depth.  The  gravel  is  raised 
umped  on  a  platform  where  the  stones  over  4"  are  hand  picker  out. 
einainder  is  then  passed  over  a  2"  ,  1"  ,  1/2"  square  wire  screen 
1/8"  slot  screen  successively.  We  use  this  order  of  screening;  . 


and  dumped  c 
The  remainde 


and  a  1/8"  slot  screen  successively.  We  use  this  order  of  screenin 
so  that  the  gravel  will  go  over  as  many  screens  as  possible  to  clean 
the  atones  and  break  up  the  lumps.  These  screens  are  so  arranged 

on  platforms  as  to  reduce  the  loss  and  mixing  with  surface  material  t> 
minimum.  The  different  sizes  thus  obtained,  namely,  over  1 

12"  to  4",  4"to  2",  2"to  1",  l"to  1/2",  l/2»to  1/8",  and  under  1/8", 
weighed  in  loads  of  uniform  weight,  with  the  exception  of  the  last  si: 
or  mill  size  which  is  measured  in  boxes  of  known  capacity.  All  size: 
aTjove  1/2"  are  thrown  aside  after  being  -weighed.  The  size  between 


-2- 

1/2"  and  1/6"  we  find  contains  a  large  quantity  of  lumps  which  .era try  a 
considerable  gold.  Uu  this  account  we  save  this  size  and.  treat  it  as 

explained  below.  The  mill  size  after  being  measured  is  hauled  to  the 

dry  house  in  a  specially  made  wagon  box  which  is'  perfectly  tight. 

After  the  shaft  is  finished  we  take  its  dimensions  every  three  feet  from 
surface  to  bed  rock  and  its  average  depth.  From  this  data  its  cubic 
contents  is  calculated.  {f. 

.(In  working  Shaft  No.S  instead  of  weighing  the  sizes  larger  than 
mill  size  we  attempted  to  measure  them  by  volume.  This  v,e  found  to  be 
very  inaccurate  as  it  gave  us  a  volume  of  material  excavated  a  consider¬ 
able  in  excess  of  the  actual  volume  of  the  shaft ,  as  you  will  see  in  the 
report.) 

The  mill  size  on  reaching  the  dry  house  is  stored  in  a  bin  until 

there  is  a  sufficient  quantity  to  run  the  rotary  dryer.  After  going 

through  the  dryer  it  is  weighed  ana  spread  on  the  floor  of  the  dry  house 
until  the  entire  mill  size  of  the  shaft  being  worked  is  in  the  dry  house 
and  ready  for  sizing. 

The  dry  house  is  situated  far  enough  above  and  back  of  the  mill  to 
permit  of  the  gravel  being  run  by  gravity  down  to  the  belt  conveyor 
which  delivers  it  into  the  hopper  feeding  the  screening  apparatus  ,  or 
as  we  call  them  "sizers". 

The  gravel  between  1/2"  and  1/8"  which  contains  quite  a  propor¬ 
tion  of  lumps  as  mentioned  above  is  run  over  .119"  screens  until  these  j 

lumps  are  broken  up  and  the  pebbles  cleaned  of  adhering  particles, 
the  screenings  of  this  are  added  to  the  mill  size.  The  portion  that 

does  not  break  up  comprises  the  1/2"  to  1/8"  size. 

The  sizes  of  material  are  then  screened  out  in  the  following  order1 
.119  to  1/8",  .094  to  .119,  .074  to  .094,  .059  to  .074,  .029  to  .059, 
under  .007,  .007  to  1015,  .015  to  .029. 

The  rate  of  feeding  the  sizers  is  at  present  about  one  ton  of  the  mill 
size  per  hour  per  screen,  with  which  is  run  about  an  equal  amount  of 
coarse  gravel.  We  use  two  sizes  of  coarse  gravel,  the  larger, 


sizing  the  gravel  above 
1/4"  slot  screen,  in 


-2- 

between  a  1/4"  slot  and  2/8"  square  screen  : 

.029  and  a  smaller,  between  a  1/4"  square  ar 
sizing  the  remainder. 

The  sized  gravel  is  weighed  and  the  weight  per  cubic  foot  is  deter¬ 
mined  by  measuring  and  weighing  six  cubic  feet  of  each  size.  It  is 
then  scored  in  numbered  and  labeled  bins  ready  for  separation. 

As  the  sized  gravel  is  run  through  the  separator  a  sample  of  the 
tailings. (about  4K  >  is  taken  by  means  of  a  2"  belt  conveyor  running 
through  the  center  of  the  machine.  The  total  concentrate  is  saved 
and  the  magnetite  removed  by  means  of  a  hand  magnet. 

,  *n  your  original  instructions,  items  29  to  42  inclusive,  you 

suggest  triplicate  assays  by  fire  of.  nortions  of  the  concentrate  and 
tailings  sample.  This  we  find  to  be  impractical  for  the  following  . 

reasons.  The  tailings  contain  so  little  gold  that  we  could  not 

assay  enough  to  get  a  button  that  could' be  seen  and  handled.  There  are' 
so  few  colors  of  gold  in  the  entire  sample  of  the  tailings  that  a  sample 
could  not  be  taken  that  might  be  depended  upon  .for  fairness,  it  might 
contain  one  of  the  colors  and  it  might  not.  The  concentrate  contains 

so  few  particles  of  gold  in  comparison  with  the  total  that  accurate 
samples  can  not  be  taken.  We  have  tried  dividing  the  concentrate 
into  two.  parts  but  even  these  varied  a  considerably  in  the  amount  of 
gold  contained.  For  these  reasons  we  are  having  panned  the  entire 


concentrate  and  the  entire  tailings  sample  by  Mr.  Burn  and  a- Mexican 
expert.  This  panning  is  done  very  carefully  and  the  material  is 

panned  a  second  time  to  make  sure  that  no  gold  'is- lost.  If  gold  is 
found  in  the  second  panning  it  is  panned  again.  The  concentrate  from 
these,  pannings  are  assayed.  Thus  we  virtually  assay  the  entire  con¬ 
centrate  and  about  4?.:  of  the  total  tailings.. 

This  method  prevents  our  saving  any  of  the  concentrate  or  tailings 
sample  as  you  instructed  us  to  do.  If, you  want  a  part  of  the  concen¬ 

trate  and  tailings  saved  ar.d  sent  to  the  laboratory  we  would  like  some 
suggestion  as  to  the  method  of  obtaining  samples. 


We:have  understood  from  Mr.  Burn  that  there  is  some  question  as  to  the 
number  and  location  of  the  shafts  that  are  to  be  sunk  and  we  would  like 
definite  instructions  from  you  in  the  matter. 

In  the  meantime  via  are  sinking  a  shaft  near  the  N. 'll.  corner  of  lot 
No. 50  ,  which  is  about  midway  between  the  lines  of  old  Mexican  workings 
along  Cunningham  Arroyo  and  Arroyo  Viejo.  The  gravel  in  this  vicinity 
has  not  been  worked  at  all  nor  tested  by  Mr.  Burn. 

Accompanying  each  sheet  of  the  shaft  report  is  a  sheet  explaining  . 
the  exact  meaning  of  each  item  of  the  report. 


Shaft  #9  has  been  ran  through 
assayed. ■ . 

Shaft  #  13  has  boon  run  throu 
Shaft  #10  has  been  sized -and 
.  Shafts  #15  and  #16  are  being 
Shaft  ^#9  seems  to  be-  much  higher 
will  undoubtedly  be:  very  low  owi 
summit  of  a  ridge  of  bed-rock.  T 
you  the  results . 

As  Mr.  Burn  intends  to  have 
the-  Grant  and  as  he-  will  have  am 
beat  to  continue  the  method  of  a 
will  gi.ve  us  the-  results  of  the 
latter  we  desire  as  we  are  still 
separation.  This  will  not  delay 
In  your  letter  of  Opt.  3  you  : 


ns  with  #3.  We  would 


O  iM  ■  — 


Messrs.  Miller  &  Chapman, 


Dolores, 

New  Mexico . 

Dear  Sirs: 

About  sampling  the  holes.  Why  cant  you  slice  down  from 
top  to  bottom  6  or  8  inch  square,  take  the  whole  and  weigh,  then 
screen  down  and  take  one  sample  and  assay  it.  What  we  are  anxious 
about  here  is  to  quickly  learn  the  value  of  the  gravel  in  pits 
strung  over  the  Mesa. 

Yours  very  truly, 

Q. 


Dolores,  .  M.  Oct.  15,  1:3c C. 

Mr .  T.  A.  Edison, 

Orange,  .  T. 

Dear  Vr.  Edison 

Tho  status  of  the  work  and  the  nrotcea u  of  the  same 
since  our  last  resort  is  as  follows: - 

Shaft  irO  Has  been  assayod  and  thu  rerort  of  it  we  send  you  today. 

"  Jrlo  s&iafc  assayed. 

"  irlO  Has  been  Senaratod  and  is  being,  assayed. 

"  irl5  Sunk  ten  feet.  Total  depth  52  1/Eft. 

"  TrlS  ounk  fifteen  and  a  half  feet.  Total  depth  48ft  • 

Location  near  Lot  126  Started  Oct.  11th.  Dow:  EC  1/Sft. 
Rain  has  delayed  Lho  work  considerably  and  on  this  account  we  can 
send  you  only  a  partial  sample-  of.  Shaft  15.  Samples  of  the;  other 
shafts  have  .'been  taken  but  are  no  wet  that  they  must  be  dried  before 
weighing,. 

1  Yours  truly,  J\ 


-  '//ry/~9/i  //rr.)r/r, 

tyiMt.-u.ie6t/ii,  ft//  ty/t/tt; 

//m-tttt,  r//MA. 

■  tyfir  tyf/  Oct.  18th,  J/M’ 0. 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 

Orange,  N.J. 

Dear  Sir : 

Your  favor  of  the  15th  inst.  has  been  duly  received  and  was 
considered  at  a  meeting  of  the  Board  of  Directors  held  yesterday. 

It  is  very  hard  for  us  to  understand  how  Messrs.  Miller  and  Chapman 
can  have  arrived  at  such  a  low  result.We  think  it  ;orily  right  tell 
you  that  the  present  shafts  were  sunk  by  Mr.  Bufft  under  the  instruct¬ 
ions  which  he  understood  came  from  you  and  that  he  says  that  Miller  and 
Chapman  are  not  availing  themselves  of  his  knowledge  of  tftfr  kesa. 

We  have  spent  a  great  deal  of  money  on  the  property  already  and  we  do 
not  think  we  should  spend  any  more  unnpc»88ari'j.y,  a^d  wo  fee$.  that  wa 
must  ask  you  to  go  out  and  see  the  property  yourself, as  we  knb«  that 
in  no  other  way  can  a  result  be  arrived  at  tyfcioh  will  be  satisfactory 
to  us.  Prom  the  reports  which  have  been  shown  to  Us*w«  understand 
that  you  are  satisfied  with  the  wrking  of  the  probes,  and  now  the  only 
question  is  are  we  satisfied  with  the  process  and  the  property.  All 
the  reportB  which  we  have  had  sbpw  ji&t  the  property  Is  valuable. 

We  have  all  seen  the  property  and  think  that  in  vi#f  of  -fcfte  large  in¬ 
terest  which  you  have  in  it  you  shop^d  go  out  before  w#  go  to  any  fur* 
ther  expense. 

Burn  says  that  the  location  of  the  new  shafihis  <ralgld4 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 


the  ar®h  examined  by  him  and  Ou'trfty*  of  the  aria  Wfaiefii  We  shall  prOba* 
bly  Work.  The  ptopeHy  is  ab  ifergd  that  we  fall  sura  tHht  you  will 
never  understand  li  th<5f*i><ighly  until  you  Stave  been  there  and  examined 
11  in  person*  We  think  jrttu  should  go  WH  ad  soon  as  you  con  get  away. 
If  1r6U  will  tail  ub  when  you  6 On  go,  some  of  u»  Will  arrange  to  go  with 
you,  and  we  hope  that  It  Will  be  ae  sooh  after  Election  as  possible. 

Yours  very  truly, 


ut-" — a-^2v  (&•  &  ■«-> » 

k^J^^rTu^-L 


“tCT 


■t|  XT  ^o^e^—j 

oe  o-&.  <•--£-£.  s^-c 


aff’A  • 

'  C~A*e.^  ^  ^jc^^vzr. 


Dolores,  N.  M.  Oct.  24,  1900. 

Mr.  T.  A.  Edison, 

Orange  ,  il .  .  J  . 

Dear  Mr.  Edison s- 
Since  our  last  report. 

Shaft  IS  Has  been  assayed  and  report  we  send  you  today. 

"  10  Has  been  assayed  and  report  we  will  send  you  tomorrow. 

"  15  Sinking  has  been  discontinued  for  the  present.  Sample  has  been 

taken  as  far  as  worked.  Total  depth  521/2  ft.  Part  of  this 
shaft  has  been  sized  and  separated. 

"  16  Sunk  twelve  and  a  half  feet.  Total  depth  60  ft.  71/2  inch. 

Sampled  as  far  as  sunk. 

"  17  Sunk  thirty  six  and  a  half  feet..  Total  depth  57ft. 

Sampled  as  far  as  sunk. 

Weare  now  sinking  the  shafts  entirely  by  contract  work  paying  $1.55 
per  foot  of  depth,  which  includes  the  taking  of  the  sample.  Shaft#15 
was  sunk  to  it3  present  depth  by  day  labor.  As  this  was  so  slow  and  ex-  'i 
pensive  and  material  was  coming  in  sufficiently  fast  from  the  two  con-:  ■ 
tract  shafts,  we  decided  to  discontinue  working  15  for  the  present. 

The  method  of  taking  samples  as  suggested. in  your  letter  of  recent 
date  is  the  one  whiph  we  have  been  using  .in  taking  samples  of  15,  16, 

17,-  the  results  of  which  we  send  you  today. 

There  seems  to  be  considerable . dissatisfaction  on  the  part  of  Mr. 
Burn,  and  according  to  him,  also  Mr.  Hoyt  in  regard  to  the  condition 
and  manner  of  carrying  on  the  work,  principally  the .locationand  and. 
working  of  shafts.  We  definitely  located  the  limit  of  th4  workable  area 
with  the  advice  of  Mr.  Burn,  as  previously  reported,  and  we  sank  #17  ' 

well  this  limit,  Burn  now  0iaims  that  it  is  not  within  the 

limit  he  advised* 


Mr.  Burn  Baa  been  making  complaints  about  ,  hie  location  of . the  shafts 
right  along  and  in  consequence  we  are. very  uncertain  as  to. the. course  we 
should  follow  in  locating  the  other  shafts.  He  thinks  that  the  prospect¬ 
ing  should  be  confined  to  the  upper  part  of  the  mesa  which  he  has  exam¬ 
ined  and  feels  evident  is  sufficiently  rich.  We  understand  that  Mr. 

Hoyt  is  to  come  out  here  shortly.  Can  you  not  come  with  him  and  settle 
up  all  questions  in  regard  to  the  work? 

Would  it  not  be  well,  owing  to  the  results  so  far  obtained,  to  save 
the  expense  of  running  .the  mill  and  sinking  new  shafts  and  confine  our¬ 
selves  to  prospecting  until  we. find  workable  gravel?  In  this  prospect¬ 
ing  we  could  sample  the  old  workings,  or  shafts  which  are . scattered  over 
the  entire  mesa.  We  would  probably  have  to  do  some  further  sinking  as 
many  of  these  shafts  are  not  down  to  bedrock  and  have  been  more  or  less 
washed  in.  This  however  would  be  much  less  expensive  than  sinking  new 
shafts.  We  would  like  to  have  your  idea  as  to  the  minimum  value  for 
workable  ground. 

Hoping  to  see  you  out  here  very  soon,  we  remain. 


Messrs.  Miller  &  Chapman, 

Dolores,  New  Mexico. 

Dear  Sirs: 

Yours  of  the  24th  received.  Carry  out  instructions  about 
locating  holes.  Do  not  work  the  Mill  hut  assay  as  you  have  been 
doing  with  last  holes.  We  know  enough  about  the  Milling  part  to 
be  sure  we  can  get  the  gold  if  it  is  there;  the  only  thing  now  is 
to  ascertain  if  there  is  enough  rich  ground  to  make  it  worth  while 
to  erect  a  Mill.  I  think  it  poor  policy  to^prospect  old  holes, 
so  you  better  keep  on  as  per  instructions  until  Mr.  Hoyt  otherwise 
decides.  Ten  Cents  per  ton  of  material  excavated  as  a  general 
average  would  answer. 


Yours  very  truly, 


•yu U,C£i*u  4'CL':\ 
v{\  ft*1'' 


Thomas  A.  Bdison 
Orange ,N  ■  J  . 
Dear  3ir:- 


[I  tn\-  Dol orefs^N  Tm.'n ovf.  8 , 1900 . 


Dear  Sir:-  Since  our  last  report,  C 

Shaft  #15  is  now  being  sunk  deeper  in  order  to  get  a  sample  only 

Shaft  #16  has  been  sunk  11  ft.  Present  depth  89  ft.  This  is 
being  sunk  deeper  for  sample  only.  Part  of  the  gravel  from  this  shaft 
has  been  separated  and  is  ready  for  assay. 

Shaft  #18  near  N.W.  oor.  Lot  #15,  is  being  sunk  for  samnle. 

Shaft  #19  near  center  of  Lot  #45  "  "  "  "  » 

We  have  decided  to  confine  the.  prospecting  to  an  area  which  will 
include  all  the  ground  covered  by  the  contour  map  and  extend  one  haff 
mile  to  the  North  of  it. 

We  have  started  five  shafts  and  have  four  more  located  in  the  area 
covered  by  the  contour  map,  as  follows: 

Shaft  #15  near  N-W.oor  Lot  #50.  >  -v 

-  16  ' .  *  "•  / 

17  "  H.  side  "  145.  \\  ^  V\  y 

"  18  "  N.W.  cor.  "  IS.  St  / 

'  19  "  center  "  4s-  \  v 

"  20  in  "  105.  (Vf\  \  / 

;  :  :  :  *  0^  V 

25  ••  ••  nr.  ^ 

These  shafts  are  being  sunk  by  contract  at  the  rate  of  $1.50  per 
foot  and  the  sample  taken  by  cutting  a.  channel  down  one  side  of  the 
shaft.  About  fifty  pounds  per  foot  is  taken  out,  weighed. (stones  and 
all)  and  panned 

We  have  discontinued  the  taking  of  samples  of  old  shafts  but  are 
panning  and  assaying  those  samples  that  had  been  taken  when  we  received 


ll-jB-'.OO.  z 

The  mill  is  closed  down  as  per  instructions. 

We  would  like  to  know  whether  you  object  to  our  continuing  . 
experimental  work  on  both  sizing  and  separating,  as  there  are  several 
lines  of  experiments  that  we  would  like  to  follow  out.  We  have 
plenty  of  time  for  this  now  and  need  only  the  help  of  two  boys  and  an 
engineer. 

Respectfully  yours, 


O.M.— 

AW* 


Na*>  /  9# o 


Agreement  between  Antonio  Ballejos  and  Esau  Lopez  and  the  Galisteo 
Company,  whereby  the  said  Antonio  Ballejos  and  Esau  Lopez  agree*  to 
sink  one  shaft  to  bedrock  and  take  a  sample  of  the  same  amounting  to 
one  sack  per  foot  of  depth,  down  one  side  of  said  shaft  at  the  rate  of 
One  Dollar  and  Fifty  Cents  per  foot  of  depth.  The  work  tobe  satis¬ 
factory  to  the  engineers  of  the  Galisteo  80 . 

The  Galisteo  Company  agrees  to  furnish  all  tools  and  powder  neces¬ 
sary  in  the  sinking  of  the  said  shaft. 

Signed  this  ^  —  day  of  Jin~-  1900. 

At  flolores,  N.Mex. 


do. 

( f ^  GM.C. 


Agreement  between  Jose  Chavez  y  Muniz  and  Nicasio  Archuleta  and  the 
Galisteo  Company,  whereby  the  said  Jose  Chavez  y  Munez  and  Nicasio 
Archuleta  agree  to  sink  one  shaft  to  bedrock  and  take  a  sample  of  the 
same  ,  amounting  to  one  sack  per  foot  of  depth,  down  one  side  of  said 
shaft  at  the  rate  of  One  Dollar  and  Fifty  Cents  for  foot  of  depth. 

The  work  to  be  satisfactory  to  the  engineers  of  the  Galisteo  Co. 

The  Galisteo  Company  agrees  to  furnish  all  tools  and  powder 
necessary  in  the  sinking  of  the  said  shaft. 

Signed  this  day  of  November,  1900. 

At  Dolores,  N.Mex. 


GALISTEO  COMPANY. 

(Z) 

DOLORES,  NEW  MEXICO, . rgo . 

CL<^h-  Ltu+sCo  sJc?  Z  &4U~<.  t^£s-  / 

'Onc&u*.  <e<**~*f  ALS-tf^-  V 

SU<^<h /i^O  Jh -2/0  t* 

tfar^ <-**>  j  /A*.  _  j^A— 

^  -to.  fnhy&^i,^ 


**£  z^£J?ZZ~- 

Zr>l£^  ***  us~^£jy*sy  ^ 

<L  T /^ul  & 

us&ha,  -  v-  ^ 

,,  .rZyrft&rr-.  7&y~**~r-‘ 


'^ac-<~<^cy  - - - 


tor-. 


GALISTEO  COMPANY. 


DOLORES,  NEW  MEXICO . 


9/uJtX^,  Qe*c£szL^ ,  ft*™-* 


rtfe  -* 

ShJL  -£dzr/^-^ 

13&z£2J£\y~  *~~  *i=^ 

gl^^lS^fe: 


GALISTEO  COMPANY. 


DOLORES,  NEW  MEXICO,!.. 


|gg; 

^  „  .  ,  9  9-y-cA IZ  ~^u7XZ  -feZZZZZZ 


— 

U^tU^ 


Dolores, N.M.  Nov. 27,  1900. 


Orange,  N.J.  ' 

Dear  Sitf  Since  our  last  report  the  following  work  has  been  done* 

Shaft  #15  Large,  boulders  had  to  be  blasted  out.  No  increase  in  depth. 

"  #16  Contractor  short  of  help.  Very  little  increase  in  depth. 

"  #19  Has  been  sunk  32  1/2  ft.  Present  depth  58  1/2  ft. 

".  <*#20  Started  yesterday  in  lot  No.  102. 

71  ft. 

We  inclose  on  separate  sheets  the  results  of  assays  of  samples  of 
these  ^fts.  We  inclose  also  a  pamphlet  that  has  come  to  hand  that 
mi&ht  interest  you. 

Tie  average  value  of  all  the  new  shafts  as  far  as  at  present  pros¬ 
pected  is  5.84  cents.  In  computing  this  the  values  obtained  by  the  MilL. 
runs^tf  shafts  2,3,4,9,10,13,  and  15  were  used.  We  consider  this  an 

unfair  average  owing  to  the  fact  that  the  shafts  sunk  by  Mr.  Burn  are  so  ■ 
close  together.  We  have  therefore  taken  the  average,  of  those  shafts 
as'.the  value  of  that  locality  and  considered  this  average  as  the  value 
of  one  shaft  of  the.  proposed  twelve.  This  average  is  9.02  cents. 

Averaging  this  in  with  the  shafts  we  have  sunk  gives  a  value  so  far  of 
3.56  cents. 

Eight  of  the  twelve  shafts  are  either  finished  or  under  way  and 
the  other  four  will  be  started  as  soon  as  we  can  get  men  to  take  the 


0rn^t 


1 


Dolores,  N.  M.  Dec.  4,  1900. 


Mr.  T.  A.  Edison, 

Orange,  N.  J. 


Dear  Mr .  Edison 


Since,  our  last  report  the  following  work  has  been 

done  :- 

Shaft  #15  3enk  26  1/2  ft.  Present  depth  85  ft.  llinch. 

"  #16  Depth  111  1/2  ft.  Sinking  discontinued  for  reasons  given 

below. 


"  #19  Sunk  22  1/2  ft.  Present  depth  29  ft. 

"  #20  Sunk  to  bed-rock  Total  depth  29  ft. 

"  #21  Sunk  22  ft.  Present  depth  95  ft. 

"  #22  Location-  Near  N.  W.  corner  of  Lot  No.  120. 

Started  Nov.  28.  Present  depth  20  ft. 

"  #23  Location-  Near  N.  B.  corner  of  Lot  No.  161. 

,  Started  Dec.  3.  Present  depth  13  ft. 

"  #24  Location-  500  ft.  north  of  N.  W.  corner  of  Lot  No.  154 

Started  today. 

"  #25  Location-  Near  north  side  of  Lot  No.  1. 

Started  Nov.  30.  Present  depth  16  ft. 

The  sinking  of  shaft  #16  was  discontinued  because  we  considered 
further  sinking  useless  as  the  value  of  the  gravel  was  only  running 
one  an d-.n ine -ten  iha'.  cents.  We  should  like  to  know  whether  you  wish 
us  to  sink  this  sfiaft  and  any, other, under  similar  circumstances,  to 
bed-rock  regardless  of  the  value  of  the  gravel. 

We  have  done  no  experimental  work  in  the  mill  owing  .to  the  fact 
that  the  prospects  of  finding  workable  ground  here  is  so 


Mr.  T.  A.  Edison, 

Orange,  N.  J. 

Dear  Mr.  Edison 

Since  our  last  report  the  following  work  has  been  done:- 
Shaft  #15  Sunk  15  1/2  ft.  Present  depth  99  1/2  ft. 

#19  "  16  1/2  ft.  "  "  97  1/2  ft. 

#21  "  11  1/2  ft.  to  bed-rook.  Total  depth  104  1/2  ft. 

#22  "  22  1/2  ft.  Present  depth  42  1/2  ft. 

”  #22  -  17  ft..  •'  ••  30  ft. 

#24  "  19  1/2  ft.  "  "  19  \/z  ft. 

#25  ”  4  ft.  to  bed-rock.  Total  depth  20  ft. 

We  enclose  on  a  separate  sheet  the  values  of  the  shafts  so  far  as 
prospected. 


We  hope  to  be  through  with  these  shafts  within  two  weeks  at  the 
longest  and  would  like  to  know  whether  there  will  be  any  more  work 
for  us  here  when  these  are  finished.  If  this  completes  our  work  shall 
we  ship  back  the  separator,  screens,  motors,  etc.  which  we  consider 
would  come  in  handy  at  the  Laboratory? 

Ther^are  a  few  items  in  your  original  instructions  which  we  have 
not  followed  out  as  yet,  which,  undez;  the  present  circumstances,  we 
hardly  deem  necessary.  We  call  your  attention  to  the  fact  however  and 
ask  whether  you  wish  us  to  carry  out  all  of  them. 

We  are  both  very  anxious  to  take  a  trip  through  Arizona  and  old 
Mexico  before  returning  east  and  would  like  to  know  whether  you  have 
any  objection  to  our  doing  so. 

Hoping  to  hear  from  you  very  soon 


,  we  remain , 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Dolores,  N.  M.  Dec.. 18,  1900. 


Mr*  T.  A.  Edison, 

Orange ,  N .  J. 

Dear  Mr.  Edison 


According  to  your  instructions  the  work  on  Cunning¬ 
ham  Mesa  has  been  stopped,  with  the  shafts  in  the  following  condition :- 
.  Shaft  #15  112  ft.  to  bedrock. 

Ill  1/2  ft.  deep  not  to  bedrock. 


#16 

#17 

#18 

#19 

#20 

#21 

#22 

#23 

#24 

#25 


76 


113 


104  1/2  ’ 
59 

37  1/2  ' 


The  last  results  of  assays  are  inclose.d  on  a  separate  sheet.  .We 
also  inclose  map  of  the  Cunningham  Mesa  with  the  shafts  which  we  have 
sunk  plainly  marked  and  opposite  each  one  the  depth  and  value  of  same. 

It  has  been  decided  that  John  will  return  to  the  Laboratory  and. will 
leave  here  Sunday  night.  *  • 

We  have  taken  the  privilege  of  going  on.  a  t*ip  to  Grand  Canon  Ariz. 
for  three  days,  before  John's  return.  We  hope  that  this  will  meet 
with  your  approval. 

We  have  started  work  on  the  Carachie.  placer  and  inclose  the  com¬ 
bined  result  of  a  number  of  small  samples  taken  when  we  examined  the 
ground  roughly.  This  is  }ust  a  preliminary  sample. 


We  have  outlined  in  red  on  the  accompanying  map  an  area  that  we 
think  might  average  IS  cts.  per  yd.  The  small  inclosed  area  to  be  ex¬ 
cluded.  This  gives  an  area  of  about  10  squares  and  at  an  average  depth 
of  30  ft.  would  give  *2,800^000  cu.  yds. 

This  estimate  must  necessarily  be  more  or  less  guess  work  on  ac¬ 
count  of  the  very  uneven  distribution  of  the  shaft*  within  the  area. 

We  consider  this  a  liberal  estimate. 

Yours  truly, 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Mr. Thomas  A. Edison, 
Orange  ,N .  J. 
Dear  3ir:- 


3inoe  our  report  of  Dec. 18  five  shafts  have  been  sunk 


Maps  of  the  work  done  bothj>n  Carachie  and  Golden  Placers  will  foli> 
low  as  soon  as  completed. 


Dolores  ,N  .M .  De'c^/l ,  19po . 


Rei 


[FROM  JOHN  V.  MILLER  &  CLOYD 


t.  CHAPMAN] 


At  the  request  of  Mr.  Edison  we  report  as  follows  on  the 
work  at  Dolores,  New  Mexico,  the  methods  employed,  the  efficiency 
of  the  process  and  the  results  obtained  by  mill  tests  and  samples 
assayed. 

We  arrived  at  Dolores,  Neb.  9th  1900  and  found  the  exca¬ 
vation  of  the  Mill  only  partially  completed.  The  first  two  months 
were  comsumed  in  erecting  the  building  and  another  month  in  in¬ 
stalling  the  machinery.  A  preliminary  run  of  the  entire  Mill 
was  made  May  7th. 

The  gravel  from  the  Mill  excavation  whioh  had  been  soreened 
to  one  half  inch  and  saved  was  used  in  making  preliminary  tests  of 
the  process. 

On  Aug.  15th  work  was  begun  on  the  shafts  sunk  by  Mr. 

Burn  at  the  head  of  the  mesa  for  the  Mill  tests. 

The  method  used  in  conducting  the  Mill  tests  was  as  follows: 
At  the  shaft  all  the  material  was  divided  into  seven  sizes  as  follows 
Mill  size  or  under  l/8",  l/S"  to  l/2",  l/2"  to  1%  1"  to  2",  2"  to4", 
4"  to  12"  and  rocks  over  12".  Each  size  was  weighed  and  the  Mill 
size  was  also  measured  by  volume. 

The  Mill  size  was  then  taken  to  the  Mill,  (dried  when 
necessary)  and  soreened  into  the  following  sizes,  Under  .007", 

,007"to  .015",  .015"  to  .029",  .029"  to  .059",  .059»to  .074", 

.074"  to  .094",  .094"  to  .119",  .119"  to  .125".  Each  of  these  sizes 
was  weighed  and  then  separated. 

The  concentrate  obtained  was  weighed,  the  iron  magneti¬ 
cally  removed,  the  remaining  concentrate  weighed,  carefully  panned 
down  and  this  final  oonoentrat'e  assayed  by  fire. 

The  weight  of  the  tailings  was  taken  as  the  difference 
between  the  total  weight  of  material  of  each  size  run  and  the 
concentrate  obtained. 

A  sample  of  these  tailings  amounting  to  about  70  lbs.  per 
ton  was  automatically  and  continuously  taken  during  the  run,  weighed 
oarefully  panned  down  and  the  concentrate  of  this  assayed  by  fire.  Thus 
values  of  each  size  of  gravel  were  obtained  and  the  weight  of 


(2) 


the  total  gold  in  the  gravel  as  it  lay  in  the  ground  was  calculated. 

Table  No.  1  contains  the  general  results  of  the  shaftB 
run  through  the  Mill. 

It  is  only  necessary  to  look  over  the  column  showing  the 
percentage  of  g.old  saved  on  Table  No.  1  to  get  a  clear  idea  of  the 
high  efficiency  of  the  process. 

About  Nov.  1st  according  to  instructions  from  Mr.  Edison, 
the  Mill  was  closed  down  and  work  was  confined  to  prospecting 
Cunningham  Mesa  by  sinking  and  sampling  eleven  new  shafts,  covering 
about  one  and  a  half  square  miles.  These  shafts  were  sunk  to  bed 
rook,  samples  taken  by  cutting  a  ohannel  down  one  side  of  the  shaft 
large  enough  to  take  out  about  fifty  pounds  of  gravel  per  foot  of 
depth.  The  total  sample  thus  taken  was  weighed,  oarefully  panned 
and  the  concentrate  assayed  by  fire. 

Samples  were  also  taken  from  Ritchie  Hill,  the  Thousand 
foot  Tunnel  and  shafts  A.  and  B.  Although  the  Thousand  foot  Tunnel 
showed  the  high  average  of  55  l/2  cents,  yet  the  average  value  from 
surface  to  bed  rock  of  the  gravel  in  that  immediate  vicinity  as  shown 
by  shaft  A.  whioh  almost  passes  through  the  tunnel  is  only  11  cents. 

This  high  value  of  the  tunnel  may  be  accounted  for  by  the 
faot  that  it  followed  a  rich  streak.  Shaft  B.  which  is  only  a  Bhort 
distance  away  and  which  showed  a  very  much  lower  value  sustains  this 
opinion.  The  results  of  these  shafts  are  tabulated  in  Table  No.  2. 

From  these  results  arid  the  Mill  test,  it  is  computed  that 
there  is  2,800,000  oubic  yards  at  the  head  of  the  Mesa  which  oarries 
15  cents  per  yard.  However  this  is  a  very  liberal  estimate  and 
gives  the  Mesa  the  benefit  of  the  doubt  in  every  direction.  With  a 
Mill  of  24000  tons  capacity  per  day  this  would  furnish  gravel  for 
only  six  months. 

About  Dec.  18th  work  on  Cunningham  Mesa  was  discontinued 
and  prospecting  was  commenced  on  the  Caraohie  placer.  Five  new 
shafts  were  sunk  and  sampled,  and  one  shaft  which  Mr.  Burn  had  sunk 
was  sampled.  The  values  of  these  shafts  were  obtained  by  the 
method  used  in  Cunningham  Mesa.  Table  No.  3  gives  the  result  of 


(3) 


this  section. 

This  placer  is  of  a  small  area,  probably  thirty  acres, 
and  very  shallow  and  the  average  value  2.2  cents  shows  it 
practioally  worthless. 

Following  the  work  in  the  Caraohie  placer  the  Golden 
Placer  was  prospeoted.  Eight  samples  were  taken  in  this  section, 
only  one  of  them  being  from  a  new  shaft,  the  remainder  were  old 
workings.  In  these  oases  the  face  of  the  gravel  was  removed  to 
a  depth  of  six  inches  down  one  side  of  the  working  before  cutting 
the  channel  for  the  sample.  These  samples  were  taken  and  treated 
as  described  above. 

Table  No.  4  contains  these  results.  This  placer  though 
of  considerable  area,  perhaps  one  square  mile,  lies  principally 
outside  the  Grant  and  the  results  which  are  from  the  portion 
within  the  grant  show  it  to  be  of  too  low  grade  for  consideration. 


ZZ/-Z/L JSJ&ae. -j££ZiL i  X3&  9jz.?£ Z£3Ul<L  s.^*  ✓.< .*«* 

'———  -3Z24*. _*£<£.£ _ 2&1& ir&24_  __Z_Zj£-  /*** 

'*'"  ^  ZLZZjL zzzl&z.  — <gz_i sjlzl. _ '$&. _ ra./Z^Zf?  •  ^  -**d  ?j* 


—  ' . i&f-AZ. ggZao  ZJ2jL^/£&Z£_  _Z£±- _ %t*&  /ZZgj^  „  .74  /Z.J~Z  **&jk 

^■/3  JSAZJL3  ZOjLZA.  4L3~  S?3_ _ 3  a  ftf.oZ  **•  £'/S  _ _ /  &£  *  Z.  6  Z  /Jf 


^^f\z&sAsy<rj  a  /J~?  ■  \  .r/zz  j?z/ 


#U//j  z±A 


<TA33  //£  /fV  \S'f.  /A 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Shafts. 

#15 

#16 

#17 

#18 

#19 

#20 

#21 

#22 


.5 

1.7 


#24  .6 

#25  3.4 

Average.  2.4 


A.  11.0 

B.  3.0 
1000  ft.  Tunnel  55.4 
Ritchie  Hill  4.3 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Tawle  Ho.  3. 
Caraohie  Placer. 


Assayi 

Shaft  Ho. 

K.  1 
K.  2 
K.  3 
K,.  4 
K.  5 
K.  6 
Total 


of  Samples  of  Shafts. 

Value  per  ton 
of  gravel, 

1.55  cents 

0.21  " 

1.71  ” 

3.17  " 

2.48  " 

•0,34  " 

2.15  "  Average  Value. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


Sample  No. 

G.  1 
G.  2 
G.  3  ■ 

G.  4 
G.  5 
G.  6 
G.  7 
G.8 
Total. 


Ta-ble  #4. 

Golden  Placer. 

Value  per  ton 
of  gravel, 

4.63  cents 
1.  " 

0.35  " 

3,43  " 

1.59  » 

6.41  " 

11.81  " 

3.22  "  Average  Value. 


1900.  Motion  Pictures  (D-00-15) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  the 
commercial  and  technical  development  of  motion  pictures.  Many  items 
concern  the  Klondike  Exposition  Co.,  which  was  organized  to  make  a  filming 
expedition  to  the  Yukon  to  produce  films  suitable  for  display  at  the  Paris 
Exposition  of  1900.  Included  is  an  undated  memorandum  in  Edison's  hand 
regarding  the  imperfect  quality  of  the  negatives  produced.  Other  documents 
pertain  to  Edison's  suit  against  William  N.  Selig  and  to  the  proposed  sale  of 
Edison's  motion  picture  business  to  the  American  Mutoscope  and  Biograph  Co. 
Among  the  correspondents  are  William  E.  Gilmore,  vice  president  and  general 
manager  of  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Co.,  and  James  H.  White,  manager  of 
the  Film  Department. 

Approximately  90  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  The 
items  not  selected  include  duplicates  and  drafts  of  selected  documents. 


Thomas  Crahon,  Esq.,  Kanagor , 

Klondike  Exposition  Co., 

Cumbridgeport,  Mass. 

Dear  Sir: 

Confirming  our  conversation,  I  desire  to  ma'-.o  the  following 
proposition,  "based  upon  your  statement  that  the  Klondike  Exposition 
Co.  has  expended  to  date  Seventy-three  Hundred  and  Eighty-five  hol¬ 
lars  ($7385)  in  procuring  films  of  different  scenes  in  the  Klondike 
country: 

lot.  That  I  will  furnish  projecting  machines  and  positive  films 
from  the  negatives  that  have  been  furnished  by  you  up  to  an  amount,  for 
ouch  machines  and  positive  films,  of  Seventy- three  Hundred  and  Eighty- 
five  Dollars  ($7385),  such  films  being  estimated  at  twenty  cents  (20 fl) 
per  lineal  foot,  and  the  machines  to  be  furnished  at  a  price  not  to 
exceed  Two  Hundred  Dollars  ($200)  each. 

2nd.  The  machines  and  positive  films  to  remain  my  property  and 
be  under  ray  control,  subject  to  their  use  for  exhibiting  as  now  contem¬ 
plated. 

3rd.  That  the  net  receipts  from  exhibiting  such  machinery  and  posi¬ 
tive  films  shall  bo  equally  divided  between  the  Klondike  Exposition  Co. 
and  myself. 

4th.  You  to  receive  a  salary  of  Sixty  Dollars  ($60)  per  week  and 
expenses,  same  to  be  deducted  before  any  net  profits  are  disbursed. 


1/16/1900. 


PHONOGRAPH  DICTATION. 

•  Thomas  Orahan,  Mgr. 


5th.  In  case  any  extra  films  are  to  he  supplied,  to  keep  eaoh  out¬ 
fit  complete,  such  films  are  to  he  paid  for  in  cash  at  a  rate  not  to 
excood  twenty  oents  (20 /)  per  lineal  foot,  the  amount  of  same  to  he 
deducted  before  ary  net  profits  are  disbursed. 

This  arrangement  can  be  abrogated  by  either  you  or  myself  upon  giv¬ 
ing  six  months  written  notice,  but  so  long  as  this  understanding  shrill 
stand  it  shall  be  a  substitute  for  the  contract  dated  the  14th  day  of 
March,  1899,  and  not  otherwise. 


Yours  very  truly, 


[ATTACHMENT] 


1^6-0  n>/  '  ' 


S\  c  '  ' 

L-'-y  s- 1  *'  (Tv— ^  • —  - 

/^)  £  c<--^  zdciw'  • 

.  L- (a^--  ]C o'- 


p^d>\b  <■  ^  '  bL.|3  . , 

W^cvr-.v“tT-td'^C . rCLo  fcC^U 

^GrXZZ  C.  ^ 


|>>-od£,  Z^LA^-^LJ <" 

fZt^Z^-hd 


)t  /?  IIwa^.1  _  &au~*-*  Qt-tCZZ  •-’.. 


4^;^°  - t> 


[ATTACHMENT] 

'2-. 

■  c,'i  2o 

?jk.i,--  W-  ^  te-K  i\^f'' 

"  C  d  ' 


[ATTACHMENT! 


,ffL 

■ 


a 


W  fW  ,A-$  0 '  C . t . AJ-C- . 

--s  f1  £ 

7  -  0  ^.uJLJJ^r 


^ptias  v  , 

fSfA.  fc-A 

,  C>,.A  '  t ,...  a^l~y  ■ 
—  <?  ^  ^  -t-. '  5<.A,  "t7  -<U1 

ja^elP  :  a_ 

AxAAAX  __ 

/?  _/_ >,-  *  •  ^ 

^ uo  ’  •' 


CLXX^~^  b-~t. — - 


^ ,J&  j£^~L — j|  ^ 


[ATTACHMENT] 


'<^X^V\A.  - - 


et^T- 


Z  6  cuj£<>  _ 


\j,Od>  , 


^tp-cCJ  <I-\.  c\$JLo  tXc.  -^z. 


dd  JOt  - — - 

T' *  '•/_  fc>; 


vi 


Mr,  Thomas  A,  Edison, 

Orange,  IT,  J. 

Dear  Sir:- 

In  reply  to  y<mr  latter  of  January  16th  I  beg  to  say 
that  the  proposition  is  accepted. 

Yours  very  truly, 


A//Az^ca^? 

Manager  Klondike  Exposition  Co 


fYVoJ-cov,-  p,  cJ^ka, 


9?uAaj*€JY2)yfr. 
Satnttef GJStonotu ifr. 

/>ttn/c  ZS)tytr. 


States' (SffltCfJ 

</ 

; ^tw-6r:(Qtfai0n<dj  titlty-erf 

^  ‘  '''£  .■  £$z/en/  ^aceJeJ, 

3tJ£M*w$£k*a: 

February  1,  1900. 


Sat/rjfA WrefJ 
“IfmermJH n-Kntx 


J.  F.  Randolph,  Esq., 

Care  Edison  Laboratory t 
Orange,  _: 

My  dear  Mr.  Randolph: - 


I  shall  want  to  take  your  testimony  in  the  kinetograph 
case  on  Saturday  morning  at\en  o'clock.  I  have  concluded  to 
cover  the  following  points  byVour  testimony: - 

(1)  T  shall  want  you  to  testify  from  the  time-sheets 
from  February  1,  1889,  to  February  1,  1890,  giving  week  by  week 
the  names  of  workmen  who  worked  on  the  kinetoscope  and  their 
time.  This  should  includevthe  work  on  the  photograph  building 
in  August,  September  and  October,  1889,  but  T  would  like  to  have 
you  distinguish  between  the  woVk  on  the  photograph  building  and 
the  work  on  the  kinetoscope  its< 

(2)  Since  the  time  of/Dickson  and  Brown  was  not  charged 
against  the  kinetoscope  until  the  week  ending  June  27,  1889,  but 
both  those  men  had  time  against/ the  photographing  room^  I  shall 
ask  you  a  separate  question  wMch  will  require  you  to  give  the 
time  of  Brown  and  Dickson  charged  against  the  photographing  room 
from  February  1,  1889,  down /to  June  27,  1889. 

(3)  J  shall  wantVyou  to  testify  as  to  the  date  when 
the  first  commercial  kinetoscope  was  sent  out  from  the  Laborato¬ 
ry,  viz.,  April  6,  1894. 


(4)  As  I  underbid  it,  within  a  week  or  two  after 

these  first  kinetoscopes  irfere\ent  out,  the  account  was  turned 
over  from  the  Laboratory  to  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Company  or 
some  other  concern.  / T  shall  wantNttiat  fact  stated  and  the  date 
given.  l/  \  \ 

(5)  If  your  Books  show  the  total,  T  shall  want  you 
to  give  the  total  amount  wVch  Mr.  Edison  spent  on  the  kineto- 
scope,  kinetograph  and  other\ccounts  relating  to  the  same  indus¬ 
try,  down  to  the  time  the  business  was  turned  over  to  the  Edison 
Manufacturing  Company  in  the  sprite:  of  1894. 

We  will  take  this  testimony  in  your  room,  so  that  you 
will  not  have  to  carry  any  papers  downstairs.  T  wish  you  would 

also  say  to  Mr.  Edison  and  to  Mr.  Fred  Ott  that  I  shall  want  to 
put  them  again  on  the  stand  for  a  question  or  two  after  finishing 
with  you. 


AAy-  •  p^^‘t-1 A/A  AA~ 

i2sd&Xc*it-C^  /£~  -tn^AeovS  AAc  ~^?£&40<A  /AAz'JC^.c^  tfiyzu 

-^Cc^z,^-  A.  ?'*c  r*is  9tfus-x/0t?<y£  -?*L^f'/~-'  iJ' *z  X/z-jr  A^r 

A^U, 7  /iOzry7-^t-<~f'  SU'tsssZ'  l/A  z&CC^d  A^iA  ‘&7T> 

^Tsi/ircAt-^2.  &AtAi~y  n&^mAsA  ,2/  ~aA.^^A  fi-A  ^i-o 


^istsl/cAL-yZ  ^e&st'O  ZsAtA^g  yAmAsA 
’2^<j  jC'f  &~y~z?A  A  A2Ao 
■^t/A^ucAa  Z^o  A^utsZi  & 


y-/A  . ...  y 


&yy&  s^?  jz&t^y-  /AA^/  ^>?  7/~£p< 

cyAc^yy  /u  Ct?{  /A-o-. 


AAAi  //Ar^tCCatsA  ?zcy  yALcis^Pitjs  , 


a-anrz-A  puozAALcy 


-^^Lcsisljlo  y^-v-tfC  *-*>  &A  <ds/acAtzA'  t^^ArZs  tA^Aoj^yA-^ 

yA^is  <£6i^2-cs  ^~cz^/  eAA- —  yyfo  ^Ar^z-^<^y-~  £?ist^ tz^^'yy&G 

^A-^z^c/2Z4'^.ts<7  yAA 'zyA^~  aa~c  zAA^^Asc^yA^  yUssOy, 

aaA  ^AyzA-t^y-  yy  #aaA-t-p  ^yAmy^A  ^t^s  Ta^uL^oc-^^AA^ 

£j^nr&is2*>y  “  aAaA^^zz <3  AAc  A2A^.c^ <j  tz&tsts/y  aaAlj 

^Aco^AA  /A  7z*-xs  cyAAy  _  &&£CyCy-zcj  A^AA^jjAyiy 
yyAz^?  ?&zstisy2y  -z-Tusn^^  ty2  ^yAA^  y  /%Ay~ 

^yyAy^yy-^  yA  -^-^yy  <&yAt>  yAAy 


z*z4  zAA  £4**<~<-c/  z^o  — *£jiAty2y 

C'trs.cytAtx^yf  .  ,-v=cv  ^  ^ 
z/^  jAAz**)  VC.  yyits  TTrTrzcyy 

'p-^c^y~  ^2y  7z*c>  2*&AAz>  AAA~  AAAtLc 


AccAy~  'i^z<j  Ay. 


I  understand  Mr.  Reiehenbaeh  has  had  some  interviews  with 


yourself  and  Mr.  Gillmore  relative  to  the  projected  union  of  interests 
in  the  moving  picture  field.  During  your  absence  I  had  the  pleasure  of 
an  interview  with  Mr.  Gillmore  on  this  subject.  I  have  been' informed  by 
Mr.  Reiehenbaeh  this  morning  of  your  return  and  that  Mr.  Gillmore  has  : 
informed  him  that  he  can  have  an  interview  with  you  for  a  furthei’ 
discussion  of  this  matter  some  time  ndxt  week;  in  the  meantime,  as  you’ 
are  doubtless  aware,  your  attorneys  have  been  pushing  the  suit  against 
our  Company  as  vigorously  as  possible,  and  I  am  informed  by  our 
attorneys  that  the  testimony  in  the  case  on  both  sides  has  now  been 
completed.  I  am  informed  that  Mr.  Dyer,  acting  under  your  instructions, 
is  pushing  the  case  as  rapidly  as  possible  and  is  endeavoring  to  arrange 
to  bring  it  to  trial  during  the  month  of  May.  Of  course  if  you  insist 
upon  forcing. this  suit  to  an  issue  at  that  time,  our  attorneys  must 
immediately  proceed  with  the  preparation  of  their  brief  for  the  defence. 
The  preparation  of  this  case  for  trial  will  involve  ns  both  in  expense 
which  will  be  useless  if  we  are  to  come  to  nn  amicable  agreement.  If 
you  have  any  idea  of  the  feasibility  of  such  a  combination,  would  it  not 
be  to  the  interest  of  us  both  to  suspend  hostilities  in  the  suit 
until  we  can  have  time  to  negotiate  this  matter  and  come  to  a  definite 


Mr.  Thomas  A.  Mi  son 


-2- 


Mar.  2?,  1900 


understanding  in  reference  thereto?  As  the  time  is  too  short  to  admit 
of  delay  on  the  part  of  oiir  attorneys  if  they  must  present  this  case  in 
May,  would  it  not  be  a  Good  plan  to  direct  our  attorneys  to  stipulate 
that  this  case  50  over  until  Pall,  thus  avoidinc  ;m  outlay  that  would 
prove  wasteful  if  we  should  be  able  to  come  tocether,  as  seems  probable. 
OonsiderinG  that  the  time  is  so  short  that  days  now  count,  I  would  be 
Greatly  obi iced  if  you  would  communicate  your  decision  in  this  matter 
to  me  by  telephone  on  receipt  of  thi's  letter. 

HNM/DBG 


Very  truly  yours, 

/ZZf/'sVZ 
/{4  Zv. 

2nd  Vice  President 


AGREEMENT  made  this  eleventh,  day  of  April,  Nineteen 
Hundred,  between  s 

THOMAS  A.  KDBSON,"  trading  under  the  firm  name  and 
style  of  the  EDISON  MANUFACTURING  COMPANY,  of  Orange,  Hew 
Jersey,  hereinafter  oalled  "The  Vendor",  firBt  party  and 

THE.  AMERICAN  MUTOSCOPE  AND  BIOGRAPH  COMPANY,  herein¬ 
after  sailed  "The  Purchaser"  second  party  t 
WITNESSETH  : 

In  consideration  of  the  payment  by  the  pur¬ 
chaser  to  the  vendor  of  the  sum  of  Twenty  Hive  Hundred  Hollars 
(#2600)  at  and  upon  the  execution  and  delivery  of  this 
oontraot,  it  is  hereby  mutually  covenanted  ae  follows  i 

FIRST  s  The  vendor  hereby  agrees  to  sell,  assign  ■ 
and  set  over  to  the  purchaser  at  any  time  upon  written  de¬ 
mand,  within  ninety  dayB  from  the  date  hereof,  as  a  going 


concern,  the  business  for  'tie  United  States  and  Canada 


carried  on  by  the  vendor  known  as  his  kinetosoope  and  p¥o#ewt- 
i^c-kv-o' 4r  {L 

-ing  business,  together  with  the  business  £ers*he  manufacturing,  t 

A  .  .  ;  • 

developing,  printing  and  selling  tW  films,  as  the  same  is  and 
has  been  oonduoted  by  him,  together  with  all  patents  for  the 
United  States  and  Canada  on  kinetosoopes  and  kine  tographs, 
together  with  all  patents  for  the  United  States  and  Canada  for 
the  manufacturing,  developing  and  printing  of  films  and  all 
applications  for  patents  upon  klnetosoopsB,  kine tographs  and 
projecting  apparatus  suitable  for  use  in  the  moving  picture 

business  which  the  same  vendor  may  personally  have  now 

•'  '  a; 

ponding  in  the  Patent  Office  at  Washington^  together  with 

an  assignment  of  any  and  all  of  said  patents  or  applications 
therof or.  Which  may  bo  held  in  trust  for  him,  or  to  whioh  he  , 

I  '  M W  tic  ICv/tii)  Sfi ik.  ttiifj*, 

'  nay  bo  equitably  entitled, :  together  with  all  copyrights^  on 

films  and  also  the  trade  names,  Edison  Kinetosoope  and 


Ed lBon  Klnetograph,  and  the  good  will  of  the  said  business  ) 


together  with  the  a took  on  hand  of  the  vendor,  eonoisting  of 
kinetosoopes  and  kinetographB,  printing  maohinery,  finished 
and  in  prooeaa  of  manufacture,  also  films,  film  stock  and 
negatives. 

All  of  said  property  the  vendor  hereby  covenants 


shall  he  free  and  clear  of  all  liens,  charges  and  enoumhranoes 
Whatsoever,  save  a  certain  contract  with  the  Klondike  Expos¬ 
ition  Co.,  by  Thomas  Crahan,  Manager,  dated  January  16th, 


a  oopy  of  which  is  hereto  'annexed,  and  a  contract  made  with 

the  American  Parlor  Kinetosoope  Co.,  of  Washington,  D.  c., 

a  oopy  of  which  Is  also  hereto  annexed.  «&***  j 

iS^hvct) '  '&tdLi  bt  *U|  -«• 

y  The  consideration  for  said  Bale  shall  be  the  sum  of 
;  Three  Hundred  Thousand  hollars  ($300,000)  In  cash,  the 

'Twenty-five  hundred  dollars  ($2,600)  paid  hereon  being  ored- 

&<XuL  .  . 

;ited  upon  the  seste  amount,-  and  also  a  sum  not  to  exceed 


the  sum  of  Thirty  Thousand  Dollars  ($30,000)  in  oaah,  the  same 
to  he  computed  from  the  hook  oost  to  vendor  of  the  stook  and 
property,  other  than  patents,  applications  and  copyrights 
herein  referred  te,  exoept  that  in  computing  the  said  sum  the 
negatives  shall  he  taken  at  the  price  of  Twenty-five  Dollars 
($25)  for  eaoh  negative.  Should  the  total  of  said  hook 
valuations  and  the  negatives  at  said  price,  he  less  than  the 
sum  of  Thirty  Thousand  Dollar b  ($30,000)  in  oash,  then  suoh 
less  sum  shall  he  paid  to  the  vendor  hy  the  purchaser,  within 
ninety  days  from  the  exercise  of  this  option. 

In  addition  thereto,  the  purchaser  shall  puy  the 
sum  of  Pive  Thousand  dollars  ($5,000)  per  annum  for  the  term  of 
twelve  years  from  the  date  of  the  said  sale,  and  the  pur- 
ohaser  shall  eovenant  with"  the  vendor  that  no  dividend  of  any 
kind  shall  he  paid  upon  the  capital  stook  of  the  purchaser. 

'vJr 

or  designee  before  the  prior  payment  of  the  said  yearly  payment; 


of  Fire  Thousand  Dollars  ($8,000),  shall  have  been  made,  to  the 
vendor  during  any  year  of  said  term. 

ihe  purchaser  shall  execute  to  the  vendor  a  proper 
instrument  pledging  all .patents  and  patent  righto  for  the 
United  States  and 


to  he  assigned  to  it  by  the  vendor  under  thiB  oontraot  as 
security  for  the  payment  provided  for  in  this  olauoe. 


\a» 

TOA=apgtfcai  '  ‘ 


If  the  patent^  fcsd^  number^ 


Shall  be  sustained 


hy  the  Courts  of  the  United  States,  by  a  final  deeree  after  a 
trial  upon  the  merits  thereof,  then,  and  in  that  event,  or  if 
.in  three  yearsfrom  the  date  hereof , no  decision  shall  be 
.  rendered  in  a  suit  in  said  Courts  involving  the  validity  of  said  ' 
patents,  the  purohaBer  shall  pay  to  the  vendor  an  additional 
sum  of  Twenty  thousand  dollars  ($20,000)  in  cash  j  and  if  , 


at  -the  expiration  of  five"  years  from  the  date  of  this  oontraot 
the  said  patent  shall  not  have  been  successfully  attacked  and 
a  Judgment  or  deoree  rendered  hy  a  United  States  Court 
against  the  eaid  patent,  then  and  in  that  event,  at  the 
expiration  of  said  five  (6)  years,  the  pur chaser  shall  pay  to 
the  vendor  an  additional  sum  of  Twenty  thousand  Dollars 
($20,000)  in  cash. 

In  oase  of  the  purchase  of  the  property  oovered  hy 
this  oontraot,  then  contemporaneously  therewith,  the  vendor 


kinetoaoopes,  klnetograph'ii  films,  or  projecting  aaohinery, 
used  or  capable  of  being  uesed  in  the  moving  picture  business, 
or  in  the  business  of  kinetoscopy,  except  in  the  State  of 
H-evada  and  Wyoming.  This  covenant  shall,  however,  terminate  and 
be  severally  and  separately  void  upon  the  failure  of  the 
purchaser  for  sixty  days  after  the  same  shall  become  due  to 
pay  the  Five  Thousand  Dollars  ($6,000)  hereinabove  provided 


for,  at  the  expiration  of  any  year  for  twelve  years  as 


hereinbefore  provided, 

'  7110  vendor  will  act  as  a  director  of  the  purchaser, 

or  any  corporation  of  good  business  standing  which  may  take 


tai*  over  the  property  herein  contracted  for,  and  especially 
oovenants  to  give  his  testimony  in  sustaining  the  patents 
herein  agreed  to  be  assigned  and  to  assist  as  far  as  possible 
in  obtaining  the  testimony  of  his  employees  to  that  end,  " 
and  to  exercise  all  due  and  reasonable  diligence  to  cooperate 


with  the  purchaser  to  sustain  the  said  patents  j  and  that 
he  will  do  nothing  to  prevent  the  same  from  being  sustained, 
or  aet  in  any  way  hostile  to  the  said  patents.  And  that, 
the  vendor  will  not  directly  or  indireotly,  attaok  or  assist 
in  the  attack  of  and  upon  any  patents,  which  the  purchaser 
now  owns  or  controls,  or  whioh  may  be  hereafter  owned  and 
controlled  by  them  relating  to  the  art  of  moving  pictures. 

The  vendor  will  also  turn  over  all  papers  relating 
to  the  said  business  and  the  said  suit  upon  the  said  patentB 
now  in  litigation,  and  will  permit  his  attorney  Ur.  Blohard 
N.  Dyer,  to  aid  in  sustaining  the  said  patents. 

The  vendor  further  covenants  that  he  will  forth¬ 
with  instruct  his  attorney  to  enter  an  order  adjourning,  the 
litigation  now  pending  between  the  vendor  and  the  pur¬ 
chaser  affeoting  said  patents  hereinabove,  referred  to  and 
v .until  the  Ball  Term  of  the  United  States  Circuit  Court,  and 


fiat  the  said  adjournment  Shall  be  made. 


■  L/i  iUat 

The  vendor  hereby  oovenantsAexoept  as  herein  set 
forth,  ItaMi  he  has  not  sold,  lioensed,  leased  or  parted  with, 
any  kinetographio  oamera,  or  any  right  of  ,xni  in  and  to  the 
patent*  herein  oontraoted  to  he  assigned,  which  would  deprive 
the  purchaser  of  the  exo lustre  right  to  manufacture,  uee  or 
noil  kinetographlo  oameras,  or  the  picture  hearing  alipa 
produced  therewith,  and  that  he  has  a  full  right  to  assign 
and  convey  the  rights  herein  purported  to  he  assigned  and 

conveyed. 

This  oontraot  shall  he  and  he  considered  to  he  an 


#10 


respectively)  as  fully  as  .though  they  had  executed  these 
presents* 

XH  WITHESSS  TOBHgOff  the.. vendor  haB  hereunto  set  hie 
hand  and  seal,  and  the  second  party  has  caused  those  presents 
to  he  sealed  and  exeouted  hy  Its  officer  thereunto  duly 
authorised,  the  day  and  year  first  above  written, 

SIGHED,  SEALED  AHD  HELIVERSD 

IH  THE  EBESEHCE  OS  I  •  • 

AS  TO  :  .... 

AS  TO  S 


With  reference  to  the  snail  Parlor  machine  I  would 
say  that  I  will  within  a  vory  short  period  send  to  Plr.  Gilmore  for 
your  joint  examination  a  rather  primitive  model  of  the  machine. 

Probably  the  most  interesting  feature  of  the  idea  is  that  it  is 
not  necessary  to  \ise  the  eloctrio  arc  for  the  projection  of  tho  pio 
ture.If  you  will  take  a  Blokam  projector  arid  place  it  in  one  end  of 
a  small  dark  box,  placing  at  the  other  end  a  piece  of  white  paper 
opal  glass ,  or  any  other  suitable  material  on  which  to  project  a 
picture  using  either  a  small  bicycle  lamp  or  a  sixteen  c.  p.  incan¬ 
descent  lamp  you  will  find  a  vory  satisfactory  result.  Yon  will 
not  only  get  a  picture  which  is  much  larger  than  the  Hutoscope  but 
it  will  have  much  more  interest.  It  has  more  life.  A  machino 
can  be  cheaply  made  utilising  this  method  and  by  using  films  the 
size^uaetl  in  the  Biokam  would  bring  the  apparatus  within  the  price 
oi  the  ordinary  user.  _ghere^_we  have  projected  through  the  opal 
glass  we  have  had  the  about  six  by  nine  inches.  A  coin-op¬ 

erated  machino  can  also  as  you  can  readily  see  be  made  to  use  this 
method.  With  kind  rogards, 


Type  "Q"  Cel  I, 

capacity  (50 AMPERt hours  Orange,  N.  J.,  June  15th, 1900. 

Mr.  Alex  Werner, 

•:  Oranee,  N.  J., 

Dear  Sir;- 

Respecting  the  experimental  work  you  propose  doing  on  animated  . 
picture  and  lantern  slide  colored  photography,  we  beg  to  submit  the 
following  proposition: 

You  are  to  enter  our  employ  on  Monday,  June  11th,  1900  in  the 
capacity  of  photographic  experimenter,  agreeing  to  devote  your  entire  time 
and  attention  to  perfecting  a  process  of  manufacturing  and  reproducing 
both  kinetoscopic  and  lantern  slide  pictures  in  natural  colors.  As 
compensation,  we  agree  to  pay  you  the. sura  of  $20.00  per  week  and  royalties 
on  the  goods  that  you  may  perfect,  as  follows: 

Kinetoscopic  films,  25  cents  per  each  50  feet. 

Colored  lantern  slides  perfected  by  you  we  agree  to  pay  you  a  royalty 
on  of  25  cents  per  one  dozen. 

This  arrangement  is  to  stand  for  a  period  of  six  weeks,  which 
we  understand  is  the  length  of  time  you  require  to  demonstrate  the  fact 
that  you  can  do  this  work  successfully. 

It  is  further  agreed  that  the  arrangements  may  be  terminated 
at  the  expiration  of  six  weeks,  at  which  time,  a  new 


and  definite  arrange- 


6/15,1900. 


Type  "Q"  Cel  I, 

CAPACITY  150  AMPERE  HOURS 

Mr.  Alex  Werner - #2. 

ment  can  be  made. 

Yours  very  truly,  , 

EDISON  MANUFACTURING  COMPANY 

JHW/JNN. 

GUufGX  . 


Howard  W.  Hayes,  Esq.,  '  *  '  ■ 

Prudential  Building,  .  - 

Newark,  N.  J. 

Dear  Sir: 

I  enclose  you  herewith  the  following  papers: 

. Contract,  dated  March  14th,  1899,  between  Thomas  A.  Edison  and 
Thomas  Crahan,  relative  to  the  taking  of  kine to graph  pictures,  etc., 
in  the  Klondike .  , 

letter,  dated  at  Seattle,  June  21st.,  1899,  addressed  to  myself, 
from  Thomas  Crahan,  Manager  of  the  Klondike  Exposition  Co. 

Copy  of  letter  dated  Jan.  16th,  1900,  from  Mr.  Edison  to  Mr. 

Crahan,  Manager  of  the  Klondike  Expo sitionCo. ,  and  Mr.  Crahan’ s 
acknowledgment  of  same  dated  Jan.  18th. 

We  have  made  arrangements  whereby  all  these  contracts,  letters, 
etc.,  are  to  be  cancelled  absolutely,  and  these  are  the  only  papers,  so 
far  as  X  know,  that  cover  the  situation,'  btit  in  any  event,  you  might 
make  the  release  absolute  to  cover  any  others. 

Mr.  Crahan  has  organized  this  Klondike  Exposition  Co.,  five-sixths 
of  which  stock  stands  in  his  name,  the  balance  being  distributed  apio.hgst 
his  friends.  However,  what  we  want  to-  do  is  to  get. a  full  release 


Type  "Q”  Cel 

CAPACITY  150  AMPERE  HOURS 

H.  W.  H.  (2)  6/15/1900. 

from  him  personally  and.  also  from  the  Company,  and  I  presume  that  the 
release  will  have  to  he  signed  hy  the  officers  of  the  Company.  Mr. 

Crahan  will  sign  the  paper  as  Vice. President  and  General  Manager  and 
have  it  attested  hy  the  Secretary.  However,  Mr.  Crahan  will  he  glad  to 
run  dovm  and  see  you  at  any  time  that  you  may  indicate,  bringing  with 
'him  the  hy-laws,  so  that  you  can  see  exactly  what  officials  should 
sign  this. 

The  consideration  for  the  releasing  of  these  contracts,  etc.,  is  the 
sum  of  $5,000 ,  $2,500  to  he  paid  in  cash  and  the  balance  in  goods  manu¬ 
factured  and  sold  hy  the  National  Phonograph  Co.,  the  Edison  Mfg.  Co.  and 
the  Bates  Mfg.  Co.,  said  goods  to  he  furnished  at  the  very  best  dis¬ 
counts  allowed  in  the  United  States. 

Will  you  kindly  draw  up  these  releases  in  duplicate,  sending  them 
to  me  at  the  earliest  possible  moment. 

If  you  desire  any  further  information,,  please  telephone  me,  and  if 
you  decide  that  you  would  like  to  see  Mr.  Crahan,  a  telephone  message 
or  letter  to  me  will  reach  him. 


Kindly  return  all  papers  enclosed 
Yours  very  truly, 


l  you  are  through  with  them. 


weg/iww 


Prudential  Building, 


Dear  Sir: 


Newark,  IT.  .T. 


X  return  you  herewith  the  form  of  contract  between  Thomas 
Crahan,  the  Klondike  Exposition  Co.  and  Mr.  Edison,  wiping  out  the 
present  arrangement,  all  of  which  appears  to  he  entirely  satisfactory 
to  both  Mr.  Edison  and  myself.  I  understand  that  a  meeting  of . the 
stockholders  has  been  called  to  approve  of  this  contract. 


Yours  very  truly, 


[ATTACHMENT] 


An  Indenture  made  his  eighteenth  day  of  Juno, 
hundred,  bn tween  Thomas  Crahan  of  oho  first  part,  the  Klondike 
Exposition  Company,  a  corporation,  of  Lho  3ooond  part  and  Vhoc- 
au  A, Edison  of  tho  third  part: 

Wi'EEEAS  on  tho  fourteenth  day  of  March,  A. P.  El Rh to on  hun¬ 
dred  and  Ninety-nine  an  agreement  was  ontored  into  botwoon  tho 
said  Thomas  A. Edison  and  tho  said  Thomas  0 rah an  in  regard,  to 
taking  by  photographlo  process  and  exhibiting  as  moving  pic¬ 
tures,  certain  places  and  saunas,  in  which  contract  it  is  pro¬ 
vided  '.hat  tho  said  Thomas  Craft  an  should  forthwith  cause  to  bo 
organized  undor  tho  laws  of  tho  State  of  Mow  Jersey,  a  corpor¬ 
ation  to  which  corporation  all  tho  rights  of  tho  said  Thomas 
Crahan  under  said  contract  should  bo  assigned;  a  copy  of  v/hich 
con  tract  is  h ore  to  annexed  marked  "Schedule  A. 11 

AND  WHEREAS  the  said  Thomas  Crahan  did  in  pursuance  of  tho 
provisions  of  said  oontraot  oauso  to  bo  organizod  undor  tho 
laws  of  tho  State  of  Mow  Jorsoy,  a  corporation  under  the  mono 


the  Klondike  Exposition  Company,  being  lho  said  party,  of  tho 
oocond  part  and  did  assign  o  the  said  party  of  the  second  , 
all  his  rights  undor  said  contract, 

AND  WHEREAS  by  a  contract  contained  in  two  lot  -ors,..  one  c 
letter  of  tho  said  ThomasA. Edison  to  tho  said  Thomas  Crahan, 
Manager  of  tho  said  Klondike  Exposition  Company,  dated  January 
sixteenth,  Nino  toon  hundred  and  the  other,  a.  lqt ter  from  tho 
3 aid  Thomas  Crahan,  Manager  as  aforesaid,  to  tho  said  Thomas 
A, Edison,  jiatqd ^January  eighteenth.  Nineteen  hundred,  ;,ha  S^ic 
first  mentioned  contract  was  by  mutual-  'consent -  materially  Hiiofr 
ifiod  and  changed;  oopios  of  which  letter s  oro  horoto  :  annexed 
marked  "Schedule  R"  and  "Sohodulo  0"  rosnoctfvoly. 


AND  WKEI1EAS  tho  ■  said  parti o; 


and  tho  said  party  of  i 


parties  <j>f  tho  first  and  second  part 
third  par's  have  mutually  agrood  to’ 


-1- 


[ATTACHMENT] 


abrogate  tho  s;;id  contracts  and  to  release  each  other  from  any 
claims  or  demands  of  or  from  each  other  on  account  thereof. 

HOW  THEREFORE  T.  IS  I "DEBTORS  V/ITMESMES  that  tho  said  par¬ 
ties  of  the  first  arid  second  part’,  inconsideration  of  the -sum 
of  Five  thousand  dollars,  to  be  paid  by  the  said  party  of  tho 
third  part  to  Ihe  party  of  the  sooond  part  in  the  manner  here¬ 
inafter  provided,  have  released  and  discharged,  and  by  those 
presonts  do  release  and  discharge  tho  said  party  of  the  third 
part,  his  heirs,  executors  and  administrators,  of  and  from  any 
and  all  Joint  or  several  claims  and  demands  at  law  or  in  ecu  it;' 
of  the  said  parties  of  the  first  and  second  parts,  arising  fro  -, 
or  on  account  of  Baid  contracts,  or  of  or  from  any  matter  or 
thing  arising  from  said  contracts,  as  fully  as  if  the  said  con¬ 
tracts  or  either  of  them  had  never  been  entered  into. 

Ann  it  is  fur  her  agreed  that  all  photographic  machines, 
projecting  machines,  and  films,  both  positives  end  negatives, 
made,  taken  or  furnlshod  under  ho  provisions  of  the  said  con¬ 
tracts,  or  either  of  thorn,  shall  bo  and  remain  tho  sole  proper¬ 
ty  of  tho  said  ThomasA, Edison;  and  that  any  such  machines,  or 
films  now  in  the  possession  of  the  said  parties  of  the  first 
ord  second  part..;,  shall  forthwith  bo  delivered,  to  tho  Baid 
Thomas  A. Edison. 

AUD  it  is  furthor  agreed  that  the  said  consideration  sum 
of  Five  thousand  dollars  shall  bo  paid  as  follows;  Two  thous¬ 
and  ~ivo  hundred  dollars  to  be  paid  by  ohe  said  Thomas  A. Edison 
to  the  said 1  Klondike  Exposition  Company,  in  cash  on  tho  sign¬ 
ing  of  this  instrument;  in  satisfaction  of  the  balance  of  Twc 
thousand  Five  hundred  dollars,  the  said  Thomas  A.EdlBonuahall 
oauso  to  be  delivered  to  tho  Klondike  Exposition  Company  on 
demand,  such  of  tho  goods  regularly  manufactured  or  sold  by 
tho  national  Phonograph  Company,  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Com¬ 
pany  or  then a  to  a  Manufacturing  Company,  as  the  said  Klondiko  • 
Exposition  Company  shall  by  Its  proper  officers  select,  to  thu 


[ATTACHMENT! 


aBKrofs&to  valuo  of  Two  thousand  Plvo  hundred  dollars.,  such  valr 
uo  to  ho  aBoertainod  by  computing  the  values  of  such  goods  so 
selecte'dat  the  lowest  prices  (including  discounts  for  the  lar¬ 
gest  quantities)  chat  the  said  goods  are  now  sold  anywhere  in 
tho  United  States  by  the  said  corporations  so  manufacturing  or 
selling  them. 

IN  WITNESS  WHEREOF,  the  said  parties  of  the  first  and  see} 
ond  part,  have  hereto  set  their  respective  hands  and  seals, 
and  the  said  party  of  bhp  second  part  has  caused  those  present! 
to  bo  signed  in  its  name  by  its  Vice-President  and  its  corpor¬ 
ate  seal  to  be  hereto  affixed  attested  to  by  its  Secretary,  in| 
duplicate,  the  day  and  year  first  above  written. 

Signed,  sealed  and  delivered  : 
in  tho  presence  of 
0 


■  ■ 


[ATTACHMENT! 


j  J 

S  0  II  E  D  U  h  E  A. 


THIS  AGREEMENT  mad®  at  ’.’test  Orange,,  Hoy/  Jersey  this  j 

jLurtoonth  day  of  March  in  the  yoar  One  thousand  eight  hundred  ; 

Lnd  ninety-nine  hetv/een  THOMAS  A,  EDISON,  on  the  one  part,  j 

Khorolnaf ter  dOBignated  as  Mr,  Edison),  and  THOMAS  GRAHAM,  / 

(hereinafter  designated  as  Mr;.  Crahan.)  ■  j 

WITNESSETH:  1 

|  V/IIEREAS  Mr.  Crahan  or  his  assigns  proposes  to  take  1 

and  obtain  pictures  and  representations  by  photographic  pro-  j 

cess  of  plaoes  and  scones  in  the  region  knov/n  as  the  Klondike 
country  and  elsewhere  in  Alaska,  in  the  North  West  Territory  .j 

of  Canada,  and  of  plaoes  and  scenes  elsewhere  from  and  to  ; 

Seattle  into  such  country,  all  of  which  is  hereinafter .dosig-  j 
nated  as  the  Territory,  and  intends  that  such  pictures  and  rep-  , 
rosontations  shall  be  fitted  and  prepared  for  first  class  ox-  I 
hibitlon  as  moving  pictures  by  the  process*’ and  manner  knovm  as 
the  projecting  Kinotescope  or  similar  apparatus,  and  intends 
bo  exhibit  the  same  particularly  at  the  Paris  Exposition  of  1 

1900  and  elsewhere  in  Prance,  and  in  England,  the  United  States  J 
Canada,  and  elsewhere;  Now  therefore  to  carry  out  such  propos-  J 

ition  and  intention  and.  In  consideration  of  mutual  promises  [ 

and  the  payment  of  the  moneys  hereinafter  provided  for,  it  Is 
agreed  as  follows: 

That  on  or  before  the  15th  day  of  May, 1999,  Mr,  Ed-  f 
Ison  shall  manufacture,  provide  and  furnish  two  complete  Kinet-  j 
ographs  or  photographic  apparatus  or  machines  of  the.  first 
class,  capable  of  taking  and  obtaining  such  pictures  or  the  j 

negatives  of  such  pictures  or  scenes  and  for  the  purpose  afore¬ 
said,  such  negatives  to  bo  of  at  least  throe  inches  in  Y/ldth 
inside  measurement.  The  photographlo  apparatus  or  machines 
shall  continue  and  remain  the  property  of.  Mr.  Edison,  but the 


[ATTACHMENT] 


exclusive  right  to  the  use  of  the  same  for  the  purpose  afore¬ 
said,,  or  of  any  substitute  of  such  machines,  shall  belong  to 
Mr.  Orphan  for  the  period  of  five  years  from  the  date  of  this 
contract.  As  compensation  to  Mr.  Edison  for  the  furnishing 
of  such  machines  and  their  use  as  aforesaid,  Mr.  Orahan  will 
pay  him  oho  oost,  said  cost  not  to  exceed  One  thousand  dollars 
for  both,  of  which  Two  hundred  dollars  shall  he  paid  upon  the 
execution  of  tills  contract,  the  receipt  of.  which  is  hereby  ac¬ 
knowledged,  and  Eight  hundred  dollars  on  July  1st,  1899  by 
bank  draft  on  Mew  York  City',  Mew  York,  if  Mr.  Edison  has  then 
faithfully  performed,  his  agreement  aB  to  suoh  machines. 

Together  v/lth  3uch  machine  or  machines  and  there¬ 
after  from  time  to  time  during  the  period  of  thiB  contract  as 
shall  be  required  by  Mr .  Orahan,  Mr.  Edison  shall  have  prepared 

and  furnished  proper  and  suitable  negative  films  for  use  in 
such  machines  and  for  the  taking  and  obtaining  of  such 
pictures..'-  :  as  aforesaid,  and  shall  thereafter  within  reason¬ 
able  time-  develop  or  cause  to  bo  developed  and  prepared  suoh 
negative  films  in  final  shape  ready  for  use  for  the  proper  mak¬ 
ing  of  positives  to  be  used  for  exhibition  in  the  manner  pro- 
■  posed  as  aforesaid;  and  for  such  negative,;  films  and  for  the 
final  preparation  of  the  same  Mr,  Orahan  will  pay  Mr.  Edison 
tho  actual  cost  of  such  films  together  v/lth  the  cost  of  their 
final  preparation  in  all  not  to  exceed  thirty  cents  per  running 
foot  of  suoh  films;  and  said  negatives  shall  be  paid  for  ono 
third  on  delivery  at  Mr,  Edison's  manufactory  at  V/est  Orange, 
Mow  Jersey;  one- third  on  July  lbth, 1899,  to  Mr.  Edison's  a- 
gent  at  Dawson,  Yukon  Territory  by  bank  draft  on  New  York  City, 
New  York,  and  one-third  on  complete  development  of  tho  same 
ready  for  manufacture  of  positives  therefrom;  and  also  to' 
furnish  Buoh  positives  from  the  negatl  ve  films  as . may  be  re-;.  . 
quired. upon  the  written  order  of  Mr.  Orahan  but  not  otherwise 
at  a  price  not  to  exceed  thirty  oents  per  running  foot  of  said 
films;  the  said  positive  films  shall  be  paid  for  as  ordered  by 

-b- 


[ATTACHMENT! 


Mr.  Oral: an  ready  for  use  in  such  projecting  machines.  All  I 

said  films  both  negative  and  positive  shall  ho  the  property  of  j 

i 

Mr.  Crahan.  ;! 

At  the  time  said  pho  to  (-rap  hie  apparatus,  or  machines  are  \ 
furnished  as  aforesaid  Mr.  Edison  shall  select  and  appoint  a 
proper  person  of  duo  experience  and  shall  thereafter  suhsti—  j 
•cute  any  other  or  others  in  his  plaoo  from  time  to  time  as  may  1 

he  required,  who  during  the  season  of  18  9  W ,  or  so  much  thereof  1 

as  Mr.  Crahan  shall  doom  necessary  to  obtain  pictures  in  said 
Territory,  shall  have  charge  of  said  photographic  apparatus 
and  machines;  and  under  the  direction  and.  control  of  tir.Crahar 
shall  take  snd  obtain  all  su oh  pictures  and  scones  within  the 
territory  above  mentioned;  that  Mr.  Crahan  will  pay  such  per¬ 
son  or  his  substitute  during  such  employment  at  the  rate  of 
i>Lve  ('$3,00)  dollars  per  day  and  in  addition  thereto  his  neo-  ^ 

easany  and  proper  expenses,  such  payment  to  be  made  as  Mr.  j 

Edison  shall  from  time  to  time  require.  . 

On  or  before  the  first  day  of  January  1900,  Mr. Edison  j 

will  manufacture,  furnish  and  deliver  a  proper  Klnetosoope  or  j 
projection  maohlne  ,  snd  on  .three  months  notice  others,  all  of  j 

the  first  class  suitable  and  fitted  for  the  projection  and  j 

showing  of  such  pictures  and  scones  in  exhibition  and  which 
shall  project  or  show  suoh  pictures  at  the  best  focu3.  at  a  size  | 

in  projection  of  not  less  than  eighteen  feet  by  twenty  foot.  j 

Such  projecting  machines  shall  be  the  exclusive  property  of 
Mr.  Crahan  for  which  he  shall  pay  to  Mr.  Edison  upon  delivery 
the  oost  thereof  not  to  exceed  Two  hundred  dollars  per  machine, 

If  by  accident  or  misadventure  hot  due  to  the  fault  or 
negligence  of  Mr.  Crahan  either  or -any  of  such  Kinotograph  ma¬ 
chines  shall  within  the  said  period  be  lost  or  destroyed,  or 
so  injured  as  to  become  useless  for  the  purposes  aforesaid,  or 
shall  bo  or  become  ineffective  for  first  class'  work  in  the  par-  -'. 


-(J- 


[ATTACHMENT! 


jticulars  aforesaid,  then  and  in  that  case  Mr.  Edison  will,  with 
ill  reasonable  apood,  repair,  or -cause  to  he  repaired,  such 
nachine  or  maohinos  to  he  put  in  first  class  shape  and  effec¬ 
tiveness  without  cost  to  Mr.  Crahanj  or  in  case  said  machine 
ar  machines  cannot  be  so  ropaired  Mr.  Edison  will  without  cost 
furnish  and  substitute  another  or  other  raachihes  in  place  . 
thereof)  the  intention  of  the  parties  being;  that  at  all  times 
■  during  the  above  mentioned  period  Mr.  Edison  will  bo  obligated, 
except  by  default  or  negligence  of  Mr.  Crehan,  to  furnish  and 
ho  op  in  order  and,  effectiveness  such  machines  or 'furnish  proper 
substitutes  therefor. 

It  is  further  agre  d  that  except  as  hereinafter  provided 
neither  Mr.  Edison  nor  any  of  the  Oompani.es  with  whioh  he  is 
connected,  nor  any  employee  of  his  or  them,  shall-  knowingly 
make  or  furnish  any  similar  photographic  apparatus  for  similar 
use  and  purposes  in  the  above  mentioned  territory  or  for  ropro- . 
sontlng  or  showing  scenes  in  such  territory. 

And  as  further  consideration  going  to  this  entire  con¬ 
tract  it  is  agroed  that  Mr.  Edison  shall  reooivo  and  bo  en¬ 
titled  to  SO  per  cent  of  the  net  receipts  do  lived  from  the 
exhibition  of  such  pictures  or  scenes. 

During  the  said  undertaking  and  the  talcing  and  obtaining 
such  pictures  Mr  Edison  shall  be  entitled,  within  Bald  terri¬ 
tory  by  apparatus  and  appliances  and  films  provided  at  his  own 
cost,  and  by  and  thorough  the  person  or  persons  so  selected  as 
aforesaid,  to  take  and  obtain  all  sUch  pictures  and  scones; as 
he-  shall  see  fit  for  use  in  Kinetesoopes  of  the  kind  and  size' 
heretofore  used  by  Mr.  Edison  in  slot  machines  and  otherwise 
in  projections.  That  the  negatives  and  positives  of  pictures 
and  soenes  so  taken  shall  belong  to  Mr,  Edison  and  under  his 
direction  and  control  may  bo  exhibited  in  tho  United  States 
and  in  Europe  in  slot  machines  or  otherwise;  that  the  net 
receipts  of  suoh  exhibiting  shall  be  equally  divided  between 


[ATTACHMENT] 


Mr.,  Edison  and.  Mr.  C  rail  an.  It  is  however  understood  that 

such  pictures  shall  not  he  exhibited  at  any  time  or  In  any 
place  until  the  exhibition  of  the  pictures  first  above  men¬ 
tioned  has  begun  in  Paris. 

All  provisions  of  this  contract  shall  he  and  become  for 
the  benefit  aB  well  of  the  parties  hereto  as  for  their  respec¬ 
tive  exeoutor Sj  administrators  and  assigns,  and  that  Mr.  Grahar 
may  assign  his  contraot  and  all  his  rights  thereunder  and. 
that  his  assignee  or  assignees  shall  lie  entitled  to  all  the 
rights  and  privileges  herein  given  and  be  obligated  by  all  his 
obligations. 

Mr.  Grahan  agrees  that  ho  will  at  once  organize  a  cor¬ 
poration  under  the  laws  of  Mew  Jersey,  to  which  this  contract 
shall  be  assigned*  which  corporation  shall  stand  in  the  place 
of  Mr,  Or chan  as  to  all  rights  and  obligations  of  this  con¬ 
tract. 

'•II?  WITNESS  WHEREOF  the  parties  have  hereunto  set  their 
hands  this  fourteenth  day  of  Mar oh  1000  in  duplicate. 

In  Presence  Of 

GEORGE  K.  ADAMS  THOMAS  A..  EDISON. 

THOMAS  GRAHAM, 


-8- 


[ATTACHMENT! 


SCHEDULE  Tj. 


Orange,  .'f.J.,  Jan,lU,19oo.  j 

Thomas  Crahan,  Esq.,  Manager,  / 

Klondike  Exposition  Co.,  ,  I 

Cambridgeport,  Mass.  i 

Dear  Sir:-  | 

Confirming  our  conversation,  I  dosiro  to  make  the  j 
following  proposition,  based  upon  your  statement  that  the 
Klondike  Exposition  Company  has  expended  to  date  Seventy- three  j 

Hundred  and  Eighty-five  Dollars  ($7303)  in  procuring  films  of 
different  scenos  in  the  Klondike  country:  ] 

1st.  That  I  will  furnish  projecting  machines  and  positive 
films  from  the  negatives  that  have  been  furnished  by  you  up  to  j 

an  amount,  for  such  machines  and  positive  films,  of  Seventy-  f 

throe  Hundred  and  Eighty- five  Dollars  ($7385) ,  such  films  being  j 
estimated  at  tv/onty  cents  (SO/)  per  lineal  foot,  and  the  ma-  •  j 
chines  to  be  furnished  at  a  price  not  to  exceed  Two  hundred 
Dollars  ($200.)  each. 

2nd.  The  machines  and  positive  films  to  remain  iry  property 
and  be  under  my  control,  subject  to  their  use  for  exhibiting 
as  now  contemplated. 

3rd.  That  the  net  receipts  from  exhibiting  such  machinery  T~ 
and  positive  films  shall  ‘  be  equally  divided-  between  the  Klon¬ 
dike  Exposition  Co.  and  myself. 

4th.  You  torocslve  a  salary  of  Sixty  dollars  ($00)  per  | 
week  ana  expenses,  same  to  be  deducted  before  any  net  profits  j 
are  disbursed.  ,  j 

5th.  In  case  any  extra  films  are  to  bo  supplied  to  keep, 
eaoh  outfit  complete,  such  films  are  to  be  paid  for  in  cash 
at  a  rate  not  to  exceed  (20/)  twenty  cents  per  lineal  foot. 


[ATTACHMENT] 


the  amount,  of  samo  to  too  deducted  'before  any  net  profits  are 
disbursed. 

This  arrangement  can  be  abrogated  by  either  you  or  myself 
upon  giving  six  months  n  written  notice,  but  so  long  as  this 
understanding  shall  stand  it  shall  be  a  substitute  for  the  con¬ 
tract  dated  tho  14-th  day  of  March,  1B0G,  and  not  otherwise'. 

Ycurs  very  truly, 

■Thomas  A.  Edison. 


-10- 


[ATTACHMENT] 


SCHEDULED. 

New  York,  January  18th, 1900. 


|.ir.  Thomas  A. Edison, 

Orange,  N.J, 

Daar  Sir:- 

In  reply  to  your  latter  of  January  10th  I  has  to  -  say 
that  the  proposition  Is  accepted. 

I  Yours  vary  truly, 

Thomas  Crahan 

Manager  Klondike  Exposition  Co. 


ASSIGNMENT. 


WHEREAS,  I,  THOMAS  CRAHAN,  of  Orange,  in  the  County 
of  Essex  and  State  of  New  Jersey,  did  obtain  copyright  for  <L 
hook,  the  title  or  description  of  which, is  in  the  following 
words,  to  wit:  "Artistio  Glimpses  of  the  Wonder  World",  which 
copyright  is  numbered  13128,  and  bears  dat6  the  twenty-fifth  a 
of  May,  in  the  year  Nineteen  hundred;  and  whereas,  I, am  now 
the  sole  owner  of  said  copyright  and  all  rights  under  the 
same;  and  whereas,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  of  Orange,  in  the  County 
of  Essex  and  State  of  New  Jersey,  is  desirous  of  acquiring  the 
entire  interest  in  the  same. 

NOW',’  THEREFORE,  to  all  whom  it  may  oonoern,  be  it 
known  that  for  andin  consideration  of  the  sum  of  One  Dollar, 
($1.00)  and  other  valuable  considerations  to  me  in  hand  paid, 
the  receipt  of  which  is  hereby  acknowledged,  I,  the  said  THOMA 
ORAHAN,  have  . Bold,  assigned  and  transferred,  and  by  these  pres 
ents  do  sell,  assign  and  transfer  unto  the  said  THOMAS  A. EDI¬ 
SON,  the  whole  right,  title  and  interest  in  and  to  the  said 
copyright;  the  same  to  be  held  and  enjoyed  by  the  said  THOMAS 
A.  EDISON  for  his  own  use  and  behoof,  and  for  the  use  and  be¬ 
hoof  of  his  legal  representatives  to  the  full  end  of  the  term 


for  which  said ' copyright  is  granted,  as  fully  and  entirely  i 
the  same  would  have  been  held  and  enjoyed  by  me  had  this  as¬ 
signment  and  sale  not  been  made. 

IN  TESTIMONY  WHEREOF,  I  have  hereunto  set  my  hand  and] 
affixed  ny  seal  at  •  *-/  ffa  County  of 

i^u^L  and  State  of  this 

Nineteen  hundred. 


day  of 


In  the  presence  of 


[ATTACHMENT! 


I  goo.  No,  I3JAL 1_ 

%ihXKXV(  0f  ©tfUgX.eSS,  t0  wit: 


Be  it  vemembereb, 

<&iat  071  _ day  o/_ _ 01<2U - t?O0. 


U  -/ 

Book,  tie  title  oh  deselection  of  wiici  is  e 

in  tie  Coiotuiny  refolds,  to  wit: 

"  *  """  ' 

tie  uy/d  eviclcoji  4e  claims  as  aettiou  in  conjolmily  eoiti  tie  duos  of  tie  fyinilcd  dilates 
lesfeectiny  (d>c/iyliy4ts. 


(Office  of  ilic  glcgistce  erf  ®opa»iflftts 
‘Jgttastiiixgtcru,  §.  ®. 


(iCttdL^rh 


Register  of  Copyrights. 


A  regular  meeting  of  the  Stockholders  of  the  Klondike 
Exposition  Company  held  this  eleventh  day  of  July  1900,  at  its 

?  •" ' 06  ^  thS  Edla0n  labol'atorJr>  corner  of  Valley  Road 

a^K£gfcH»*i  Aventte,  West  Orange,  ft.  j. 


The  meeting  Was  called  to  order,  and  Thomas  A.  Edison 
;was  chosen  Chairman,  and  Thomas  crahan,,  Secretary. 

On  motion  the  meeting  adjourned,  until  Monday  the  16th 
day  of  July,  1900,  at  S  o’clock  3? ,  H.  at  the  same  place. 


Secretary, 


r^r  *  A  special  meeting  of  the  stockholders  of  the  Klondike 

Exposition  Company  duly  called  pursuant  to  notice,  and  an  adjourned 
regular  meeting  of  the  stockholders  of  the  Klondike  Exposition 
Company,  held  this  sixteenth  day  of^July,  1900,  at  the  jjdiaon 

laboratory,  corner  Valley  Road  amrS®i3sQ*£i  Avenue,  West  Orange, 

A. 

H.  J. 

The  meeting  was  called  to  order  trad^Thomas  Crahan,  Vice 
President,  on  account  of  the  death  .Of  Mr.  Qeorge  H.  Adams,  the 
President. 


Mr.  Crahan  reported  to  the  meeting  that  he  had  arranged 
a  settlement  with  lir.  Edison  of  the  matter  in  dispute  between 
Mr.  Edison  and  the  company,  and  had  executed  in  behalf  of  the 


Company,  an  agreement  as  follows: 


Moved  and  seconded  that  the  meeting  approve,.  of  such 
settlement. 

Motion  carried. 

Mr.  Crahan  then  presented  the  followig  g  bill  for  moneys 
emended  by  him  on  behalf  of  the  Company. 

{Copy  bill) 

Moved  and  seconded  that  the  company  sell  to  Mr.  Crahan 
the  goods  and  merchandise  transferred  to  the  Company  by  Mr.  Edison 
at  the  co3t  price  thereof  to  the  Oonroany,  and  pay  to  him  the  oaslC 
received  on  such  settlement,  and  that  such  amount  and  goods  etc 
be  credited  on  hl3  said  bill,  -which  bill  shall  be  appryed.by  the 

'N 

meeting. 

Motion  carried. 

Mr. i  Wllliam^o.  Oammann  then  tendered  his  resignation 
CiMlldtn'  ■ 

as  Secretary^ of  the  Company  to  take  effect  on  the  adjournment  of 
this  meeting,  which  resignation  w  accepted. 

On  motion  the  meeting  then  adjourned. 


Secretary. 


TERRY  HINKLE. 


M*on  j 

TELEPHONE  3247  18th  ST, 


jfron 

Wor^  °ft  ffinds  flop  ^ iziidings , 

51S  &  520  WEST  22nd  STREET, 


_0ct,-23., -19Q0,- 


The  Edison  Mfg.  Co, 

Orange,  N.  J. 

Mr.  Win.  Simpkin,  Engr., 

Dear  Sir:-  ■ 

We  enclose  herewith  a  print  of  the  drawing  which  you  saw 
.  and  approved  at  our  office  several  days  ago. 

This  shows  the  flat  construction  for  roof  of  the  Photograph¬ 
ic  Studio  at  41  E.  21st  St. 

We  submitted  this  modification  to  the  Bldg.  Dept.,  and  were 
informed  today  that  it  had  been  passed  satisfactory,  and  you  will  no 
doubt  receive  written  notice  of  their  approval  of  this  amendment,  as 
we  filed  the  amended  drawing  in  your  name. 

We  will  begin  delivering  for ick  to  the  job  tomorrow,  and  ex¬ 
pect  to  begin  laying  the  sid^^^i^b^it;. Friday  or  Saturday  of  this 


1 


Yours  very  truly, 


The  Hinkle  Iroh  Co., 


week. 


BANNING  &  BANNING, 
COUNSELORS  AT  LAW,. 

204  Dearborn  Stri 


CHICAGO. 


THIS  AGHEEMEHT  made  this  day  ot  December,  1900, 

between  The  Seli^  Polyscope  Company,  of  Chicago,  Illinois,  of  the 
first  part,  and. Ephraim  Banning  and  Thomas  A.  Banning,  composing 
the  law  firm  of  Banning  &  Banning,  of  the  same  place,  of  the  second 
part,  WITNESSETH: 

WKEBEAS,  two  suits  have  been  recently  begun  by  Thomas  A. 
Edison  against  William  N.  Selig,  predecessor  and  president  of  the 
party  of  the  first  part,  in  the  Circuit  Court  of  the  United  States 
for  the  Northern  District  of  Illinois,  for  infringements  of  letters 
patent  of  the  United  States,  one  charging  infringement  of  patent 
No.  493,426,  issued  to  the  complainant  March  14,  1893,  for  an  Im¬ 
provement  in  Apparatus  for  Exhibiting  Photographs  of;-  Moving  Objects, 
and  the  other  charging. infringement  of  letters  patent  No.  589,168, 
issued  to  the  complainant  August  31,  1897,  for  an  Improvement  in 
Kinematographic  Cameras,  and  a  decision  in^ the  complainant's  favor 
in  said  suits  may  result  in  a  perpetual  injunction  closing  the 
business  of  the  party  of  the  first  part  and  causing  it  to  lose  its 
entire  investment  therein;  and 

WHEREAS,  the  party  of  the  first  part  is  desirous  of  se¬ 
curing  the  services  of  the  party  of  the  second  part  to  defend  said 
suits  and  any  others  which  may  be  hereafter  begun  against  it  or  any 
of  its  customers,  and  generally  to  look  after  and  take  care  of  its 
legal  business  relating  to  patents,  during  the  period  hereinafter 
mentioned,  and  it  is  estimated  that  Five  Hundred  Dollars  ($500.) 
will  be  reasonable  condensation  for  their' services  heretofore  rendered 
in  the  organization  of  the  party>.of  the  first  part  and  other  matters, 
and  that  Six  Thousand  Dollars  ($6000.)  a  year  for  the  next  two  years 
will  be  reasonable  compensation  for  their  services  in  defending  said 
suits  and  in  the  other  business  above  referred  to;  and 


WHEREAS,  Will .1am  IT.  Selig,  President  of  the  party  of  the 
first  part,  is  desirous  that  the  services  of  the  party  of  the  second 
part  shall  be  secured  to  defend  said  suits  and  conduct' other  business 
as  aforesaid  and  to  that  end  consents  that  one  hundred  and  twenty- 
five  (125)  shares  of  the  stock  subscribed  for  by  him  and  paid  for 
by  the  transfer  of  his  business  to  the  company  may  be  issued  to  the 
party  of  the  second  part  in  compensation  for  their  services  as 
aforesaid: 


1TOW,  THEREFORE,  in  consideration  of  the  premises  and  of 
the  mutual  promises  and  undertakings  hereinafter,  mentioned,  said 
parties  have  agreed  and  hereby  agree  between  themselves  as  follows: 

1*  In  consideration  of  the  issuance  to  them  of  one 
hundred  and  twenty-five  (125)  shares  of  the  capital  stock  of  the 
party  of  the  first  part,  fully  paid  and  non-ass essable,  as  herein¬ 
after  provided,  the  party  of  the  second  part  hereby  receipt  for  and 
release  all  their  claims  for  services  heretofore  rendered  in  the 
organization  of  the  party  of  the  first  part  and  otherwise,  and  agree 
to  take  charge  of  the  defense  of  said  two  suits  above  referred  to, 
and  any  and  all  other  suits  which  may  be  hereafter  begun  against 


the  party  of  the  first  part, 


any  of  its  customers  for  infringe- 


a“>  «"  look  after  and  take  oka™ 

or  and  o.nduot  its  1*1  business  r.l.tins  to  patents,  rot-  dur- 

*”S  “8  ‘'*~I”aer  °r  “•  .-a  for  t»o  yeans  thereafter  . 

mtl1  1903  -  *«’»>«  further  payment  or  com- 

pensation  therefor;  provided  that  the  party  of  the  first  part  is  to 


pay  all 
duct  of 
part  in 


expenses  connected  with  the  defense  of 
other  business,  and  co-operate  with  the 


said  suits  and  con- 
party  of  the  second 


securing  testimony  and  in  such  other 


work  and  ways  as 


may  be 


found  necessary;  and  provided  further  that  if  said  125  shares  of 
stock  have  not  been  otherwise  fully  paid  for,  this  agreement  shall 
be  accepted  as  full  payment  therefor  by  the  party  of  the  first  part. 

2.  In  consideration  of  this  agreement,  relieving  it 
from  the  burden  of  paying  counsel's  fees  for  the  defense  of  said 
suits  and  conduct  of  said  business,  the  party  of  the  first  part 
hereby  consents  to  and  approves  the  foregoing,  and  agrees  to  cause 
125  shares  of  its  capital  stock,  fully. paid  and  non- asses sable,  to  be 
issued  to  the  party  of  the  second  part  or  their  order,  in  such  way 
as  they  may  desire,  (which  is  done  simultaneously  herewith,  and  the 
receipt  of  which  stock  is  hereby  acknowledged  by  the  party  of  the 
second  part);  and  in  case  such  stock  has  not  been  fully  paid  for 
otherwise  the  party  of  the  first  part  hereby  accepts  this  agreement 
and  the  services  to  be  rendered  as  aforesaid  in  full  payment  there¬ 
for  and  for  all  claims  on  account  thereof. 

I1T  WITNESS  WHEBEOE  the  party  of  the  first  part  has  caused 
these  presents  to  be  signed  by  its  president,  and  its  corporate  seal 
to  be  hereto  affixed,  and  the  party  of  the  second  part  have  hereunto 
set  their  hands  and  seals  the  day  and  year  first  above  written. 


Attest. 


To  The  Sell  g  Polyscope  Company: 

In  consideration  of  your  assuming  the  defense  of  the 
suits  above  referred  to,  and  ofmy  being  relieved  from  the' burden 
thereof,  I  hereby  authorize  and  request  you  to  issue  to  Messrs. 
Banning  &  Banning,  or  such  persons  as  they  may  designate,  125  shares 
of  stock,  fully  paid  and  non-ass essable  out  of  the  stock  subscribed 
for  by  me  and  paid  for  by  the  transfer  of  my  business  and  matters 
relating  thereto. 


Chicago,  Decembe 


/gf#i! 


[ATTACHMENT] 


Wt)t  gdtg  ^olpocope  Co 


?/di_  £i.Cy?  —  -  - - - 

&-*>?£.  f?Z  j^-ao(_ -  " 


(2>^~aL^y; 

/^p-<_-  "7 £Z-c~^£ 
/<  17  < 


7^  zs-zr-£^"'  /^'£t--\_AZ?'^2_ 

— ' —  <s* — 

JAU£z 


My^ef  /Zz^c^  /~™s  - 
^^r-7-  ^  ^ 

J^OjL^y^p.  yy <x~~  ~  ~  -$r,rv^s  ~ 


G^  9^~.  _ 

y_fl^*s-e-yp  /^o^-a~e>ye.  ^ <s' 


[ATTACHMENT] 


II  S»eltg  spolpcojit  Co 


NO.  43  PECK  COURT  tyh  ^3 

CHICAGO.  ILL. 

_ -  - _ 

9-—Z  -  -  - - - 

a  ■  •  (^CX^CyJ)  - 

7^  -  -i-_  -  - 


_  ^rz' 

-  4~0  ', 


>-f« 
/  6~0  < 


(c^^J  - 

_  r^JZZ;  j.s  +• 

~Z~^y  y<U^x£  A=^u_  <rr-^v"  ^  ^ 

7bZZ^l  ^ - — - .7^' 

•f.  a.K.rH~~*  &~*** 

/3 ^=s.9a-^-  - 

r2--— <_  /j?^Z£-€  —  -tf*^*/-  -  - 

*^y£-  9 

^JL_  _^LT  *  -W 

Z^^=L,  r&r  c~^~—  777 - 

ZZZp)  -  - 


_ _ _  _ /^  - 

_  $-0  ; 


[ATTACHMENT] 


Wt>t  gdtg  $olpocope  Co 


CHICAGO,  ILL.  X  ^  Oy. 

9fu^O,  9-^  ru_  - ‘”A  *? 

£  7.  <=•  — .  A'  ~  -  ^  *' 

^ — 7  ^—7  <^/r?  _  ^  - 

ru^s^  /f.  - ^  ■• 

j  7  ^  /£  -  - _ ^ 

|  - *"»  • 

|  ^=^77*.  ^  «.  PcU/Py  YtLlp^C  £  «>-v</  —  ■ 

1  - 

7i.sk - <at&K_'M~—% yi  Y2^y^^,  Ay  - - i_I' ' 

j  _ _*_ 

!  - _ /  A~~D 

_ _ /  lj 

I  O^y^CiA  fi-^-ir-A'  - - —  -r~c/ 

7^wv7_ — £-A^  fir  A o^M~S£yLf_  £  r?'0^  ~  "  ~'^i|, 

- £ —  "7^e_  =77— e_<>__  Qh^  AAAsj^ _*'  •- 

,/c-v^  7 -j^o  <  ^  ^  e^. —  —  -  —  "P^T7,' 

^  -7-7  -  -  -  -  ^ 


[ATTACHMENT! 


Wtit  Hritg;  |)oIgscoj)c  Co 


OTtt  £, 


Advertising  and  Special  Sir., 


fa**,  frn 


- 


:.  Ut 


^  6Z— 


s - — - 

-  p* — ^ 


i1- 


/K-U,  j-w  - - 

^Cv-A-^o  i  ^  "* 

&£ e.KVrJ 

f  fyr^CZ  <5^£tk<-e  1^7 ^ 

'/be-*’ — e*^  /3l-5(*#~'  I'lA-O^t^  _  — 

SS7  s)^,  n 

fd  f  Xa_  a72l-t_  ^--t- — “■' 


3"»  ' 
.  _  -  3-0  • 

_  _  ^  -s~  '■ 
_  -S-Q  , 


—  l^JP*- 


^  -  -  - 


f3<rz^.  XQcLS&t^  (pp^-iJ  -pc 


_  S'-O' 

-  -  iTU 


J~-zJ 
7  A'"~2> 


JL - 


[ATTACHMENT] 


9?*  fi 


The  Polyscope,  Songs  Illustrated 

Advertising  and  Special  Size 

Films  to  Order 


>jr 

1~  CyY\yd>. —  -^-  /-i,e ^-r-&C  - 

/"? — .  -v-t-v-o  ^4-*-  ^ 

..  cldU^C  SJ  f  - 

— e.  ir^~c,C'  "  ~  ~ 

[jdiZ-  — x— o  — x/-<^(  — 

/9  .  ,  0/-le~o 

/d*L^~-^  __i  - TiaZc^C  irr~  ^  ~  ~ 


s>~» 
J~a 
z>~o 


-2  V“ 

.2.  ^-t) 
i~TS 


sr~\ o 


- ^  01 — *- 

^  — «-«-~o  <=J"t/— »T  ®(  ~ 


//  7^fl 


[ATTACHMENT] 


[ATTACHMENT] 


Wf)t  ikltg  ftolggcope  Co 


NO.  43  PECK  COURT 
*  ^®H,CAGO*  1 


Films,  Transparencies 

The  Polyscope,  Songs  Illustrated 

Advertising  and  Special  Size 

Films  to  Order 

O 

/!/*-<>- 
-  -  - - /3..ST 


z 

- 

- 

/^^-c  r2-Je_<.  f2L*^£~  (j.  /?.  ¥>  £  j 

fcx-y/u-  _  - - - 

h^n^/.  ^  n^c,  t2— - 

- -- 

f^£yn w  7 (g^c^)  - 

XOcu^  (S~~^yi 

%  Pon^jioKs  ■  /3? <^a-^- 


7-^y/C^cJ^ - (£?C>) ^  s~ 

~£—r  y/_  £-- - -  —  -  -  -  ^  ^ 


[ATTACHMENT] 


=>  s^'43' 

_ ^<^~2) 


- -**■ — a  pG^-a-tsC^  ' 

f^JL-e/{  (/~)  - a--^_!_  ^-tnr-f*^  —  - - 

«/J  P^rz^-  <b-& — P  Zx. « — 1_  ^ JAty^hf' — -w  & 

oLQjlo  C}yio-z - t-p  "?—<■ - -  XP-y^C/.  ’y~-Tf~e( - 

pA  cr\  -.  _~  L*Ia^P — ._  //‘^5 

-  -  - 

C7^~tsx — t^N^o  ^Ttr~zr  e=’^  " — ■ 

r  /-  ~  ~  “  "  ' 


,  r^  ?d 

_  _  -Tc'-o 


[ATTACHMENT] 


Wife  §k(tg;  ^olpscope  Co 


CHICAC 

r<  o/JUZe^r 


Films,  Transparencies  '  ' 

The  Polyscope,  Songs  Illustrated 
_  I  Advertising  end  Special  Six, 

97*//  ■  a» UL 


/9>> 

-  -  ■  3^ 


_ _____ _ 

A;/rr^  -  - ■  '^w- 


-  4* 


_ 

Ch^c~3^z^=.  - _ 

|  "'  (^Sn^ - -p-rs^T-  -  — - 

;  6  97-n^L  ~l<*- _  -  -  —  -  ‘  ~ 

|  — : - - 

&  X&C^  _y*  ~pA-~/.  —  — 

—/!  7~£.  —■  ^  —  — 

^ o  e/1  3 1/3^/  /—  ///./2- — £. 

7z/L  TCJ^c  -~l  ir~~~‘p'  -  ••  _  - 

^  - 

-7-^. - 

t,  AA^-<~  _ =_  j  __  _  _  _  — 

- 

7-^ — .  -  -  —  — 


/  s-* 

_ ■i'*- ee  ii 

■fr& 
JZ.  &—£> 

/  ^  2) 
5— a 
/<='—£> 

-  4~» 

_  J—O 
_/  S-tD 


'  -£  3- 


/'  s~ a 

<£■  O' 

±—o 


t>t~0 


[ATTACHMENT] 


fcli/w-e  b  v  ci  tm 

kJ,  wise-  - 

^  ^r^'1  x 

JW  1^-  “****• Mr*‘  , 

■  I,  /  l,Lc.  jc^cc-^ 

*  L^c,.u  p  ^ 

k  lt;  tz ^ 

!‘Tt  ,  „,#=•« 

er^n  J  .,  ,.,„^ 


^Tpr**: 


p;:  ifc; 

1/  1 1--  (^/U’/  _  | 
£  q.al^  ista-v-'f"  | 


Cu^A-' 


1900.  Patents  (D-00-16) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to 
foreign  and  domestic  patent  applications,  patent  litigation,  and  other  patent 
matters.  Most  of  the  material  consists  of  letters  to  Edison  from  the  law  firm  of 
Dyer,  Edmonds  &  Dyer  pertaining  to  phonograph  patents  and  patent 
infringements. 

■  Less  than  10  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  The 
following  items  have  not  been  selected:  non-substantive  correspondence  about 
application  fees  or  patent  renewals,  letters  of  transmittal,  statements  of  claims 
allowed,  and  documents  that  duplicate  information  in  selected  items. 


tfi>tcAan€J\C/)i/s>-. 
Samue/i G£Wmo*u/s. 
/y-ailAZ.Dytr. 


y^ieceit/^.'d^r./wi/iySO  QauJ& 

.  3/  J^aMau'^hcciC. 

<2z»* 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 

Orange,  N.J. 


'Y'mmKJrwZriG 

M..AZ.SSWOrl; 


January  22,  1900. 


We  beg  to  enclose  the  application  papers  for 


divisional  application  c ft  your  application  filed  March  17, 
1899,  Serial  No.  709,44^  (Edison  No. 1002).  The  Examiner  has 
allowed  the  claim  on  tjhe  process  in  the o original  case  and  all 
of, the  claims  which  4  have  made  in  the  enclosed  papers  except 
the  first,  which  we  ijope  to  secure.  The  drawings , in  the  di- 
i  same  as  those  for  the  original.  Please 
papers  as  we  have  indicated. 

Yours  very  truly. 


visional  case 
execute  the  enclosi 


(P.L.D.) 

Enclosures. 


<&&j07&uJ4U.  '^mU 

*  3/J&JJ"t«$(hve?.  MJ&SWGrt 

i  February  21,  1900. 


Thomas  A.  Edison, 
Orange,  \ 


In  reference\to  your /applications  Edison  No.  1017  and 
No.  1024  for  Prbcess/and  Apparatus  for  Drying  and  Screen¬ 


ing  Ores  and  Other  Materia 


,  consisting  in  crushing  the  material, 


passing  it  through  a  dr/er\  screening  it,  carrying  off  the  screen¬ 
ings,  recrushing  the  tailings-  and  mixing  such  recrushed  tailings 
with  fresh  quantitie/ of  wet  oXdarap  material,  the  Examiner  cites 


two  patents  granted/  t 


ter  of  Cleveland,  Ohio. 


of  these  patents  relate  principally*. to  methods  and  apparatus  for 


treating  garbage/  and  v 


»  thatVby  argument  submitted  to- 


»  have  ful/ly  distinguished  your  invention  therefrom.  It 


occurs  to  us, /however,  that  you  may  be  i 


>  to  swear  back  of  the 


references  in  case  the  Examiner  still  relies,  upon  them.  The 
Cummer  patents  were  both  applied  for  on  March^Sth  1898.  ;  Did 
you  make  your  invention  before  that  time?  \ 

Yours  very  truly,  n. 


un.  •* £(ur 


(E.L.D.) 


THE  NEW  JERSEY  ZINC  COMPANY, 

71  BROADWAY. 

- -  South  Mifce  Hill,  Franklin  Furnace,  n.  ,, 

W.-s. Mallory,  vice  Pres'i., 

N.J.  &  Pa.  Concentrating  Work?, 

,  Orange,  31. J, 


liar.  8, 1900 r 

MAR  9' 1900 


Dear  Sir:- 

Ref erring  to  your  letter  of  Mar.  7th  would  say  that  the 
3  ft.  Dryer  in  our  old  mill  does  not  at  any  place  arrange  for  the  overs 
on  the  screen  to  be  returned  to. the  Dryer  after  once  passing  through. 
This  is  the  arrangement  in  our  new  Crushing  House, Mill  No.  2. 

We  hope  to  get  off  the  shipment  of  Fraiiklinite  with 
Almandito  mixture  to  you  today.  Cause  of;delay  in  shipping,  wo  had  to 
mine  the  ore  in  order  to  get  the  mixture  which  you  desire. 


Yours  very  Truly, 


THE  NEW  JERSEY  ZINC  COMPANY, 


THE  NEW  JERSEY  ZINC  COMPANY, 


71  BROADWAY.  -  ‘ 

-  South  Mine  Hill,  Franklin  Furnace,  N.  J. 

WIS. Mallory,  Vice  Pres., 

The  K.  J.  &  Penna.  Concentrating  Co., 

Orange, IT.  J .  •  -c. 


MAR  ±2  1900 

Mar.  10.1900. 


Dear  Sir:- 

As  stated  to  you  in  our  letter  of  the  8th  inst.,tho  overs 
from  the  screons  in  crusher  house  of  Mill  Ho.  1  do  not  Return  to  the 
dryer  after  once  going  through.  The  delivery  of  overs  from  our  tower 
screens  go  down  to  the  fine  rolls, to  what  we  call  our  cellar  rolls, 
and  from  there  up  into  our  high  speed  finishing  rolls*and  so  into  the 
house.  I  believe  this  will  make  this  matter  a  little  more  plain  to  you* 

V/e  have  sent  forward  shipping  receipt  for  bags  of  ore  with  almandito 
mixture  whicHwe  hope  will  be  satisfactory. 

V?e  are  also  in  receipt  of  a  bill  from  your  works  for  grease  cups. 
We  have  had  to  go  to  quite  some  expense  to  get  this  ore  for  you, not 
considering  the  value  of  the  ore  which  we  shipped.  It  seems  as  if  in 
matters  of  this  kind  one  hand  should  wash  the  other  to  a  certain  extent. 
We  do  not  want  to  make  a  charge  for  a  small  matter  like  this  and  we  think 
on  the  other  hand, you  people  should  not  be  so  close  in  making  your 
charges,  v/e  will  pass  the  bill  of  §3. 91, dated  Orange, H.J.  Peb.  28,  if  you 

say  it  is  right  to  do  so.  . 

Yours  very  Truly, 


THE  HEW  JERSEY  ZIHC  COMPAHY, 

supt. 


•With  the  usual  screening, 


THE  NEW  JERSEY  ZINC  COMPANY, 

'I  BROADWAY.,  SOUTH  Mine  Hill,  FRANKLIN  FURNACE,  N.  .[.Mar.  19,1900. 

V7.S .Mallory ,  Vice  Pres.,  MflR  (g00 

The  N.J.  &  Fenna.  Concentrating  V/O0V5 
Orange,  IT.J. 

Dear  Mr.  Mallory 

Replying  to  yours  of  the  17th  inst.  I  think  it  would  be  inuch  bet¬ 
ter  to  charge  in  every  case  for  what  material  or  work  migh.t  /  be. 
done  for  each  other, but  we  made  no  charge  for  the  ore  which  we  mined 
and  shipped  to  you  and  thought  it  was  hardly  fair  for  you  to  make  a 


charge  for  material  you  furnished  us.  The  labor  on  the  ore  v/hich  we  got 
out  for  you,  especially  out  of  one  of  our  high  raises  in  Parker  Mine 
where  it  was  possible  to  get  such  as  you  wanted,ioostJus  feogood  deal 
more  to  get^than  the  amount  of  your  bill, not  placing  any  value  o&  the 
ore  at  all. So  much  for  this.  The  understanding  is  now  that  whatever  we 
do  for  each  other  we  will  make  a  nominal  charge  for.  We  have  put  your 
bill  in  dtitefile  marked"cancelled  ." 

With  reference  to  our  mill  would  say  for  your  information  and  that 
of  Mr.  Edison, of  coitr apj  we  find  that  we  have  many  soft  plates  on  our 
5 '  Rolls  arid  some  'bad  plates  on  the  smooth  36’s.  We  have  only  the  four 
sots  of  rolls. and  one  elevator  running.  We  have  put  through  a  little 
over  300  tons , grinding  50f,  of  it  down  through,  l/ 2x1/^  screens, the 
balance  probably  would  pass  through  1x1  screens . 

The  mill, of  coitrso,  has  had  no  test  and  will  not  have  any  worth 
report  ing  until  such  time  as  v/e  get  our  Dryer, Furnace  ,  Screens,  and 
3  High  Goated  Rolls  to  running.  Then  we  can  tell  nearly  what  the  mill 
will  do. 

Yours  very  Truly, 

THE  HEW  JERSEY  ZINC  GOMPAHY,  ;■ 


[FROM  WALTER  S.  MALLORY?] 


April  2nd, 1900. 

Mr.  Van  Hater, 

o/o  Derby  Load  Co. , 

Elvin,Mo, 

My  dear  Sir:  — 

The  question  ha3  recently  come  up  id  regard  to  the 
method  of  handling  the  ore  at  your  old  Mill;  that  is,  whether  it  was 
passed  through  the  Dryer,  then  went  to  the  soreens ,  the  overs  return¬ 
ing  and  being  mixed  with  fresh  quantities  of  wet  or  damp  material, 
and  then  going  through  the  Dryer  a  second  time.  We  have  written  Mr. 
Tonicing,  who  has  replied  that  the  material  at  present  does  not  go 
through  the  Dryer  the  second  time. 

Both  Kr.  Edison  and  the  writer  remember  distinctly  the  con¬ 
versation  we  had  with  Mr.  Courtright  When  the  Dryer  was  first  put 
up,  and  you  were  having  trouble  in  getting  the  material  to  the 
proper  degree  of  dryness.  It  was  suggested  that  you  return  the 
overs  from  the  soreens,  mixing  it  with  the  wet  ore;  then  they  would 
both  go  through  the  Dryer  together,  and  we  both  are  of  the  opinion 
that  this  was  done  at  that  time.  Will  you  kindly  advise  us  whether 
we  are  oorreot? 

We  are  asking  for  the  information  to  use  in  a  reference  oase 
on  one  of  our  patent  applications. 

Thanking  you  in  advanoe  for  your  reply,  we  are 
Yours  very  truly, 


{jpt J %J' 


fti'eAant 

S<u/iut/ C?AWmcm</s. 
/>tinA/S)y*H 


3&* 


</ 

Odtfi/i/er.  (tyAmonjAi 

Sfeeceo^,:^.fat/i^  &a/ent  <fa.aJtJ, 

3S jY*tJJati'£$ree£.  ,  - * - 

/April  4,  1900. 


John  P.  Randolph,  Esq., 

Edison  Laboratory, 

Orange,  N.J . 

.Dear  Sir,- 

V/e  sent  you  in  August  last  a  number  of/Sraft  bills, 
with  the  request  that  you  have  the  items  gonff  over  to  see 
if  they  were  charged  against  tlie  proper  companies.  Y/e 
have  revised  these  accounts  in  accordance  with  Mr.  Edison's 
talk  with  our  Mr.  Dyer,  putting  all  th/  items  (except  those 
relating  to  the  meter  and /compressed Air  inventions  for 
which  separate  bills  ha^,b  been  mad  of  out  and  forwarded  to 
Mr.  Mallory)  in  one  account  against  Mr.  Edison,  and  have 
today  mailed  to  him  bills  coveriA  these  amounts,  together 
with  a  statement  showing  the  pr/sent  condition.  Kindly 
therefore  return  td  us  the  biljfe  forwarded  to  you  last  August 
so  that  we  may  destroy  them  personally,  thus  avoiding  any 
complications  which  might  ar/se  and  keeping  the  accounts 
straight.  We /shall  hereaf yer  render  monthly  bills. 

Very ^ruly  yours, 

/  jy 


(J.R.T.) 


Derby  Dead  Company, 


Elvins,  Missouri.  April  5,  1900. 

Mr.  W.  S.  Mallory,  Vice  Proa 
H.  J.  &  Pennsylvania  C 
Edison  Labritory, 

Orange,  H.  J 

Dear  Sir: 

Your  favor  of  the 

In  reply  to  your  inquiry,  would  say  that  the  Ore  after  passing  through  the 
Edison  dryer  at  the  old  mill  was  elevated  to  a  tower  screen,the  thro.ughs 
from  which  were  delivered  upon  a  belt  conveyer  which  delivered  them 
immediately  into  the  separator  house.  The  overs  from  said  screen 
were  delivered  upon  another  belt  coveyer  which  carried  them  to  the 
intermediate  roils.  These  overs  are  not  returned  through  the  dryer, 
nor  were  they  ever  thus  returned.  If  you  had  any  point  you  wish  to 
establish  by  this  returning  of  the  overs  through  the  dryer  mix'eiwith 
the  wet  material,  I  am  sorry  that  the  facts  will  not  answer  your  pur¬ 
pose,  but  such  is  the  case. 


APR  71900 


yours  very  truly, 


'brlfcr- 

cl 

4*  Q,  , 


[INCOMPLETE] 


tfieccaA/  $airJrJ, 


May  10,  1900. 


...  ''RECEiVep') 
MYrUrlBOgf  j 


si  w  31 

ring  to3  your  letter -of  May  3rd  in  re  expiration 
?!  fo‘rei|ifcfand  ^orri^ponding  U.S.  patents,  we  beg  to  report  1 


no  foreign  phonograph  patents  which 
>he  life  of  U.S.  patents  expire  this  year. 

,The  bi^oa^Agraphophone  patents  expired  on  the  4th  inst., 

1  applied  for  May  4th  1886  and  the  tern 
*Tom  the  date  of  filing.  The  expiration 
of  these  English  patents  does  not  affect  the  life  of  the  corres¬ 
ponding  United  States  patents,  for  the  reason  that  the  United 
States  patents  issued  on  the  same  day  that  the  English  cases 


^Were  filed,  and  therefore  the  English  patents  are  not  prior 
patents  and  cannot  limit  the  life  of  the  United  States  patents. 

-  In  regard  to  the  phonograph  patents,  we  give  below  a 

list  of  the  patents  under  the  various  sets  which  have  any  bear¬ 
ing  on  the  life  of  the  U.S.  patents. 

Foreign  Set  84. 

This  set  comprises  U.S.  patents,  No.  382,414  granted 
May  8th  1888  on  attachments  for  burnishing  phonogram  blanks,  and 


[INCOMPLETE] 


Ho.  386,974  grouted  July  31st  1888,  which  was  the  first 
modern  machine  case  and  contains  claims  on  various  features 
employed  in  the  present  types  of  phonographs.  Under  the 
latest  authorities.  United  States  patents  are  not  limited  by 
corresponding  foreign  patents  unless  the  foreign  patent  was 
actually  granted  prior  to  the  granting  of  the  patent  in  this 
country;  that  is  to  say,  although  the  foreign  case  may  have 
been  filed  earlier  than  the  granting  or  issuing  of  the  pat¬ 
ent  in  this  country,  the  prior  issuance  of  the  patent  in 
this  country :will  avoid  limitation.  In  this  case,  so  far 
as  we  are  able  to  ascertain,  two  foreign  patents  were  grant¬ 
ed  prior  to  the  issuance  of  either  of  the  two  U.S.  patents 
included  in  thiB  set,  viz.,  Austrian  patent  granted  April 
16th  1888,  and  Portuguese  patent  granted  May  30th  1888,  the 
latter  affecting  only  U.  S.  patent  No.  386,974.  These 
patents  expire  January  14th  1903  and  May  30th  1903  respec¬ 
tively;  therefore  unless  certain  of  the  other  corresponding 
foreign  patents  affect  the  life  of  these  two  U.  S.  patents, 
the  U.  S.  patents  will  not  expire  until  January  14th  1903. 
The  other  patents  which  may  affect  the  life  of  these  two 
patents  are  the  fallowing: 

H.  S.  Wales,  filed  March  6,  1888,  expires  March  6,  1902. 
Victoria,  "  June  6,  "  "  June  6,  " 

Cape  Colony,  "  "  11,  "  "  "  11,  " 

S.  Australia,  »  "  16,  "  "  "  16,  .  " 

Queensland,  "  "  22,  "  "  "  22,  " 

Gennany,  "  .  J«*n.  6,  "  "  Jan.  7,  1903. 

Sweden,  "  "  30,  «  "  "  30,  " 

Norway,  "  Peb.  17,  "  Peb.  17, 

Prance,  "  Jani*  9,  "  "  June  9,  " 

Tasmania,  "  JiunC  18,  "  "  14  years  from 

date  of  acceptance.,  which 
date  we  have  no  record  of. 


PU 


0 


.  j  pJh^  .  -  i?o±€M. 

/9«>  I 


Mr*  William  E.  Gilmore,  j  t  C  f'j  V^  JjP 

National  Phonograph  Co.,  f  $fM  '  'IfiOO  /'  <3-^0 

Orange,  N.J. 

Dear  Sirs- 

Please  write  to  Mr.  Dyer  and  ask  him  whether  the  British  Colon 
ial  patents  in  Australasia,were  applied  for  under  provisions  of  the  "In¬ 
ternational  Convention",  so  that  they  expire  14  years  from  the  date  of 
the  application  for  the  .corresponding  American  patents,  or  whether  they 
expire  14  years  from  the  date  of  their  own  applications. 

Also,  if  the  former  is  the  case,  whether  this  still  further  shortens 
the  life  of  the  corresponding  American  patents,  so  that  they  expire  14 
years  from  the  dates  of  their  respective  applications. 

Yours  very  truly. 


SfoeAtin/ 

Sttmue/ • G£rfmon<&. 

/>rwA  JH&ytr. 


& 


<?  Y  s.  sbi  .  .  /Or  fj? 


/  n  >urvr;J)rw 

MJfcjeWGr* 


3/ j\tfeMaee'&face£. 

Qtcwtytn’/f?.  June  28,  ,3,900. 

r'RECEiV^; 

■  National  Phonograph  Company,  I  ,  Ji'X 

•''  (Irmwp  II.  .T.  k  ■  ■■••> 


W.  E.  Gilmore,  Esq.,  President, 

mograph  Comi  . , 

.'Orange,  „ 

Dear  Sir:.-  .■  ' 

\*  ryv"  v  | 

'Referring  to  your 'letter  of  the  26th  instant,  in  re 
phonograph  patents/  we  beg  to  state  that  none  of  the  foreign 
patents  were  taken  out  under  the  provisions  of  the  Inter¬ 
national  Convention.  The  British  Colonial  patents  all  run 
for  fourteen  years  from  the  date  of  filing  of  the  applica¬ 
tion  papers,  and  are  subject  to  the  payment  of  taxes  as  in  ' 
the  case  of  British  patents. 

We  believe  this  is  all  the  information  you  desire. 

If  not,  let  us  know  and  we  will  give  you  more  detailed  in¬ 
formation. 

Yours  very  truly^ 


In  regard  to  your  patent,  No.  648,935,  of  May  8,  1900, 
which  covers  the  Mechanical  Duplicating  Apparatus  employing  a  large 
sized  master  rotating  at  the  same  shaft  speed  as  the  standard  dupli¬ 
cate,  the  application  for  which  patent  was  filed  October  28,  1899, 
the  Manager  of  the  American  Graphophone  Oo.,  Thomas  H.  Macdonald, 
has  filed  an  application  on  the  same  invention,  and  an  interference 
has  been  declared.  Your  preliminary  statement  requires  to  be  filed 
on  or  before  July  20th,  next.  Kindly  furnish  us  with  the  following 


information,  in  order  that  we  may  prepare  the  statement: 

1.  When  did  you  conceive  the  invention?  v; 

2.  When  did  you  make  sketches  of  the  apparatus? 

3.  When  did  you  disclose  it  to  others? 

■  '  ■ .  ■  :  •  •  .  .  -  •  . . .  Vs 

4.  .  When  did  you  first  make'  a  model,  if  any?  .  .  • 

5.  When  did  you  first  make  a  full-sized  apparatus’,  if  any? 

6.  The  extent  of  use  to  which  the  invention  has  be,en  put.  '  .  ’ 

Kindly  give  this  matter  your  early  attention,  "and 'oblige 

‘  Yours  truly,  •  . ^-r- ^ 

'^•l.do  ‘  1  , 


Sum  ne/ /tZWnu>n</s. 
ZtrtuA  2St)yer. 


V.  »>:  -#^0* 

3ij\£,Jj<it<'.C/bce£. 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq 

Orange,  N.J. 


Your  favor  of  the  9th  instant  has  be(en  received, 
advising  us  of  your  dates  for  use  in  the  Edison- 
interference.  We  have  prepared  the  statement  therefrom  and 
beg  to  enclose  the  same  herewith.  Please  .execute  the  state¬ 
ment  and  have  the  same  acknowledged  before  aNotary  Public. 

In  the  enclosed  statement,  we  state  that  at  about  the  time 
of  the  conception  of  the  invention,  in  June,  1898,  sketches 
were  made  illustrating  the  same.  We  presume  that  this  is 
the  fact,  since  you  say  in  you r  letter  that  "a  new  drawing 
was  made  in  January,  1899",  from  which  we  infer  that  previ¬ 
ous  drawings  or  sketches  had  already  been  made  by  you.  The 
interference  is  at  present  suspended  by  reason  of  an  unim¬ 
portant  and  purely  formal  motion; by  Macdonald,  and'  it  is 
possible  that  in  the  event  of  a  redeclaration  thereof  a  new 
statement  from  you  will  be  required.  We  would  like,  howev¬ 
er,  to  have  the  enclosed  statement  signed  and  acknowledged 
by  you  as  soon  as  possible,  in  order  that  we  may  hold  the 
same  in  readiness  for  filing. 


(F.L.D. )  Enel. 


Yours  very  t,ruly,  # 


^  (PL™  - 


Your  application  for  patent  No.  994  for  Process  of 
Duplicating  Phonograms  filed  March  5th  1898,  which  is  at 
present,  involved  in  interference  with  Lambert,  has  also  been 
put  in  interference  with  an  application  of  Prank  L.  Capps  of 
Newark,  New  Jersey,  assignee  to  the  American  Graphophone 
Company,  on  the  following  issues 

"The  herein  described  process  of  molding  sound 
recordB  in  celluloid,  which  consists  of  softening  a 
celluloid  tablet  and  then  forcing  the  sane  against  a 
suitable  matrix  by  its  own  expansive  force." 

A  claim  in  the  words  of  the  issue  was  inserted  by  us  by 
amendment  at  the  invitation  of  the  Examiner,  since  there 
appeared  to  be  an  ample  basis  for  the  claim  in  the  case  as 
originally  presented,  the  specification  stating: 

"These  blanks  may  therefore  be  made  of  a  relatively 
hard  material  x  x  x  x  or  polished 
ebonite,  vulcanized  hard  rubber  or  celluloid  may  be 
used."  - 

Apparently  all  the  claims  of  the  Capps  case  are  limited  to 
the  carrying  on  of  the  process  in  connection  with  celluloid 
alone,  and  such  claims  would  therefore  be  dominated  by  the 
broader  claims  of  your  case.  The  preliminary  statement  re- 


quires  to  be  filed  on  or  before  August  10th  next,  and  we 
would  be  glad  to  have  your  dates  in  order  that  this  state¬ 
ment  may  be  prepared.  In  the  Lambert  interference  on  the 
broader  claim  not  limited  to  celluloid,  your  preliminary 
statement  alleges  that  the  invention  was  conceived,  dis¬ 
closed  to  others,  drawings  made,  and  the  process  actually 
reduced  to  practice  in  the  month  of  October  1888,  and  that 
since  that  time  the  process  has  been  continuously  practiced 
at  your  laboratory.  If  you  never  carried  on  the  process 
in  connection  with  celluloid, we  will  file  a  preliminary 
statement  similar  to  the  one  in  the  Lambert  interference, 
givihg  your  dates  of  the  broad  invention,  but  if  you  actual¬ 
ly  did  reduce  the  invention  to  practice  in  connection  with 
celluloid  blanks,  we  wish  you  would  let  us  know  when  such 
reduction  to  practice  was  effected. 

Yours  very  truly, 


yld/al 


ft/eAatttJIffiyeri 
Sim  i  A  SShjtn 


SfiieccieYfo  .•  YactJrJ, 

3S  j\taJJa/vf$ree6. 

tyZetrtym'S.  .  Julv^7,  1900. 


atfrjUtrj* 
tymerveiJfar  ior£ 
Ki.J^^OrR 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Es 
Orange, 

N.J. 


Dear  Sir,- 

We  have  been  requested  by  the  Edison  Ore  Milling 
Syndicate,  Limited,  of  London,  to  prepare  a  statutory  decla-. 
ration  to  be  used  in  an  application'  for  patent  in  Rhodesia 
to  which  some  opposition  has  been  developed.  We  therefore 
have  prepared  this  declaration  and  enclose  it,  together 
with  copy:  of  the  specification  and  drawings  referred  to 
therein.  Kindly  sign  this  paper  as  indicated  in  pencil, 
returning  all  to  us  as  early  as  possible. 

Very  truly  yours 


jrt/al 

Enclosures . 


7  ,^^  / 

7  <4 


9?«A a ntJ®, 
Sa>n«</ 0j5ffinon</s. 
SZtttiA  £2)y*r. 


.of 

^  Q^cr:(Q^AmomAj 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq • , 

Orange,  N.J. 

Dear  sir:- 


.M,^Vo.2'>/0arK 


etober  31,  1900. 


The  final  Government  fee  of/$20.  ia  due  November  12th 
on  your  application  on  Electric  Meters,  in  which  the  current  by 
electrolysis  decomposes  a  soluble  nfercury  salt,  the  metallic  mer¬ 
cury  set  free  being  measured  either  in  a  capillary  tube  or  by 
weight.  Kindly  advise  us  if  yon  wish  to  have  this  patent  issue. 

Other  applications  of/yours  which  have  been  allowed  and 
which  now  await  payment  of  the/final  Government  fees  are  No.  982, 
lubrioating  Journal  Bearings;/ No.  984,  Conveyors;  No.  985, 

Flight  Conveyors;  No.  993,  grinding  or  Crushing  RoIIb;  No.  1028, 
Apparatus  for  Resoreening  Fine  Materials;  and  No.  930,  Method  of 
Rescreening  Fine  Materials.  I  Since  all  of  these  latter  cases  re¬ 
late  to  your  ore  milling  aiM  cement  work,  in  connection  with  which 
you  informed1'  us  some  time  tfgo.  that  you  wished  to  have  all  the  pat¬ 
ents  issue  as  soon  as  possible,  it  occurs  to  us  that  you  may  de¬ 
sire  to  have\  the  final  fe/s  paid  at  this  time. 


[✓Yours  very  truly, 


WCCM/F 

FED/JM.  JL 

0 


Dear  Sir,- 

The  Interference  which  was  declared  between  the 
Macdonald  application  and  your  patent  of  May  8th  1900  on 
the  big  master  duplicating  machine  was  dissolved,  and  a  new 
interference  declared  with  an  additional  issue  limited  to 
the  bridge  which  straddles  the  master  and  which  carries  the 
recorder  and  reproducer.  We  assume  that  the  invention  as 
it  was  conceived  by  you  in  June  1898  and  embodied  in  the 
experimental  model  of  July  1898  did  in  fact  include  this 
bridge  for  carrying  the  recorder  and  reproducer,  and  upon 
this  assumption  we  have  prepared  and  enclose  a  preliminary 
statement  for  the  new  interference,  giving  the  same  dates 
of  invention  etc.  as  were  given  by/ .  you  in  your  preliminary 
statement  filed  in  the  dissolved  interference.  If  we  are 
incorrect,  and  if  in  fact  the  bridge  was  not  invented  until 
a  later  date,  kindly  advise  us  in  order  that. the  statement 
may  be  corrected. 

In  furnishing  us  with  data  for  the  preparation  of 
your  preliminary  statement  in  the  first  interference,  you 
said  on  July  9th  last  that  about  40  of  the  machines  ordered 
on  February  2nd  1899  from  the  Edison  Phonograph  Works  had 


been  delivered  and  put  in  operation  up  to  that  time.  In 
the  enclosed  statement  we  have  left  the  number  of  these  ma¬ 
chines  blank,  as  it  occurs  to  us  that  possibly  more  of  the 
machines  may  now  be  in  operation  than  were  in  use  in  July. 
If  so,  kindly  supply  the  correct  number  in  the  statement. 

The  statement  requires  to  be  signed  as  we  have  in¬ 
dicated  in  the  presence  of  a  Notary  Public,  and  as  it  must 
be  filed  in  Washington  before  the  9th  of  November,  we  would 
be  obliged  if  you  would  execute  and  return  the  same  to  us 
at  your  early  convenience. 

Yours  very  truly, 

fat,,™*'  ''  xy/— 

pid/al 


Enclosure. 


Smntif/ 0jSWiin>/u/s. 
//rut A /*////* 


S^/y/y/\  ■  (Qs/n  one/ 

\^tecea/^:&r.fat.&/®  &a/ett/>  ^erteJ/U. 

J/ 

November  7,  1900. 


taifajfMms 

Gillen  y  }<?n£ 

nt.Jfr.-2S>/0Grl: 


Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq., 
Orange,  N.J. 


Dear  Mr.  Edison:- 

Regarding  your  patent  on  the  expanding  pulley  form 
of  variable  gearing,  T  find  that  both  you  and  myself  were 
mistaken  as  to  what  you  have  secured  by  your  patent.  You 
filed  an  application  June  5,  1890,  on  this  device,  but  it 
was  rejected  on  a  number  of  patents,  including  that  to  Wales 
dated  July  11,  1876,  a  copy  of  which  is  enclosed,  and  in  view 
of  this  patent  your  application  was  finally  abandoned  after 
consultation  with  you  and  after  submitting  it  at  your  request 
to  the  General  Electric  Company.  The  only  patent  on  expand¬ 
ing  pulley  which  you  have  is  No.  476,984,  dated  June  14, 

1892,  which  covers  a  pulley  constructed  of  disks  with  flexi¬ 
ble  or  rope  connections  between  the  disks,  the  disks  being 
adjustable  towards  and  away  from  each  other.  You  will 
recollect,  also,  the  patent  of  yourself  and  Johnson  of  Eng¬ 
land,  No.  641,281,  dated  January  16,  1900,  covering  certain 
details  of  construction. 

I  assume  that  the  infringement  you  had  in  mind  is 
that  of  the  Reeves  Pulley  Company  of  Columbus,  Indiana.  T  > 
secured  some  time  ago  an  illustrated  pamphlet  issued  by  this 


Company,  which  I  send  you  in  a  separate  package,  thinking 
you  might  like  to  look  it  over. 


rtto/tm. 


+#£•*“■  t  <*y 

/&T.J 

(r|-'C 

^  V*- 


o-  Cj  *'x'<rJ 

uv~uuz  ' — 

^  tvCEZZT  l^-XT'7/Ls- 


C'TrW^f''^ 

Oh^f^f.  If*  ~ti 


Orange,  N.J., 


Dear  Sir:- 

In  accordance  with  your  instructions,  we  have  pre¬ 
pared  bills  of  complaint  in  suits  to  be  brought  against  the 
Lambert  Company  and  Thomas  B.  Lambert  for  infringement  of' 
certain  of  your  patents  by  the  sale  of  phonograph  records 
constructed  of  celluloid.  The  patents  infringed  (two  of 
which  stand  in  the  name  of  the  Edison  Phonograph  Company  and 
the  other  of  which  stands  in  the  name  of  the  National  Phono¬ 
graph  Company)  cover  a  phonogram  blank  having  a  tapering 
bore,  phonogram  blanks  of  waxlike  materials  end  having  the 
same  coefficient  of  expansion,  and  phonogram  blanks  provided 
with  internal  ribs  or  projections. 


Kindly  execute  the  bill  which  is  drawn  in  the  name 
of  the  Edison  Phonograph  Company  and  have  the  other,  drawn 
in  the  name  of  the  National  Phonograph  Company,  executed  by 
Mr.  Gilmore.  If,  after  execution,  you  will  return  both 
bills  to  us ,  we  will  promptly  forward  them  to  Chicago  and 
have  the  subpoenas  served. 

Yours  very  truly,  ■>  >> 

s  m/m.  /W^' 


Enclosures 


1900.  Phonograph  -  Edison  Phonograph  Works  (D-00-17) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to  the 
business  of  the  Edison  Phonograph  Works.  Among  the  correspondents  are  the 
Edison  United  Phonograph  Co.,  Samuel  Insull,  and  his  brother  Martin  Insull. 

Approximately  15  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  The 
unselected  items  consist  primarily  of  orders  placed  with  the  Phonograph  Works 
and  perfunctory  correspondence  regarding  those  orders,  as  well  as  bids  for 
plumbing  work. 


boon  so  overcrowded,  with  orders,  and. still  continue  to  bo  so  overcrowded 
with  them,  that  it  was  absolutely  out  of  the  question  for  us  to  oven 
Give  you,  an  idea  as  to  when  shipment  of  this  order  complete  oould  bo 
made.  .As  wo  understand  :lt,  you  desire  everything  shipped  complete, 
after  the  shipment  of  the  first  five  Home  phonographs. 


Ve  give  you  below  the  prioos  at  which  the  various  apparatus  will 


be  furnished: 

3  Gonoert  Phonographs, 

$50.00  each  net 

2  Large  Spring  Motor  Phonocraphs, 

■35.00  "  " 

45  Homo  Phonographs, 

14.50  "  « 

20  Standard  Phono graphs, 

10.00  "  " 

500  Records, 

.25  11  " 

6600  Blanks, 

8.85  Per  100. ,  net. 

All  boxed,  f.o.b.  oars,  Orange,  IT.  J. 

Wo  regret  that  the  order  is  so  email. that  we 

could  not  attempt  to 

make  these  up  under  the  contract  dated  March  11th 

,  1890,  as  the  time 

oonsumed  in  so  doing  would  be  a  very  important  factor,  to  say  nothing 

of  the  vory  high,  cost  of  snme.  V/e  have  therefore  made  arrangements  to 


E.  U.  P.  Co, 


(2) 


1/15/1900. 


olDtain  the  Goods  for  you  from  the  National  Phonograph  Co.,  for  v/hom  we 
are  building  a  large  number  of  all  the  different  typos  of  machines 
montioned. 


The  records,  of  oourse,  we  do  not  manufacture,  and  they  must,  of 
course,  ho  ohtninod  from  the  National  Phonograph  Co.  Under  the  cir- 
oumstunoes,  wo  should  like  to  have  you  advise  us  whether  this  method  of 
handling  the  order  is  entirely  satisfactory  to  yourselves,  it  being 
distinctly  understood  that  same  is  not  furnished  under  the  terms  of  the 
contract,  above  mentioned. 


As  -to  shipment ,  v/o  can  chip  the  f ivo  Home  phonographs  in  about  ton 
days  from  this  date  and  the  balance  of  the  order  we  hope  to  have  ready 
in  about  three  weeks  from  this  date.  The  writer  lias  looked  into  the 
matter  personally  and  regrets  that  this  is  the  very  best  time  v/e  can 
Give  you! 


v/c  can  firnlsh  you  with  one  Nickel-plated  Horae  Phonograph  complete 
at  the  price  of  §24.00  npt,  boxed,  f.o.b.  earn,  Orange,  N.  J. 

If  you  Will  advise  us  as  to .whether  the  above  arrangement  is  satis¬ 
factory,  vc  will  then  arrange  to  have  the  Nat ional/Pjftpitograph  Co.  send 
you  pro  forma  invoice  for  tho  goods.  / 

Yours  very  truly, 


TOSJ/XW 


General  Manager. 


Edi son  Phonograph  ’Yorks, 

ORANGE  N.J.  I  I 

!  f/Afe  ;  v  ,  i 

Dear  Sirs, 

We  are  duly  in  receipt  of  your  favo£ 
note  contents. 

Please  put  our  Order  No. 445  in  hand  at  once  in  order 
that  the  goods  may  be  shipped  within  the  time  specified, namely 
three  weeks, and  we  trust  you  will  expedite  it  as  much  asTpossi bl9. 

We  enclose  a  list  of  the  3 
or  marked _off  are  not  wanted. 

The  five  Home  phonographs  < 


•ecords  wanted,  tho^eCcro-ssed 
/ 


1  be  packed^hnd  sHi'pped 
with  the  other  45  Homes, making  a  total  of  50, and  y  ouh  aad ,  no  t^ 


it  ordered, or  pack  tham  in  burl-aji^ 
1  nickel  plated  Home  phonograph 


ship  any  by  express  as  at  firi 
Please  ship  also  oni 
complete  at  the  price  .quoted. 

This  being  a  special  order, we  hereby  waive  our  contract 
between  your  Works  and  this  Company  dated  March  Ilth  IS90,in 
respect  of  price  and  method  of  handling  this  order  onljr,  as  pro¬ 
posed  in  your  letter  of  Jany.I5th  1900.  Shipping  directions  will 
besent  you  within  a  week.  Ymi  1  i  l"i'n  I  j  . 

Secretary 


We  are  in  receipt  of  your  favor  of  Jan.  16th,  giving  further 
instructions  relative  to  your  order  No.  445.  As  stated  to  you  in  my 
letter  of  the  15th,  we  cannot  fill  this  order.  We  can,  however, 


arrange  to  obtain  the  giods  from  the  National  Phonograph  Co.,  and  I  am 
particularly  anxious  to  know  whether  we  shall  proceed  to  do  so,  or 
whether  it  is  your  desire  that  the  goods  be  gotten  out  by  ourselves. 

You  seem  to  have  overlooked  entirely  that  portion  of  my  letter  and  I 
should  like  to  have  a  distinct  understanding  as  to  same  before  proceedig 
with  this  order.  Please  let  us  hear  from  you. 

Yours  very  truly, 

(Signed).  W.  E.  Gilmore, 


weg/iww 


;  '  BETWEEN  "WANDJ3W streets,  September  24,  1900. 

PERSONAL. 


V.  E.  Gilmore,  Esq., 

c/o  Edison  Phonograph  Works, 
Orange,  N.  J. 


My  dear  Gilmore: 

In  confirmation  of  my  telephone  conversation  with  you  of 
this  morning  I  quote  below  what  I  read  you  from  Sam's  letter  to  me 
on  the  subject  of  the  Phonograph  notes. 

"I  want  you  to  get  at  Gilmore  and  see  if  you  cannot  arrange  so 
that  the  six  notes  that  you  now  have  he  will  consolidate  into  two 
notes,  each  for  .$3000.,  at  four  and  six  months,  on  an  understanding 
that  the  one  drawn  at  four  months  shall  be  renewed  for  its  face  at 
maturity,  and  the  one  drawn  at  six  months  $2,000.  shall  be  renewed, 
and  that  this  process  shall  go  on,  the  renewals  falling  due  on  the 
same  dates  that  the  various  notes  now  fall  due,  each  time  $1,000. 
being  paid  off  the  amount.  I  want  you  to  explain  to  him  that  we  have 
managed  to  use  six  of  the  notes,  but  that  we  cannot  use  the  other 
six,  and  that  we  need  the  money." 

I  thought  it  advisable  to  send  this  to  you  so  in  case  there 
had  been,  any  possible  misunderstanding  over  the  telephone. 

Trusting  that  you  will  be  able  to  arrange  this  matter  and 
thanking  you> in  advance  for  the  trouble  it  will  put  you  to,  believe 


[ATTACHMENT] 


A'  > 

Jt 


ch>  *  , 

i 


— c_- 

.  ..  ■  '  s6  • 


VHv^ 


SeEt^1_1900JL,89  ; 

/n  SnrmiPl  Tnaiill  t  _ _ _ _ _ 

139  Adams  St. ,  Chicago,  Ill.  ^ 


//  '  Edison  declines  to  make  proposed  new  notes , 

as  original  arrangement  was  made  and  agreced  to 

— by-lbim-prinoipa-l-l-y— on— the— under  atanding-of - 

.  long  time  notes.  Is  opposed  to  new  notes,  as  in 
the  eftyent  ,of  their  passing  out  of  your  bands  ■ 
or  your  decease,  then. new  notes  would' become 
-due  and  payable  for  ful-1  amount  of  .same  at 
—maturing-dates-,— as— any-arrangementasto-rdnewal 
unless • indicated  on  the  face  of  notes,  would 
be  hull  and  void. _ _ 


V-READ  THE  NOTICE  AND  AGREEMENT  ON  BACK.-£3 


1900.  Phonograph  -  Edison  United 
Phonograph  Company  (D-00-18) 


This  folder  contains  correspondence  and  other  documents  relating  to 
the  business  of  the  Edison  United  Phonograph  Co.  and  other  companies 
organized  to  exploit  the  Edison  phonograph  in  countries  otherthan  the  United 
States  and  Canada.  Included  are  items  concerning  the  financial  problems  of 
the  Edison  United  Phonograph  Co.  and  the  strained  relations  involving  the 
Edison-Bell  Consolidated  Phonograph  Co.,  Ltd.,  on  the  one  hand,  and  the 
National  Phonograph  Co.  and  the  Edison  Phonograph  Works,  on  the  other. 

Approximately  80  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  Items 
not  selected  include  letters  and  memoranda  pertaining  to  routine  daily 
operations  of  the  Edison  United  Phonograph  Co. 


<?**"<>  -  ^  dc, 

RAPHAEL  CONSONNI 

34,  RUE  DE  LA  VICTOIRE 


TfeUPMONE  N*  147*36 


ypec  '&L/ 

**U*f  pyi 


£UP<- 


My  dear  Mr.  Mdis on .  F 

I  think  it  is. of  the  utmost  importance  that  you  and  I  have' 
a  conference  over  phonograph  matters.  Is  it  possible  for  you  to  come 
over  to  Mew  York  on  Saturday.  If  so,  please  name  the  hour  which  will 
be  most  convenient  to  you.  I  am  sure  that  such  an  Interview  will  be 
for  our  mutual  interests. 


Yours  since: 


William  E 


Dear  Sir: 

Gouraud, 
Army"  to 
files  of 


HAYES  &  LAMBERT, 


D 

HtTD 


PA- 


.  Gilmore,  Esq., 
National  Phono.  Co., 

Orange ,  N.  J . 


flTe^ivWf  18  ’  190°- 

apr,  .ift.-  vm 

Ahs’d . . . . . 


I  leg  to  hand  you  copy  of  assignment  of  "George  Edward 
of  Little  Menlo  Beulah  Hill,  late  Colonel  in  the  United  States 
the  Edison  United  Phono.  Co.,  which  please. place  in  your 
the  English  natters. 

Yours  truly. 


[ENCLOSURE] 


THIS  INDENTURE  made  the  ninth  day  of  July,  One  Thousand  Eight  Hundred 
and  Ninety-one,  between  George  Edward  Gouraud  of  Little  Menlo  Beulah 
Hill  in  the  County  of  Surrey,  late  Colonel  in  the  United  States  Army, 
of  the  one  part,  and  The  Edison  United  Phonograph  Company  being  a  cor¬ 
poration  organized  and  existing  under  the  laws  of  the  state  of  New 
Jersey  in  the  said  United  States  of  America  (hereinafter  called  the 
Company)  of  the  other  part,  Whereas  by  certain  Letters  Patent  under 
the  Great  seal  of  the  United  Kingdom  of  Great  Britain  and  Ireland, 
short  particulars  whereof  are  set  out  in  the  Schedule  hereto,  Her 
Majesty  granted  to  the  said  George  Edward  Gouraud  her  especial  license 
full  power  able  privilege  and  authority  at  all  times  thereafter  during 
the  respective  terms  therein  mentioned,  to  make,  use,  exercise  and 
vend  the  respective  Inventions  mentioned  in  the  last  Column  of  the 
said  Schedule  within  the  United  Kingdom  and  the  Isle  of  Man,  and 
that  the  said  George  Edward  Gouraud  should  have  and  enjoy  the  whole 
profit  and  advantage'  from  time  to  time  accruing  from  the  said  Inven¬ 
tions  respectively  during  the  respective  terms  thereof,  And  Whereas 
the  said  George  Edward  Gouraud  is  still  the  legal  and  registered  owner 
of  the  said  several  patents,  but  the  Company  is  subject  to  the  reser¬ 
vation  hereinafter  contained,  entitles  in  equity  to  the  same  Patents 
And  Whereas  the  said  George  Edward  Gouraud  has  agreed  to  enter  into 
these  presents  for  the  purpose  of  assigning  and  transferring  to  the 


[ENCLOSURE] 


said  Company  the  legal. right  in  the  said  Patents  to  which  they  are  so 
entitled  as  such  equitable  owners,  Now  This  Indenture  Witnesseth  that 
in  pursuance  of  the  said  agreement  and  in  consideration  of  the  pre¬ 
mises  The  said  George  Edward  Gouraud  doth  hereby  transfer,  assign  and 
set  over  unto  the  Company  the  six  several  Letters  Patent  mentioned  in 
the  said  schedule  and  his  entire  right,  title  and  .interest  therein  a 
and  thereto,  and  all  benefits,  privileges  and  advantages  arising 
therefrom,  including  the  right  of  applying  for  an  extension  of  the 
respective  terms  thereof,  Excepting  and  Reserving  only  out  of  the 
assignments  hereby  made  the  right  to  use  any  of  the  said  inventions 
and  improvements  in  or  in  connection  with  dolls,  toys,  toy  figures 
and  clocks,  To  hold  the  same  (except  as  herein  excepted)  unto  the 
Company  absolutely. 

In  Witness  whereof  the  parties  to  these  presents  have  here¬ 
unto  set  their  hands  and  seals  the  day  and  year  first  above  written. 

The  Schedule  before  referred  tn. 


No. of  Patent. 

Date . 

To  whom 
granted. 

Subject  matter  of 
Invention. 

17175  of  1887 

14  December, 
1887. 

George  Edward 
Gouraud , 

Improvements  in  Phonographs 
&nd -Phonograms. 

5307  of  1888 

10  April 

1888. 

George  Edward 
Gouraud . 

Improvements  in  the  manufac¬ 
ture  of  Phonogram  Blanks  and 
Phonograms  and  Apparatus 
therefor. 

[ENCLOSURE] 


Bo. of  Patent.  '  Date.  To  whom 

granted. 


Subject  matter  Of 
Invention. 


12593  of  1888.  1  September  George  Edward 

1888.  Gouraud. 


12594  of  1888.  1  September  George  Edward 

1888.  Gouraud. 

16212  of  1888  8  November  George  Edward 

1888.  Gouraud. 


7794  of  1889  9  May,  1889  George  Edward 

Gouraud. 


Improvements  in  recording 
and  reproducing  sounds 
and  in  means  applicable 
therefor. 

Improvements  in  Phono¬ 
graphs. 

Improvements  in  Phonographs 
or  Apparatus  for  recording 
and  reproducing  sound  and 
in  Phonograms  or  surfaces 
for  receiving  sound  records 
and  in  Envelopes  'for  such 
Phonograms . 

Improvements  in  or  appli¬ 
cable  to  Phonographs  arid 'in 
the  manufacture  and  use  of 
Phonogram  Blanks  or  surfaces 
for  receiving  the  sound 
record. 


Signed  Sealed  and  Delivered  ) 

by  the  above  named  George  )  g.  g.'  Gouraud.  L.  S. 

Edward  Gouraud  in  the  presence  of  ) 

C.  Chabot , 

50  Old  Broad  Street, 

Solicitor. 


3. 


New  York,  a^yt  17,  190. 


Eon.  William  C.  Lover lng, 

3824  UaeoAuJxieettB  Avenue  r.K^V) m  or 

.  Washington,.  fa&p  a, jnhoi'bor  :• ' t.-Hfrwi.v  •  o 
Bear  Mr.  Lovering:. .  ^  {(>>  -[V  ■  cu  b  tapiy  *» 

I  Beg  to  confirm  my  aocvereatlon  with  you  of 
to-day  In  vbi.op._  X  you.  the,*  ,k.tovjR*«nir«dyou 

fully  to  the jr  extent.  ..oj  .$J5t000  Ip  rel*«!terk(W?. 
ship  of  _ a :,no je..o£;  tJ^^diBOiij-ual.t^oi-. phb nogrUpS  S0M£aftjr fi* 
for  $30,000,  'bearing 36^;,lntere8li  and  due  Mareh  65  3,90-1. 

1  u^^ly^5R^Ae^98ftV^e1^uSh*fch«B0»«lowa 

Bank  °f  *ZPf*  o^ift^oo^Vnndil  am  j 

forwarding  ate  Md$*fc*dh*a.<»*tiea  j 

that  you  are  aeoure^  fa  tfapif&pn.  e«teatv<of  *6 ,***>. 

This  will  Beoure  yop.  yoUr  | 

interest  In  that  note.,of>$151f!op,tpnd  1,  hereby  ;*eree.  to  :  | 

protect  you  fully  to  that  extep^.fta5hete9our>iti*8r«iioh  1 

are  already  deposited,  in  .  the-,  Oua^stn^ey  ajrutt  Company:  of" 

New  York  City  are  n»r«  .  than  ^de<^uate.ato.  jay  the  reudihlng 
halanoe  of  $15,000,  no  you  may.  have  .np.^pprohsneionsof  1 

any  kind  but  that  you  are  fully  protected ,  and  that  oia-«y  \ 

intention  as  I  assured  you  in  my  conversation :with  you 


w.  c.  l.  -a- 

to-day.  I  aleo  havo  aeked  Mr.  ^ttrleii'to'doliTer  you 
at  onoa  tbrou^  Mr.  Scrris^^^ittfloit'-ii^Safea^slhit^ao  of 
the  Stock  of  C^&f>lfflpfeofiS.°'6,ojaii8Bse-f.o 

which  you  arc  entitled,  and  which,  ha  holds  simply  e» 
Iruatee .  '  to  CG%*m  fi^ttJfVWeatioa  with  you  of 

VregreiF  ¥HAt  Y*f  h^T&adieanjt  aas-yo  u 

gret  or  ooncorn'^fn^hfi  ittittcrj  tte  I  ‘-'Stall'd s  hsree  yarutmgetJlr- 
had  I  kn ownr o^yevir t SP.ail? J s ttiir  i'4<& f  hhaep  rhai  3EOttpaE$*o*» 

taken  hyr  sotS  flow  too  State*  tt?  ISO*, 

on  the  OT*Cof  Piy,,^ipaSrttS,e''i'ih^::itiriiSeVrbuthaiibaaiflHddio3iiil 
"before  I  hOTe^pfote^r^^^r^Very  <M^toflDirtfcfe*fc4s  am 
additional?  WiSad^ihSUh^Otmtftice 

large  profit,  ^eui’^^r&lPc  jcil5, 

feel  that  you : not. elites ecajcntr, 

I  feel  you'  wm  'he^Sr^^^Bfafitt^^  If *p ‘-tear  &&&£.<*&. 
extended.  I  tAbS  you  Ho*  if’^SS-caS^t^ie^tdsKKetaiich  , 
interest  in  the  afiair»n of : "11^58®^  St ui*  t  cmtei^o*> 
he  successful  and  will 
hand  all  ay  energies'  OMf** 

notea,  and  seoond,  to  -the  h^iSdi^VtP^^aP^drfe-aahuW^y 
nesa  with  a  handsome  profit1  if  of  all  =V« rdfcoidtatwflWfc  yM 

ten  ejtdyflveTy  «U  the  interest*  of  every  nature  that 


W.  C.  Zia 


there  la  In  this  huaineaa. 

Thanking  you  lor.  jour 

“  “  *r*’»r.T*f*  or 

“  “4  '^ssu ?mm****»«*  . 

other  Bide,  I  remain, 

Youra  ?aithful3y,  . . . 

,  .-c.-'  l.i  fois  iaa f. •>•'••.-,  hj*  X:0<nlTa  box* yanmageSr- 


»  of  w/  d'ryaz'ture  *’foSk/fci»rop#j^u^ 

,•?«••-  i>i Recced:  5hfc '■SVes'jr  ‘*6^  eji£.-m>.h  -xs'-.r  ,<©t 

.  sncursho*''  your’ 'intereirt  ¥il^^l*ldbyJbu&#cic>t 

i  •:.•■; ,  .ted  '’f&twfia  tiVrl«'v*rfrt*‘> 


c-,  i*  -jr^'-eaS^tllW^tiataaniaftttoli' 

■  of  tha^doS^oft?  'Sqitt  tcihou^vioto 
uid  teok'i'kl-nir 


-  bo-ftli. 


.  39X  HAR(M'tR&£$'WQA®,,  W.C . 

L0 MB1 0  M.llth  September  1900 

'  Thomas  A.  Edison  Esq.,  /, -./vs 

ORANGE.  N.  J.  (U.S.A.)  jyV  I 7  ‘{J 

Dear  Sir,  \\^  /^  43 

I  am  instructed  by  my  Directors  to  dra^our\^t  taction 
to  the  fact,  of  which  you  cannot  but  be  Jtali^ware^that  cW-  ^ 
tain  parties  in  New  York,  are  continually  Oip^Og-loods  of  your 
manufacture  into  our  territory,  .and  I  am  desiredto  ask  you,  as"'* 
a  gentleman  of  honour,  whether  you  consider,  we  -are  being  fairly^ 
treated,  and  whether  you  have  so  parted,  with  your  rights,  and 
the  influence  conferred  by  those  rights,  that  you  are  now  power-., 
less  to  protect  the  interests  of  tho se .who  paid  a  large  sum  of 
money  for  territorial  privileges  on  the  faith  of  a  title  givdn 
by  you. 

The  most  flagrant  instance' of  piratical  trading  to 

which  X  will  refer  is  that  of  Mr.  0.  E.  Stevens.  He  circular- 

(izes 


.1, 


'Thomas  A.  Edison  Esq.  (Continued) 


the  British  Isles,  Australia,  India  and  Cape  Colony,  quoting 
your  goods  at  prices  with  which  it  is  impossible  for  us  to  com¬ 
pete.  To  make  a  living  profit  it  is  obvious  that  he  must  ob- 
t&in  your  goods  at  prices  much  below  those  you  quote  my  Company, 
or  he  is  a  philanthropist  anxious  to  benefit  his  fellow  crea¬ 
tures  by  letting  them  have  Phonographs  at  cost,  plus  expenses. 
As  I  personally  do  not  think  Mr.  Stevens  is  a  philanthropist 
my  first  deduction  seems  the  most  probable. 

As  a  case  in  point  I  will  take  Australia.  My  Company 
has  shipped  to  that  Colony  at  very  considerable  expense  hun¬ 
dreds  of  your  Machines  and  thousands  of  records.  These  goods 
have  been  consigned  to  an  Agent  for  sale,  my  Company  taking 
all  risks.  The  Agent  has  just  informed  me  that  all  dealers  in 
Australasia  have  received  circulars  from  Mr.  Stevens,  quoting 
the  very  lowest  prices  prevailing  in  New  York.  I  will  ask  you 

how  is  it  possible  for  us.  to  sell  at  a  profit  in  face  of  his 
action.  ■ 

You  cannot  accuse  my  Company  of  want  of  enterprise, 
for  the  Australian .venture  runs  into  thousands  of  pounds  ster= 
ling.  In  South  Africa  we  have,  at  great  expense,  pushed  the 
business,  and  the  same  would  have  been  done  in  India  on  a  large 
scale,  but  no  good  firm  will  take  the  matter  up,  solely  owing 
to  the  circulars  from  New  York  spoiling  the  market. 


•Thomas  A.  Edison  Esq.  (Continued) 

I  wish  to  impress  upon  you  that  the  great  damage  we 
suffer  arises  primarily  from  Stevens’  quotations,  apart  from 
any  trade  he  may  do.  Dealers  cannot  understand  why  he  is  in  a 
position  to  quote  below  the  parties  holding  the  legal  rights, 
which  rights  came  directly  from  you  for  a  consideration,  and  we 
are  obliged  to  admit  that  we  cannot  explain  how  it  is  that  the 
supreme  head  of  the  Phonograph  trade  allows  such  unfair  trading 
to  go  on  behind  his  signature. 

In  the  foregoing  I  have  endeavoured  to  bring  home  to 
you  as  briefly  as  possible  the  full  significance  of  the  position 
created  by  your  allowing  illicit  trading,  and  especially  the 
circularizing  principally  by  Mr.  Stevens,  and  am  requested  to 
say  that  my  Directors  will  be  pleased  to  receive  a  communication 
from  you  personally  as  to  What  you  oan  do  to  protect  the  inter* 
ests  of  those  who  purchased  certain  rights  on  the  strength  of 
your  name,  and  who  now  loplc  to  you  to  protect  your  signature 
to  the  utmost  of  your  power.  it  is  a. serious  matter  for  iiiy 
Oompany,  and  deserving  of  your  greatest  consideration,  and  1 
trust  to  receive  from  you  assurances  that  the  practices  cbm1- 
plained  of  will  be  stopped  forthwith,  and  subh  assistance  bn 
your  part  in  the  future  as  will  effectually  prevent  irresponsi¬ 
ble  parties  from  doing  that  which  jeopardises  belief  in  the  good: 
faith  of  one  so'  well  known  as  yourself. 


Thomas  A.  Edison  Esq.  (Continued) 


Awaiting  the  favour  of  your  early  reply. 
1  cm. 


Yours  faithfullyj 


[ATTACHMENT] 


1^-0^-  Oi,  ck.^0  V  Oa-fct  oif  ^ j  *^n-fci/|W - - 

fL~e  -fc  "fc  Ed  lot*,  L 

Qd  V^j  *  ""t"OL'k-LV'r*j  p'“_1'|  UA  cJv^ 

o.  oLvc>-'-'-e-'-"-*j  fturv*'&  G  a-ot^y  -to  blJ? y-  d~~  WtJL  b 

MU  C*  ojLpX*c<  yu  of  ^  • 


a^.  c^l<i.wcj  'v^oTA.-fl-cj  6  <-j 

S£&-o-ci  eS  ■\ust*.cb&-'*d-'^  LAA_n  j 


^ ot^  ^My0^0^ i^^-EzcrxJ 

jLc^.e-  VAV  -i\«.c»a(m  Ljoiwu  3W-  otJcii  ‘-~ 

'  ^uJ  ^»3£jU<W>  Jts  H  V^«>  ^ovv 
.  i  rjrn^  - 


[ATTACHMENT] 


,  v 


.^O^LtLvJlo  U^Tfer 

VJ^-M-JZZpL-  (DA  \u  £)^~(PttCZX  Oji 

C}-A^-t>  O0  ^  »-aZ$6  llue.  ^L>vm*Ze^u\yt.C^  (s  u^.c*A-t-o-o 

^A^-d>-^Lcy  JL«Xw.(sLtci  uwto  \jLc,  V-0-v»«(b*  e>-^ 

C>_  jA-sjJa-P'.C-  eJJ  *7  '~1\a-<-o'  >JLi_^jU.Tc)  oJJ  uv- 

w^' fltCf  c4~  ^LX-^-PvC,  /i 

LO«D%^.  CoLA^i^i-  ^  £0^  t-oGswt) 

\d  V^eJiv.iA^dJL 

.  QjO  *~\l3  V>J£W4,  C-_^ 

(^JU-C^£^Aa^L^C^^  t)Lo»  <2.0  V-o  cLo  CA“ 

JLo-^y  ~VwZZ^  «pw>^,d-*-< !— 

cLo'wvoc^  oJljL 

V-o-oq_  cc,  ^uq^Jh"^T-i  ^  ®-e  ' 

‘i_0'\5v-U(y^t-  0^0  tL  Co  o>6w^Aja—  \jl'-4^_i- 

&* 


crv  ^'J^i^-'^-Cu^-a.  ^cutoZE*  *nr 
we-v-i  cLo  V^  fcvfc?  oJLt  [tZeI31  • 


Cxs-C-  VA-'fi  U 

\j&-Wv.c-  0 

<J  ■  « 

vl  VjOL-O  U  <V  jLaja^.  U-oEX3^  U-E'Uaju*.  (2&i,  (s-u^~  Uv_<l^a- 
L A>3lJb*-L*tJCo  t  ^  ^'-eLAj  V* 


TCZaju^  Ci_'0  'Sfc-jT 


0?3 


[ATTACHMENT! 


‘  .  ■  ■  ..  .3  '■ 

O^o  efc-  j^-c^wo  c^cJL  -^a-u  w  '~G 

;  '  ~  v*mW o.  g°-^ 

^Cj  cAj_o  V"V— pv\_0-  ■  ~'' 

■^tZ^ls^Oo-L  VUJ.  ^JXU^oJL  •^-‘-G^U'^o  W-er^i.  •Vi'fiyovrL- 

tte^  S'  ^  —  ' 


3LLx4>^-  ^)L  €ct^  , 


J-C)  CJO  V--CX-Q 

DO  tnu  E> oJ^-Pvc  Wo-ov^-P  w  |)££2^Xi  c^. 

'  Ok  —( —  rt  _-, '■—A.  ^  l4“  Ia.0^-0  v 


W^ Cv-^V  c 


^  e  - - A  ••  ^  \  tJi-td'  Or^w  wi-UKti 


3" 


— ^ 


39.CH< 


wrc'frssiroAo,  w.c. 

M  LOKIOOM1.  lWh  October,  1900. 

Thomas  A.  Edison  Esq.,  ,/  |  \  ^ ^  C  £ "  ~\ 

Edison  Phonograph  Works,  ORASTSHf^tj.  ois.AJ/fti/  ,  ^  / 

I  Ul,~’{-  1900  / 

Dear  Sir,  '&!?:■' :'C .  / 

I  am  instructed  by  my  Directors’  to  acknowledge  receipt 
of  your  letter  of  the  27th  of  September,  and  to  say  that  they 


are  much  disappointed  that  you  will  i 


st  do  anything  to  stop 


i  point  out  that  all  fees 


taxes  in  respect  of  the  Patents 


purchased  have  been  and  are  regularly  paid. 

You  state,  that  the  national  Phonograph  Co.,  a  Company 


in  which  you  have  a  large  interest,  purpo  se  doing  busi.  ness  wher¬ 
ever  there  are  no  valid  or  sustainable  Patents,  or  where  the 
owners  do  not  litigate  the  Patents.  What  my  Directors  strongly 
complain  about  is  that  the  national  Phonograph  Co.,  or  at  least 


(Continued) 


parties  in  very  close  connection  with  them,  do  trade  or  endeav¬ 
our  to  trade  in  territory  where  we  have  successfully  litigated 
the  Patents,  viz:-  Australia  and  Cape  Colony. 

My  Company  has  been  put  to  enormous  expense,  first  in 
purchasing  the  Patents;  secondly  in  defending  them,  and  now, 
when  it  was  hoped  some  advantage  would  be  reaped,  circulars 
from  your  side  are  sent  throughout  the  territory  in  question, 
quoting  prices  at  which  it  is  very  well  known  by  you  and  your 
friends  that  we  cannot  c ontpe te  with  and  live. 

The  least  that  was  expected  was  that' you  kould  use 
your  influence  towards  stopping  parties  from  spoiling  our  mar¬ 
ket  in  countries  rightfully  belonging  to  us.  It  seems  you  can¬ 
not  or  will  not,  and  therefore  it  but  remains  for  my  Directors 
to  do  what  they  can  in  the  situation"  thus  created. 

Yours  faithfully. 


PUBLICATION  AND  MICROFILM 
COPYING  RESTRICTIONS 


Reel  duplication  of  the  whole  or  of 
any  part  of  this  film  is  prohibited 
In  lieu  of  transcripts,  however, 
enlarged  photocopies  of  selected 
items  contained  on  these  reels 
may  be  made  in  order  to  facilitate 
research. 


A  Note  on  the  Sources 

The  pages  which  have  been 
filmed  are  the  best  copies 
available.  Every  technical 
effort  possible  has  been 
made  to  ensure  legibility. 


FINANCIAL  CONTRIBUTORS 


PRIVATE  FOUNDATIONS 
The  Alfred  P.  Sloan  Foundation 
Charles  Edison  Fund 
The  Hyde  and  Watson  Foundation 
National  Trust  for  the  Humanities 
Geraldine  R.  Dodge  Foundation 


PUBLIC  FOUNDATIONS 
National  Science  Foundation 
National  Endowment  for  the 
Humanities 

National  Historical  Publications  and 
Records  Commission 


PRIVATE  CORPORATIONS  AND  INDIVIDUALS 


Alabama  Power  Company 

Anonymous 

AT&T 

Atlantic  Electric 

Association  of  Edison  Illuminating 
Companies 

Battelle  Memorial  Institute 
The  Boston  Edison  Foundation 
Cabot  Corporation  Foundation,  Inc. 
Carolina  Power  &  Light  Company 
Consolidated  Edison  Company  of  New 
York,  Inc. 

Consumers  Power  Company 
Cooper  Industries 
Corning  Incorporated 
Duke  Power  Company 
Entergy  Corporation  (Middle  South 
Electric  System) 

Exxon  Corporation 

Florida  Power  &  Li$it  Company 

General  Electric  Foundation 

Gould  Inc.  Foundation 

Gulf  States  Utilities  Company 

David  and  Nhia  Heitz 

Hess  Foundation,  Inc. 

Idaho  Power  Company 


IMO  Industries 

International  Brotherhood  of  Electrical 
Workers 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stanley  H.  Katz 
Matsushita  Electric  Industrial  Co.,  Ltd. 
Midwest  Resources,  Inc. 

Minnesota  Power 
New  Jersey  Bell 
New  York  State  Electric  &  Gas 
Corporation 

Nortli  American  Philips  Corporation 
Philadelplu'a  Electric  Company 
Philips  Lighting  B.V. 

Public  Service  Electric  and  Gas  Company 
RCA  Corporation 
Robert  Bosch  GmbH 

Rochester  Gas  and  Electric  Corporation 
San  Diego  Gas  and  Electric 
Savannah  Electric  and  Power  Company 
Schering-Plough  Foundation 
Texas  Utilities  Company 
Thomas  &  Betts  Corporation 
Thomson  Grand  Public 
Transamerica  Delaval  Inc. 

Westinghouse  Foundation 
Wisconsin  Public  Service  Corporation 


BOARD  OF  SPONSORS 


Rutgers,  The  State  University  of  New  National  Park  Service 
Jersey  John  Maounis 

Francis  L.  Lawrence  Maryanne  Gerbauckas 

Joseph  J.  Seneca  Roger  Durham 

Richard  F.  Foley  George  Tseios 

David  M.  Osliinsky  Smithsonian  Institution 

New  Jersey  Historical  Commission  Bernard  Finn 

Howard  L.  Green  Arthur  P.  Molella 


EDITORIAL  ADVISORY  BOARD 

James  Brittain,  Georgia  Institute  of  Technology 
R.  Frank  Colson,  University  of  Southampton 
Louis  Galambos,  Johns  Hopkins  University 
Susan  Hockey,  University  of  Alberta 
Thomas  Parke  Hughes,  University  of  Pennsylvania 
Peter  Robinson,  Oxford  University 

Philip  Scranton,  Georgia  Institute  of  Teclmology/Hagley  Museum  and  Library 
Merritt  Roe  Smith,  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology 


THOMAS  A.  EDISON  PAPERS 


Robert  A.  Rosenberg 
Director  and  Editor 

Thomas  E.  Jeffrey 
Associate  Director  and  Coeditor 

Paul  B.  Israel 

Managing  Editor,  Book  Edition 
Helen  Endick 

Assistant  Director  for  Administration 


Associate  Editors 
Theresa  M.  Collins 
LisaGitelman 
Keith  A.  Nier 

Research  Associates 

Gregory  Jankunis 
Lorie  Stock 


Assistant  Editors 
Louis  Carlat 
Aldo  E.  Salerno 


Secretary 
Grace  Kurkowski 


Amy  Cohen 
Bethany  Jankunis 
Laura  Konrad 
Vishal  Nayak 


Student  Assistants 


Jessica  Rosenberg 
Stacey  Saelg 
Wojtek  Szymkowiak 
Matthew  Wosniak 


Thomas  A.  Bdison  Papers 
at 

Rutgers,  The  State  University 
endorsed  by 

National  Historical  Publications  and  Records  Commission 
18  June  1981 

Copyright  ©  1999  by  Rutgers,  The  State  University  •  ■  • 

All  ri$its  reserved.  No  part  of  this  publication  including  any  portion  of  the  guide  and  hulex  or  of 
the  microfilm  may  be  reproduced,  stored  hi  a  retrieval  system,  or  transmitted  in  any  form  by  any 
means — graphic,  electronic,  mechanical,  or  chemical,  ineludingphotocopying,  recordhigor  taping, 
or  information  storage  and  retrieval  systems— witliout  written  permission  of  Rutgers,  The  State 
University,  New  Brunswick,  New  Jersey. 

The  original  documents  hi  this  edition  are  from  the  archives  at  the  Edison  National  Historic  Site 
at  West  Orange,  New  Jersey. 


ISBN  0-89093-703-6 


CX  £dU>oru1£ 


ope** 


A  SELECTIVE  MICROFILM  EDITION 

PART  TV 
(1899-1910) 


Thomas  E.  Jeffrey 
Lisa  Gitelman 
Gregory  Jankunis 
David  W.  Hutchings 
Leslie  Fields 


Theresa  M.  Collins 
Gregory  Field 
Aldo  E.  Salerno 
Karen  A.  Detig 
Lorie  Stock 


Robert  Rosenberg 
Director  and  Editor 


Sponsors 

Rutgers,  The  State  University  Of  New  Jersey 
National  Park  Service,  Edison  National  Historic  Site 
New  Jersey  Historical  Commission 
Smithsonian  Institution 


University  Publications  of  America 
Bethesda,  MD 
1999 


Edison  siguatur 


I  with  permission  of  MoGraw-Edlson  Company